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New Pro-Class Compact GR Ricoh Experience(s) A forum where pro and amateurs can share and discuss their experience(s) with the Ricoh GR

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  #1  
Old October 6th, 2013, 04:22 PM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Default Bowes Museum - Architecture w/ the GW-3 21mm

I was up in the north of England again this weekend, armed with my 21mm on the GR. This lens stood me in some real good stead in shooting the Bowes Museum, just outside the town of Barnard Castle.
Of course I had converging verticals coming out the ying-yang in this shot but they were simply corrected even with RICOH's Silkypix software that comes with the GR...

In taking this shot I felt very much like I was back in the early nineties when I was visiting and photographing national heritage, public stately homes and gardens...







Bowes Museum - Barnard Castle, Teesdale, Durham '13 - Paul Abbott
RICOH GR - GW-3 21mm Wide Conversion Lens
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  #2  
Old October 6th, 2013, 08:48 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
I was up in the north of England again this weekend, armed with my 21mm on the GR. This lens stood me in some real good stead in shooting the Bowes Museum, just outside the town of Barnard Castle.
Of course I had converging verticals coming out the ying-yang in this shot but they were simply corrected even with RICOH's Silkypix software that comes with the GR...

In taking this shot I felt very much like I was back in the early nineties when I was visiting and photographing national heritage, public stately homes and gardens...







Bowes Museum - Barnard Castle, Teesdale, Durham '13 - Paul Abbott
RICOH GR - GW-3 21mm Wide Conversion Lens

Paul,

This is rich and stately indeed. How much correction was needed to achieve this pretty perfect presentation.

Impressive but makes me a tad jealous. My 21mm has not arrived from Japan as of yet!

Asher
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  #3  
Old October 7th, 2013, 12:23 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Hey Asher, first of all it's great to hear your in the market for one of these lenses, you won't regret buying one.
Over on Dpreview one guy posted his findings with this lens and mentioned that it didn't have a screw-in thread on the front, but I can say that it certainly does and my step-up ring fits beautifully. It now opens up options for a better hood and filter.

Anyway, many thanks for your praise, Asher. The correction needed was -34 on the vertical slider.
In the past I had used some other crumby software but that left the image looking very flat, the software used here was great though.

I would like to get the DXO perspect correction software, that looks the business.
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  #4  
Old October 7th, 2013, 06:53 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
Hey Asher, first of all it's great to hear your in the market for one of these lenses, you won't regret buying one.
Over on Dpreview one guy posted his findings with this lens and mentioned that it didn't have a screw-in thread on the front, but I can say that it certainly does and my step-up ring fits beautifully. It now opens up options for a better hood and filter.

Anyway, many thanks for your praise, Asher. The correction needed was -34 on the vertical slider.
In the past I had used some other crumby software but that left the image looking very flat, the software used here was great though.

I would like to get the DXO perspect correction software, that looks the business.
Paul,

So, now I'll boot up Silkypix! I've never used it but one of our members has a PDF manual for it.

Asher
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  #5  
Old October 7th, 2013, 08:46 PM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Spectacular looking image !
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  #6  
Old October 7th, 2013, 08:47 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Paul,

So, now I'll boot up Silkypix! I've never used it but one of our members has a PDF manual for it.
Interestingly enough Silkypix Developer Studio 3.1 SE was provided with my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200, supposedly as its raw development facility.

I don't know how this relates to the app you are speaking of.

It looks as if what I have is an antique version, at best (4.0.88.0 seems to be current, and there is a Pro5 5.0.46.0); the "SE" probably means that it is a "lite" version, to boot.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #7  
Old October 8th, 2013, 01:26 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Thanks, James...

For a while I was trying to figure out how to actually save my processed RAW file as a Jpeg, it looked like I could only save as an spd file, whatever that is...Anyway, saving an image as a Jpeg is hidden in the development menu.
It takes a bit of getting used to really...
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  #8  
Old October 8th, 2013, 02:54 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
I was up in the north of England again this weekend, armed with my 21mm on the GR. This lens stood me in some real good stead in shooting the Bowes Museum, just outside the town of Barnard Castle.
Hi Paul,

It's looking good. You apparently are getting an appetite for colour images as well.

Quote:
Of course I had converging verticals coming out the ying-yang in this shot but they were simply corrected even with RICOH's Silkypix software that comes with the GR...
FYI, it seems like support for the GR was added to the Capture One Pro 7.1.4 Raw converter as well. The general conversion quality of CO is very high, and it also offers keystone corrections and things like Chromatic Aberration correction.

Cheers,
Bart
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  #9  
Old October 8th, 2013, 04:39 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Paul,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
I was up in the north of England again this weekend, armed with my 21mm on the GR. This lens stood me in some real good stead in shooting the Bowes Museum, just outside the town of Barnard Castle.
Of course I had converging verticals coming out the ying-yang in this shot but they were simply corrected even with RICOH's Silkypix software that comes with the GR...
Beautiful shot.

The absolutely parallel verticals, a conceit of "architectural" photography, to me make it look a bit "unnatural", like a portrait that is absolutely laterally symmetrical.

But I'm not sure what would have been "better".

Best regards,

Doug
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  #10  
Old October 8th, 2013, 04:45 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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Regarding software, because of the 645D I had to move from my beloved C1 to LR as C1 does not support the raw files from the 645. Therefore it was easier for me to use LR to develop the GR raw files. I tried C1 for the GR's but found that the result was not as good as from LR, I guess the support by C1 is not 100%…
Oh, and BTW I had also Sylkypix delivered with both the 645 and the GR. I tried it once. Once is enough…
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  #11  
Old October 8th, 2013, 06:02 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Hey Doug, I don't think it's anything fancy to correct verticals in 'architectural' photography, especially the ones that come from a 21mm lens. In this shot, the converging verticals were more unnatural really...
I know what I prefer...

Anyway, thanks for your comment, you've made me think more about why we correct these things.

Regards...
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  #12  
Old October 8th, 2013, 06:16 AM
Bart_van_der_Wolf Bart_van_der_Wolf is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
Hey Doug, I don't think it's anything fancy to correct verticals in 'architectural' photography, especially the ones that come from a 21mm lens. In this shot, the converging verticals were more unnatural really...
I know what I prefer...

Anyway, thanks for your comment, you've made me think more about why we correct these things.
Hi Paul,

There's more that can be said about correcting converging verticals, AKA 'keystoning'. The better software solutions allow to under-correct the correction. Capture One, and the more recent version of DxO 'ViewPoint', and the new Adobe 'Upright', allow to dial in a percentage of correction, and usually something in the 80-90% range will look much more natural than 100%. When using a Panostitcher for correction, one can use a slightly elevated (above horizon) vanishing point.

Cheers,
Bart
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  #13  
Old October 8th, 2013, 06:48 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Paul,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
Hey Doug, I don't think it's anything fancy to correct verticals in 'architectural' photography, especially the ones that come from a 21mm lens. In this shot, the converging verticals were more unnatural really...
I know what I prefer...
At least today!

Quote:
Anyway, thanks for your comment, you've made me think more about why we correct these things.
Well, that's what I do!

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #14  
Old October 8th, 2013, 02:05 PM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Hey Doug, watch this space. This lens has inspired me to get back to photographing stately homes and gardens. I used to do it back in the mid-nineties roaming around the home counties with a Canon EOS 5 film camera but I could never afford a tilt/ shift lens for it.

Anyway, I will soon be moving to west Yorkshire and living in that part of England. God knows there are some grand properties up there to be photographed, Castle Howard and Chatsworth House to name a couple...
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  #15  
Old October 8th, 2013, 03:34 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Paul,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Abbott View Post
Hey Doug, watch this space. This lens has inspired me to get back to photographing stately homes and gardens. I used to do it back in the mid-nineties roaming around the home counties with a Canon EOS 5 film camera but I could never afford a tilt/ shift lens for it.
Looking forward to it.

Quote:
Anyway, I will soon be moving to west Yorkshire . .
Ah, the land of peasant hunting!

Quote:
. . . and living in that part of England. God knows there are some grand properties up there to be photographed, Castle Howard and Chatsworth House to name a couple...
Again, I look forward to seeing your work. And best of luck on your relocation (removal?).

Best regards,

Doug
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  #16  
Old October 8th, 2013, 05:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Hi, Paul,



Beautiful shot.

The absolutely parallel verticals, a conceit of "architectural" photography, to me make it look a bit "unnatural", ...........

So what might you think of a "God shot" looking down from the sky at us, also unnatural ... or I suppose supernatural. The convention for architecture is to show buildings appearing orthogonal in the front face, as if they are seen from great distance with no obvious distortion.

That way, the buildings "orthodoxy", (or call it orthogonality of it's front plane), removes it's aura from the b.g. of the picture and becomes much more noticeable. So it works, seeing that the main subject of the photograph is indeed the building.

I like the effect. Yes, it's a conceit, but no different that a hospital physician wearing a white coat. They stand out!

Asher
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  #17  
Old October 8th, 2013, 06:02 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post

That way, the buildings "orthodoxy", (or call it orthogonality of it's front plane), removes it's aura from the b.g. of the picture and becomes much more noticeable.
I find that hard to believe. With a slight convergence of the verticals, the building is "less noticeable"? Wow!

Maybe what people notice is that it looks "unnatural".

Best regards,

Doug
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  #18  
Old October 8th, 2013, 09:11 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Hi, Asher,



I find that hard to believe. With a slight convergence of the verticals, the building is "less noticeable"? Wow!

Maybe what people notice is that it looks "unnatural".

Best regards,

Doug
Doug,

With no correction, the building will look less differentiated from the b.g. That's because it's what the eye normally sees too. When it's corrected, folk pay more attention but don't realize that the building is corrected, rather that is seems somehow more important or significant.

Asher
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  #19  
Old October 9th, 2013, 12:34 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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In serious architectural photography it's the prominence and stature of a building that needs to be shown and therefore have it's verticals corrected.
I know I have photographed architectural stuff in the past but mostly in an exaggerated perspective, using a different aspect and different to what i've done here...

Anyway, I will post an uncorrected image. Give me some time, it's the morning here, I need to be corrected 'cos i've only just got...'up'.
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  #20  
Old October 9th, 2013, 03:56 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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As you can see this is wart's and all, no processing has been applied to this at all. Also, I had to tidy the garden in my original.






Bowes Museum - 'Uncorrected'
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  #21  
Old October 9th, 2013, 04:23 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
With no correction, the building will look less differentiated from the b.g. That's because it's what the eye normally sees too. When it's corrected, folk pay more attention but don't realize that the building is corrected, rather that is seems somehow more important or significant.
I understand.

Your earlier play on "orthodoxy" was very apt!

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #22  
Old October 9th, 2013, 08:57 AM
Paul Abbott Paul Abbott is offline
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Btw Doug, thanks for your regards in my move...relocating to the countryside is what i'll be doing. I shall miss my London town, that's for sure.
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