Open Photography Forums  
HOME FORUMS NEWS FAQ SEARCH

Go Back   Open Photography Forums > Photography Discussions > Architectural - Industrial

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 28th, 2018, 06:18 PM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default Antonov 124-100M

The Antonov An-124 is a Ruslan strategic airlift jet aircraft. It was designed in the 1980s by the Antonov design bureau in the Soviet Union (USSR). The An-124 was for thirty years (i.e., until 2011) the world's heaviest gross weight production cargo airplane and second heaviest operating cargo aircraft, behind the one-off Antonov An-225 (a greatly enlarged design based on the An-124).The An-124 remains the largest military transport aircraft in the world. The commercial version of the Antonov AN-124 has the designation 100M, of which about 26 remain operational.

An Antonov AN-124 100M visited our airport in Thunder Bay three times this past year to deliver railway car materials from Austria to the Bombarier railcar factory. The local paper reported the cost per journey approximated $1million. The Bombarier factory had historical importance for the aircraft industry because a previous owner (the Canadian Car and Foundry Company) manufactured Hawker Hurricance fighter planes there during WW2. More than half the workforce were women directed by chief engineer Elsie McGill. The latter, known as "Queen of the Hurricanes", was likely the world's first woman to earn an aeronautical engineering degree and the first woman in Canada to receive a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering.

Along with some other interested folk, I went to the airport last Thursday to watch the Antonov take off for its return to Europe. The first photo shows a truck pushing the plane from its parking place to the runway. The people seem the size of ants when walking alongside the plane.

The sturdy truck did its job of pushing well, but the effort clearly exhaused it (pun intended). With the job done, clouds of smoke emerged as the poor vehicle struggled to make its way back to the mechanic's shop for repairs. I hope it recovered. Should I have sent flowers?

The Antonov taxied to the start of the runway and revved its engines. Look at the dust cloud behing the plane's tail. The cars in the parking lot would need to visit the carwash later that day. Who'd pay for that?


Then take-off! I was amazed how quickly the plane accelerated down the runway. Apparently, the plane needs 1.5 miles of runway when fully loaded, but it was empty this time.

Bye bye Antonov. I hope see you again next time you visit. Mike
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old April 28th, 2018, 06:45 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Colombia
Posts: 682
Default

That must have been fun to see . It can;t be often one spots these exceptional vehicles in operation.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old April 28th, 2018, 07:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 34,601
Default

I was thinking, does Anatonov make telephoto lenses too, LOL!

But itís a plane!

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old April 28th, 2018, 07:38 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 34,601
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Stones View Post
The Antonov An-124 is a Ruslan strategic airlift jet aircraft. It was designed in the 1980s by the Antonov design bureau in the Soviet Union (USSR). The An-124 was for thirty years (i.e., until 2011) the world's heaviest gross weight production cargo airplane and second heaviest operating cargo aircraft, behind the one-off Antonov An-225 (a greatly enlarged design based on the An-124).The An-124 remains the largest military transport aircraft in the world. The commercial version of the Antonov AN-124 has the designation 100M, of which about 26 remain operational.

An Antonov AN-124 100M visited our airport in Thunder Bay three times this past year to deliver railway car materials from Austria to the Bombarier railcar factory. The local paper reported the cost per journey approximated $1million. The Bombarier factory had historical importance for the aircraft industry because a previous owner (the Canadian Car and Foundry Company) manufactured Hawker Hurricance fighter planes there during WW2. More than half the workforce were women directed by chief engineer Elsie McGill. The latter, known as "Queen of the Hurricanes", was likely the world's first woman to earn an aeronautical engineering degree and the first woman in Canada to receive a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering.

Along with some other interested folk, I went to the airport last Thursday to watch the Antonov take off for its return to Europe. The first photo shows a truck pushing the plane from its parking place to the runway. The people seem the size of ants when walking alongside the plane.

The sturdy truck did its job of pushing well, but the effort clearly exhaused it (pun intended). With the job done, clouds of smoke emerged as the poor vehicle struggled to make its way back to the mechanic's shop for repairs. I hope it recovered. Should I have sent flowers?

The Antonov taxied to the start of the runway and revved its engines. Look at the dust cloud behing the plane's tail. The cars in the parking lot would need to visit the carwash later that day. Who'd pay for that?


Then take-off! I was amazed how quickly the plane accelerated down the runway. Apparently, the plane needs 1.5 miles of runway when fully loaded, but it was empty this time.

Bye bye Antonov. I hope see you again next time you visit. Mike

Great story, Mike!

Did they announce on local TV or you heard it by word of mouth?

I now will look to see how it compares to our large cargo planes.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old April 29th, 2018, 02:46 AM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Great story, Mike!

Did they announce on local TV or you heard it by word of mouth?

I now will look to see how it compares to our large cargo planes.

Asher
Read about it on a local news site. Had a bit of luck, however, by going to see the plane around midday even though the news site gave an evening take-off time. The take-off occurred at 1.00pm, so my timing was perfect.

Only the biggest Boeing 747 8 planes are heavier. These are enlarged versions of the 747.. The cargo version is the 8F that went into commercial operation in 2011.
Cheers
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old April 29th, 2018, 01:30 PM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
Administrator/Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 5,751
Default

Hmmm don't forget the Airbus A380 !
http://www.businessinsider.com/airbu...-shower-spa-26
__________________
WEBSITE - FACEBOOK - INSTAGRAM
Please do no repost my images elsewhere than OPF without my permission.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old April 29th, 2018, 04:59 PM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post
Hmmm don't forget the Airbus A380 !
http://www.businessinsider.com/airbu...-shower-spa-26
Wrong category, Nicholas. The Airbus A380 is a passenger plane. The Airbus cargo plane is the A300-600ST, known as the Beluga. The Beluga can carry just under 104,000 lbs. The Boeing 747-8 comes in variants that include cargo planes (the 8F) and passenger planes (the 8I). The HF cargo version can carry 308,000 lbs. The Antonov can carry 508,000 lbs of cargo, according to Wikipedia.
Cheers, Mike
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old April 30th, 2018, 12:50 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
Administrator/Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 5,751
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Stones View Post
Wrong category, Nicholas. The Airbus A380 is a passenger plane. The Airbus cargo plane is the A300-600ST, known as the Beluga. The Beluga can carry just under 104,000 lbs. The Boeing 747-8 comes in variants that include cargo planes (the 8F) and passenger planes (the 8I). The HF cargo version can carry 308,000 lbs. The Antonov can carry 508,000 lbs of cargo, according to Wikipedia.
Cheers, Mike
Oups! my bad! thanks for the clarification Michael!
As you see I don't know a lot about planes, they don't fly on the seawater : )
__________________
WEBSITE - FACEBOOK - INSTAGRAM
Please do no repost my images elsewhere than OPF without my permission.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old April 30th, 2018, 05:53 PM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post
Oups! my bad! thanks for the clarification Michael!
As you see I don't know a lot about planes, they don't fly on the seawater : )
You donít need a plane, Nicholas. Your wonderful photos of boats more than reach the sky.
Cheers
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old May 1st, 2018, 12:45 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
Administrator/Moderator
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Bordeaux
Posts: 5,751
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael_Stones View Post
You donít need a plane, Nicholas. Your wonderful photos of boats more than reach the sky.
Cheers
Mike
Wow! thank you Michael!
Then let me show you (sorry, completely OT) some models trying to flyÖ

__________________
WEBSITE - FACEBOOK - INSTAGRAM
Please do no repost my images elsewhere than OPF without my permission.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old May 2nd, 2018, 09:00 AM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post
Wow! thank you Michael!
Then let me show you (sorry, completely OT) some models trying to flyÖ

Ha Ha! They are flying high!

Cheers
Mike
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old May 7th, 2018, 04:22 PM
Don Ferguson Jr. Don Ferguson Jr. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 809
Default

Mike, cool shots of the plane. Did you get any shots of it flying ? Our Boeing Dreamlifter is comparable. There are four of them.


Cargo payload capability from Wikipedia :

330,000 lb. Antonov An-124
308,000 lb Boeing 747-8
250,000 lb Boeing Dreamlifter

285,000 lb. Lockheed C-5 Galaxy military plane, can be refueled in air unlike Antonov An-124.


Quote:
Boeing 787 parts were deemed too large for standard marine shipping containers as well as the Boeing 747-400F, Antonov An-124 and Antonov An-225. [8] Initially, three used passenger 747-400 aircraft were to be converted into an outsize configuration in order to ferry sub-assemblies from Japan and Italy to North Charleston, South Carolina, and then to Washington state for final assembly, but a fourth was subsequently added to the program.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Dreamlifter

Last edited by Don Ferguson Jr.; May 7th, 2018 at 08:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old May 8th, 2018, 06:05 PM
Michael_Stones Michael_Stones is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 666
Default

Hi Don. The choice was between closer range shots from within the terminal or a long shot after take-off. The former seemed the better choice. Cheers, Mike
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:36 AM.


Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet © of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion © 2006-2017 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!