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  #1  
Old September 4th, 2018, 09:56 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Default My choice of cameras and reasons!



Asher Kelman: The Great Hall, University of Birmingham U.K.

2017, Ricoh GR GXR APS-C "50mm Lens-Sensor module"
1/2000 sec f= 7.1 ISO 320 3 Images Stitched in Auto Pano Giga



Why choose a particular camera?

What needs just had to be covered?

What cameras have you chosen in your career and why that type, brand, size and expense?

....any surprises and/regrets?

Asher
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; October 21st, 2018 at 10:07 PM.
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  #2  
Old September 4th, 2018, 02:33 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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I just like to cite the following interview I found on the web:


Frank Horvat : What about the camera? It seems that you donít have the same camera as everyone else, a Leica, a Nikon or a Kodak.

Mario Giacomelli : I donít know about other peopleís cameras. Mine is a thing I had cobbled up, it holds together with tape and is always losing parts. All I need to set is the distance and that other thing Ė what do you call that other thing? Iím not a fan of mechanics. I have had this camera, still the same one, since I started taking photos. It has lived with me, shared many moments of my existence, both good and bad. If I ever lost itÖ well, the very idea of having to live without it pulls at my heart.

Frank Horvat : But where does it come from?

Mario Giacomelli : I had it made. By dismantling a camera given to me by a friend and removing whatever seemed useless. I only need distance and that other thing Ė whatís that other thing called again? I donít know how these machines work, what counts is that light shouldnít get in. Itís just a box.

Frank Horvat : And what film do you use?

Mario Giacomelli : Whatever I get.

Frank Horvat : 24 by 36 millimeters?

Mario Giacomelli : Donít ask me about millimeters ! I use the larger film, not the smaller one. Iíve never used the smaller one.

Frank Horvat : So, six by six centimeters?

Mario Giacomelli : Donít talk to me about figures! I only know that six by nine becomes six by eight and a half.

Frank Horvat : So you get 12 photos per roll?

Mario Giacomelli : I canít remember, but I think itís more like ten. Ten, not twelve. Whatís important is that there shouldnít be too many. Once I won a competition and was given a small size camera as a prize. But I didnít know how to use it, it was too fast for me, it didnít participate as my own camera does, it left me no time to think, made me press the shutter for nothing. I felt deprived of what makes my greatest joy, which is the waiting, the preparing of the image, the winding of the film, the replacing of the roll. My own camera is exactly what I need, it suits my character.

Frank Horvat : At what speed does it work? a thirtieth, a hundredth of a second?

Mario Giacomelli : I donít know any more. It doesnít go over two hundred. To photograph from a plane I have to borrow a friendís camera, Iím a little ashamed to admit it, but I donít care. It doesnít matter to me, I would take photos without a camera if I could. Iíve no great passion for mechanics.

Frank Horvat : And whatís the lens aperture?

Mario Giacomelli : It depends. At Scanno, I did nearly everything at a 25th. For landscapes I use 2 and 22.

Frank Horvat : Half a second at aperture 22?

Mario Giacomelli : I know there is a 2 and a 22, thatís the aperture of the lens, I learnt it by heart.

Frank Horvat : So you close the aperture all the way.

Mario Giacomelli : All the way, always the same. Because itís for landscapes. When itís for people, and there is not much light, I do the opposite : I open the lens.


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  #3  
Old September 4th, 2018, 03:08 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Wonderful interview, Jerome.

My favorite is this curved plane pinhole camera by Kurt Mottweiler.
















Kurt Mottweiler: P.90 6x7 Camera




I borrowed a P.90 and had so much fun using it. I have shown this shot previously:

Well this is Kodak 160 NC-2film, 6x7 format, just a simple lab 6MP commercial scan 8BIT TIFF and curves and sharpened. Not cropped. Not corrected for distortion or bright b.g. Don't let that worry you for now






© 2007 Asher Kelman My Favorite Tree, Los Angeles 2007




No view finder, just two lines on the top indicated angle of view! No focusing. Only one f-stop!

One can have any shutter speed one approximate with pull of a rod up and down at the speed one imagines,

one second being:

ONE-ANSEL ADAMS

and 2 second being:

ďONE-ANSEL ADAMS, TWO-ANSEL ADAMSĒ and so forth!

Asher
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  #4  
Old September 5th, 2018, 09:05 PM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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As a boy I was especially intrigued by the Polaroid camera and the noise it made when producing a picture. It was like Magic to me! But I was equally amazed when they invented the phone with a camera in it.
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  #5  
Old September 6th, 2018, 03:45 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
As a boy I was especially intrigued by the Polaroid camera and the noise it made when producing a picture. It was like Magic to me! But I was equally amazed when they invented the phone with a camera in it.
Yes, that was lots of fun! Sad that the era of Polaroid ended. Now itís just a label they rent out to shoddy copiers made somewhere in Asia!

Asher
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  #6  
Old September 6th, 2018, 06:41 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Yes, that was lots of fun! Sad that the era of Polaroid ended. Now itís just a label they rent out to shoddy copiers made somewhere in Asia!
There is still a Dutch company manufacturing Polaroid compatible films and cameras...
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  #7  
Old September 6th, 2018, 05:34 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
There is still a Dutch company manufacturing Polaroid compatible films and cameras...
Yes, Jerome, they are working very hard. Unfortunately they havenít mastered as yet the brilliance of the original instant Polaroid films. I have nothing but admiration for them. Itís still so wonderful to have this choice of media.

I have a bunch of ďexpiredĒ but original Polaroid 8x10 film in my refrigerator. Must do a session usin then and see how the film comes out!

Asher
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  #8  
Old October 18th, 2018, 12:53 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
As a boy I was especially intrigued by the Polaroid camera and the noise it made when producing a picture. It was like Magic to me! But I was equally amazed when they invented the phone with a camera in it.
When the phones with camera first came out years ago there was cartoon in the New Yorker showing a man on the street with a phone to his ear. In the caption he says "Hold on a second, I think I just took another picture of my ear".
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  #9  
Old October 17th, 2018, 08:59 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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For me, thereís one special camera for my Studio where I want to be able to make prints that folk can approach very close and not lose the magical feeling of the presence of the person. A Canon 5DII doesnít quite make the grade but few folk notice. The Sony A7R lunches way above it class (and frankly I get hardly better images from the Phase One IQ80). Likely, others could process their own images into the same class. I have switched to the new Fuji MF camera, GFX mirrorless, as the lenses are stellar and the standard zoom lens is perfect for my needs.

For photoprogammetry or panoramas for a client, any modern camera with little distortion and a solid tripod.

For street photography something black and inconspicuous like the Ricoh GR, (genuine film or recent Digital) (Instead one could use a Sony or Fuji Co pact camera to ones taste).

....... and for a romantic philosophical treat a large format camera on a tripod and either cliffs, sand dunes, a waterfall, a model or all of them! A pinhole camera will do the same! Anyone agree?

The issue for professional work is that one needs a backup camera and a reproducible workflow. I realize we should make use of rental houses more and resist the temptation to have to own everything one ďneedsĒ!

Asher
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  #10  
Old October 18th, 2018, 08:26 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Almost all of my current photography goes onto the Internet, mostly onto Carla's blog, some onto this forum, generally resized to a maximum dimension of 800 px for delivery. So, many of the demands on image quality are relaxed (perhaps sadly).

And because my mobility is a bit compromised from spinal stenosis, I found that schlepping a larger camera system doesn't work well. I offloaded my stable of Canon DSLR's and EF lenses, and moved to the world of non-interchangeable lens mirrorless cameras, potentially considerably smaller and lighter.

But, just as when in our first "downsizing" we moved into a house the same size, my current "major" camera, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000, is as big and heavy as a mid-range Canon DSLR with a 50 mm lens aboard. It is a full-featured non-interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with a "one inch" sensor (20 Mpx). The lens has a focal length range of 25-400 mm ff35 equivalent, with an maximum aperture range of f/2.8-f/4.0 (f/2.8 . It is very responsive and has very complete and flexible controls. It does a fairly good job in low-light conditions.

But of course I really did need something that was actually smaller. Its stable mate, physically very much smaller (it can easily go into my pocket) has the very same sensor and processing chain. It is a Panasonic Lumix DMX-ZS100. Its lens has a focal length range of 25-250 mm ff35 equivalent, with an maximum aperture range of f/2.8-f/5.9. Its controls are as flexible as those of its cousin, although the smaller package gives fewer buttons to assign to things.

The lens on the FZ1000 is superior in many ways to that on the ZS100 (squeezing a lens with that focal length range, feeding a sensor of that size, into a very small package obviously brings some compromises). But it responds well and does a passable job in very low light situations.

Carla most of the time uses our Canon PowerShot G16 (about the same size as the ZS100. It has a much smaller sensor and a more modest focal length range, but its lens is excellent. She thinks the pictures are generally better than those from the ZS100. She's probably right.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #11  
Old October 18th, 2018, 11:43 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Almost all of my current photography goes onto the Internet, mostly onto Carla's blog, some onto this forum, generally resized to a maximum dimension of 800 px for delivery. So, many of the demands on image quality are relaxed (perhaps sadly).

And because my mobility is a bit compromised from spinal stenosis, I found that schlepping a larger camera system doesn't work well. I offloaded my stable of Canon DSLR's and EF lenses, and moved to the world of non-interchangeable lens mirrorless cameras, potentially considerably smaller and lighter.

But, just as when in our first "downsizing" we moved into a house the same size, my current "major" camera, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000, is as big and heavy as a mid-range Canon DSLR with a 50 mm lens aboard. It is a full-featured non-interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with a "one inch" sensor (20 Mpx). The lens has a focal length range of 25-400 mm ff35 equivalent, with an maximum aperture range of f/2.8-f/4.0 (f/2.8 . It is very responsive and has very complete and flexible controls. It does a fairly good job in low-light conditions.

But of course I really did need something that was actually smaller. Its stable mate, physically very much smaller (it can easily go into my pocket) has the very same sensor and processing chain. It is a Panasonic Lumix DMX-ZS100. Its lens has a focal length range of 25-250 mm ff35 equivalent, with an maximum aperture range of f/2.8-f/5.9. Its controls are as flexible as those of its cousin, although the smaller package gives fewer buttons to assign to things.

The lens on the FZ1000 is superior in many ways to that on the ZS100 (squeezing a lens with that focal length range, feeding a sensor of that size, into a very small package obviously brings some compromises). But it responds well and does a passable job in very low light situations.

Carla most of the time uses our Canon PowerShot G16 (about the same size as the ZS100. It has a much smaller sensor and a more modest focal length range, but its lens is excellent. She thinks the pictures are generally better than those from the ZS100. She's probably right.

Best regards,

Doug
I suggest a used GRII 28 mm in one pocket. It's APS-C , ultra sharp lens, and you can crop and enlarge. This will handle 95% of your needs with applomb!

In another pocket or in Carla's purse something light with a longer lens

Asher
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  #12  
Old October 18th, 2018, 12:22 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I suggest a used GRII 28 mm in one pocket. It's APS-C , ultra sharp lens, and you can crop and enlarge. This will handle 95% of your needs with applomb!

In another pocket or in Carla's purse something light with a longer lens
That's a very tempting notion. I may look into that.

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #13  
Old October 18th, 2018, 12:29 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Kerr View Post
Hi, Asher,



That's a very tempting notion. I may look into that.

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
Doug,

The new GRIII will be out in 2-3 months and the price of the Perfectly fabulous GRII will drop 10% and then be stable. Or you can by a demo model or ďRefurbishedĒ which is essentially the same or brand new but over-produced for that market at a particular delivery cycle!

That camera, (like Pro Nikon or Pro Canon long lenses), is actually ďmoney in the bankĒ, that you use for fun right now and essentially almost for free), as it will retain 80% its value relatively well!

It is a metal pro-level sturdy little camera that wont intimidate anyone. The addon 21mm supplementary lens is nothing less than superb! Agreed it has no telephoto ďreachĒ but, it is so brilliant at what it does, that one can forget whatís missing.

Really, we have to celebrate and respect what god has given us. Woman and the GR are such gifts!

Asher
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  #14  
Old October 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I suggest a used GRII 28 mm in one pocket. It's APS-C , ultra sharp lens, and you can crop and enlarge.
It is not a replacement for a zoom P&S. But if we want to suggest an APS-C camera, I am partial to the Sigma DP Merrill series. At least, a camera that is markedly different. They are quite cheap used.

If the frame needs to be full ("Kleinbild" or 8 "thirds"...), nothing electronics beats the Sony RX1 and its lens is superb.
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  #15  
Old October 18th, 2018, 06:50 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
It is not a replacement for a zoom P&S. But if we want to suggest an APS-C camera, I am partial to the Sigma DP Merrill series. At least, a camera that is markedly different. They are quite cheap used.

If the frame needs to be full ("Kleinbild" or 8 "thirds"...), nothing electronics beats the Sony RX1 and its lens is superb.
Jerome,

I am not as succinct as you, but I love of your recommendations: both superb and should make anyone a prince, (nice one, LOL)!

The RX1 has such a fine lens and great sensor that it can almost replace a zoom, at least in my hands! It is essentially a 42MP Pro camera squeezed into a pocketable digicam with a superb fixed 50 mm lens. This one camera could pretty well replace all my cameras if I wanted just one simple solution. Wide angle by stitching overlapped frames, telephoto by cropping and enlarging with the new Topaz filter if need be!


The Sigma Merrill is essentially portable MF quality magic for folk who pay attention to good lighting!

Asher
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  #16  
Old October 18th, 2018, 07:17 PM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
For me, thereís one special camera for my Studio where I want to be able to make prints that folk can approach very close and not lose the magical feeling of the presence of the person. A Canon 5DII doesnít quite make the grade but few folk notice. The Sony A7R lunches way above it class (and frankly I get hardly better images from the Phase One IQ80). Likely, others could process their own images into the same class. I have switched to the new Fuji MF camera, GFX mirrorless, as the lenses are stellar and the standard zoom lens is perfect for my needs.

For photoprogammetry or panoramas for a client, any modern camera with little distortion and a solid tripod.

For street photography something black and inconspicuous like the Ricoh GR, (genuine film or recent Digital) (Instead one could use a Sony or Fuji Co pact camera to ones taste).

....... and for a romantic philosophical treat a large format camera on a tripod and either cliffs, sand dunes, a waterfall, a model or all of them! A pinhole camera will do the same! Anyone agree?

The issue for professional work is that one needs a backup camera and a reproducible workflow. I realize we should make use of rental houses more and resist the temptation to have to own everything one ďneedsĒ!

Asher
You can not beat a medium format or large format print from a film camera. Yes digital has surpassed 35mm film format but would have a long ways to go to catch up to medium,large format film. Especially if you want to produce nude pictures the size of billboards
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  #17  
Old October 19th, 2018, 12:07 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
You can not beat a medium format or large format print from a film camera. Yes digital has surpassed 35mm film format but would have a long ways to go to catch up to medium,large format film. Especially if you want to produce nude pictures the size of billboards
Comparing dissimilar media is difficult, but my comparison of prints displayed in museum and galleries makes me believe that the best digital 24x36 cameras are comparable to medium format film. I have not seen the output from recent digital MF cameras, but earlier CCD models were also excellent.

The Sigma Merrill is an interesting camera, but not MF quality.
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  #18  
Old October 19th, 2018, 09:43 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Comparing dissimilar media is difficult, but my comparison of prints displayed in museum and galleries makes me believe that the best digital 24x36 cameras are comparable to medium format film. I have not seen the output from recent digital MF cameras, but earlier CCD models were also excellent.

The Sigma Merrill is an interesting camera, but not MF quality.

My reasoning is that a larger sensor gathers more light.
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  #19  
Old October 19th, 2018, 11:42 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, James,

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
My reasoning is that a larger sensor gathers more light.
Well, indeed, if we are shooting with the same aperture (that is, same f-number), for a given scene the total luminous flux on the sensor is proportional to the area of the sensor.

And of course if we have the same field of view on two cameras, the one with the larger sensor will need a greater entrance pupil of the lens to attain that same f-number. And so the lens will probably be bigger and heavier.

And for the same f-number, for focus at the same distance, the camera with the larger sensor will exhibit a smaller depth of field (if reckoned on a "visual acuity" basis), which of course is good for some things and bad for others.

So as always, more is - more, or less (more or less).

Best regards,

Doug
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  #20  
Old October 20th, 2018, 02:52 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Lemon View Post
My reasoning is that a larger sensor gathers more light.
As Doug explained, things are a bit more complex. Light is gathered by the lens. Most film medium format lens are not very fast, so the camera does not gather more light than a smaller one.

You could also see it in the following manner. For film cameras, the same "sensor" (the same film) was used in different sizes. The exposure of the film needed to be exactly the same or the film would be over- or underexposed. Therefore, per unit of surface, all cameras needed to gather the same amount or light (for a given film sensitivity).

Under these assumptions, a camera with film twice as large would "gather twice as much light". Is that what you meant?
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  #21  
Old October 18th, 2018, 06:15 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Is there an illustration of what the added optical viewfinder would look like on the GRIII? The inclusion of a view finder was one of the principal reasons why I chose the Panasonic Lumix LF-1 when I purchased it. 95 % of point and shoot images I take are outside. I've yet to see an LCD screen that would produce a usable image in bright daylight. I gather the Richoh also lacks flash so no fill flash with out an add on external unit. Adding those two items would probably compromise its pocketability.
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  #22  
Old October 18th, 2018, 06:46 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
Is there an illustration of what the added optical viewfinder would look like on the GRIII? The inclusion of a view finder was one of the principal reasons why I chose the Panasonic Lumix LF-1 when I purchased it. 95 % of point and shoot images I take are outside. I've yet to see an LCD screen that would produce a usable image in bright daylight. I gather the Richoh also lacks flash so no fill flash with out an add on external unit. Adding those two items would probably compromise its pocketability.
The GR series has a pop up flash. The electronic viewfinder for the Gx/GFX series cannot mount to the GRII as it lacks the electronic port. Any $36 upwards viewfinder from Amazon or eBay will work
As this is a common wish of digicam users. I have one but I need to find it! Works perfectly!

Asher
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  #23  
Old October 19th, 2018, 12:01 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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The RX1 (first and second models) has a 35mm lens, not 50mm.
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  #24  
Old October 19th, 2018, 12:10 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
The RX1 (first and second models) has a 35mm lens, not 50mm.
Of course! Thanks for the key correction!

Better that way!

Asher
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  #25  
Old October 19th, 2018, 06:01 AM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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According to this the GR III has no built in flash:

https://www.dpreview.com/news/791278...awaited-gr-iii

The Sony RX VI and Ricoh GR III are almost equal in size and weight but the Sony does have a built in flash. It also has an articulating screen which is useful when you want to take a picture of something very low like an insect or flower or be able to hold it over your head for a shot. The one area where the Ricoch might beat the Sony is image quality and sharpness with it's fixed lens vs, zoom but the jury will remain out until full testing of the Richoh. The difference between 20 and 24 mp isn't significant in my opinion.
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  #26  
Old October 21st, 2018, 10:13 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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[QUOTE=Asher Kelman;186326]


Asher Kelman: The Great Hall, University of Birmingham U.K.

2017, Ricoh GR GXR APS-C "50mm Lens-Sensor module"
1/2000 sec f= 7.1 ISO 320 3 Images Stitched in Auto Pano Giga



Why did I choose this particular camera?

I liked the stellar 50 mm lens and sealed sensor to match. I have 2 zoom modules for near and far. I need the APS-C model at 28mm to complete my happiness.

I mostly just use the 50mm as it is fairly small and the electronic eye viewfinder means that the back LCD does not light up in a concert!

I would love to see updates to the sensors!

Asher
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  #27  
Old October 22nd, 2018, 06:33 PM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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[QUOTE=Asher Kelman;187512]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post


Asher Kelman: The Great Hall, University of Birmingham U.K.

2017, Ricoh GR GXR APS-C "50mm Lens-Sensor module"
1/2000 sec f= 7.1 ISO 320 3 Images Stitched in Auto Pano Giga



Why did I choose this particular camera?

I liked the stellar 50 mm lens and sealed sensor to match. I have 2 zoom modules for near and far. I need the APS-C model at 28mm to complete my happiness.

I mostly just use the 50mm as it is fairly small and the electronic eye viewfinder means that the back LCD does not light up in a concert!

I would love to see updates to the sensors!

Asher

Nice photo Asher! That is an ominous looking sky, it appears as though something diabolical is about to happen.

Best, regards
James
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  #28  
Old October 22nd, 2018, 06:39 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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[QUOTE=James Lemon;187532]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post


Nice photo Asher! That is an ominous looking sky, it appears as though something diabolical is about to happen.

Best, regards
James
Yes,

They developed key separations for the first atom bomb and transfusions among other shocking matters!

Most of the witches in the world still look up to the old lady who showed the world how to prepare Digitalis from the foxgloves of the woodlands, close by! She made Sir William withering famous!

Asher
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Old October 22nd, 2018, 01:08 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Jerome,

You are right pointing out the discrepancy. In fact you are mostly always pretty well on the mark.

But perhaps we get to forgive the Zeiss by having a 500GB SSD built in and a 4Ē screen.

It will have to really work well with Lightroom to be worthwhile as itís essentially a pregnant mobile with no phone function butca dsmn good lens!

We understand the RX1. Itís an advance on existing camera forms we are so used to and we really donít mind using SD cards. We just like 2 slots if possible.

For fun, having filters on a mobile phone works. But a camera meant to be a portable hardy pro camera better be able to do professional processing to justify the bulk compared to the highly refined and compact RX1.

It could just be that the physical design is so practical with a handgrip and the menu and controls so intuitive that the size actually is what translates into a professional user experience that makes it all so obviously worthwhile. That is yet to be demonstrated!

Asher
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  #30  
Old October 22nd, 2018, 06:13 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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From a style standpoint, the Zeiss ZX1 looks like what an industrial designer in the "good old days" might have carved out of balsa wood (and then spray painted) to show colleagues the first general concept of his new design. "You see, over here we can fit the battery."

Best regards,

Doug
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