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  #1  
Old October 1st, 2018, 03:58 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Default The Venezuelans

The economic crisis in Venezuela has provoked a mass exodus to Colombia. More than three thousand a day (some reports put the figure at six thousand) are crossing into Colombia daly and there are now reportedly a million in the country. Their supposed goal is to continue on to Peru and points south where they believe the economy to be better than Colombia. Recently in Cali there were a couple of hundred camped out outside the city bus terminal. They were there for months, some seeking work but all looking for money to continue on. The city eventually managed to bus many of them south to the Ecuador border. The people are desperate. Women crossing the bridge into Colombia often sell their hair to Colombians who purchase it to sell to beauty salons in Cali and other big cities to be used in fashionable and costly hair extensions. A friend in a village a couple of hours from Cali says there are now Venezuelan girls in the bars there who sell themselves for about $2.50 US ( undercutting and angering the local women). In Cali Venezuelans are now everywhere. Some have found work but many like the fellow in the photo beg for assistance at the traffic lights. His sign says:

"We are a Venezuelan family
Help us with what God puts
in your hearts your help is a
great help for my children
that my God blesses you
thank you"

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  #2  
Old October 1st, 2018, 04:21 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
The economic crisis in Venezuela has provoked a mass exodus to Colombia. More than three thousand a day (some reports put the figure at six thousand) are crossing into Colombia daly and there are now reportedly a million in the country. Their supposed goal is to continue on to Peru and points south where they believe the economy to be better than Colombia. Recently in Cali there were a couple of hundred camped out outside the city bus terminal. They were there for months, some seeking work but all looking for money to continue on. The city eventually managed to bus many of them south to the Ecuador border. The people are desperate. Women crossing the bridge into Colombia often sell their hair to Colombians who purchase it to sell to beauty salons in Cali and other big cities to be used in fashionable and costly hair extensions. A friend in a village a couple of hours from Cali says there are now Venezuelan girls in the bars there who sell themselves for about $2.50 US ( undercutting and angering the local women). In Cali Venezuelans are now everywhere. Some have found work but many like the fellow in the photo beg for assistance at the traffic lights. His sign says:

"We are a Venezuelan family
Help us with what God puts
in your hearts your help is a
great help for my children
that my God blesses you
thank you"





This is so tragic, Peter! We have excess food!

South America should also have unlimited food. Venezuela has oil! This is so horrible, I competant and cruel!

What on earth is happening!


How can they feed the people!


What stops these girls getting sick or pregnant?


Asher
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  #3  
Old October 1st, 2018, 04:22 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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.....and what does Ecuador think of the present Colombia is bussing to their border?

Asher
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  #4  
Old October 1st, 2018, 04:42 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Well nothing stops these girls from getting sick or pregnant. The Venezuelans are leaving their country because it has become difficult to get food, the store shelves are empty. Some are starving .They also can no longer get needed drugs or medical care. There is no such food or medical supply shortage in the other South American countries. The government at least of Ecuador seems to be sympathetic and anyway it apparently isn't the intended final destination.
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  #5  
Old October 1st, 2018, 09:52 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Are we doing anything for them?
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  #6  
Old October 2nd, 2018, 05:13 AM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Well there was talk of US aide but I don't know what came of it.
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  #7  
Old October 3rd, 2018, 01:39 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Are we doing anything for them?
There is an article about the crisis by the BBC https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36319877.

It basically says that Venezuela difficulties comes from relying too much on oil exports Except, that it does not explain why the difference with other countries which rely on oil exports, e.g. Saudi Arabia.

So, if your question was "Is the USA doing anything for the Venezuela crisis?", I think that the answer is unfortunately yes: https://venezuelanalysis.com/news/13833.
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  #8  
Old October 3rd, 2018, 07:12 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
There is an article about the crisis by the BBC https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-36319877.

It basically says that Venezuela difficulties comes from relying too much on oil exports Except, that it does not explain why the difference with other countries which rely on oil exports, e.g. Saudi Arabia.

So, if your question was "Is the USA doing anything for the Venezuela crisis?", I think that the answer is unfortunately yes: https://venezuelanalysis.com/news/13833.
I can understand how sanctions can hurt the Venezuelan economy further. But surely this predates Trump? The US has been traditionally hostile to sociastic movements. In fact, one could almost predict that a country championed a cheered on by Noam Chomsky would be likely to be an a serious “enemy” of the USA. It would be expected that a leadership that espoused revolutionary anti capitalist policies would in effect have separated itself, aitomatically from the US markets.

So we have two issues.

1. The practical problems and risks for launching a radically socialist society and opposing Western Capitalism.

2. The moral imperative of coming to the aid of folk bereft of the resources of life, for whatever reason.

To most of us, the former is, (sad to observe), obviously trounced by the latter. And with Trump, (unless commerce from a such a revolutionary passion puts money in his pockets, expect the wrath of US policy falling on the Venezuelan people.


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  #9  
Old October 3rd, 2018, 07:28 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Peter and Bob Watcher,

Any more pictures that you can find dealing with the poor of South America, will help us to reverse the fortunes of a the suffering poor.

Asher
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  #10  
Old October 3rd, 2018, 11:07 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
I can understand how sanctions can hurt the Venezuelan economy further. But surely this predates Trump?
Yes, it does. Maybe you will enjoy the Wikipedia article about over 100 years of complicated USA-Venezuela relations.

And don't forget that Venezuela has oil. Plenty.
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  #11  
Old October 3rd, 2018, 04:37 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Asher will do. I gave an inkling to the issues in Colombia in my post "Another Protest In Cali". I can't speak for other Latin American countries but regarding the economy of Colombia the minimum salary in dollars is approximately $266 a month. This is earned by about 54% of the population. Many if not most of these earners add "informal" employment to their "day job" selling various products in the street or to neighbors.There is a growing middle class some of whom may earn the equivalent of seven or eight hundred US. However there is much discrepancy. The salary of a Colombian congressman this year is the equivalent of $10,700 US. And that doesn't compare with the enormous sums received by the top drug traffickers. Cocain production levels are at an all time high this year with concomitent exports. Some are savvy and get that money to banks in Panama but a lot of it enters and bestirs (or runs) the Colombian economy. Probably 30% of the outlets, maybe more in the upscale shopping centers of Bogota, Cali and Medellin are just open to launder drug money. It is the land of Garcia Marquez' " "Macondo".

Of course there is good with the bad, often astonishing. Do you remember there were three Amarican contractors captured by the Colombian FARC guerrilla when their plane crashed in 2003 who were then held for five years along with Colombian presidential candidate Ingrid Betencour (captured in a different encounter)? Their rescue could have been invented in Hollywood. A FARC commander where they were held was duped into thinking the captives were to be transferred to a different camp. An NGO helicopter from a European country was to be supplied for the transfer. Months before the rescue was carried out some Colombian military were sent to acting school to learn to speak Spanish with European accents. They were aboard the helicopter and were the ones who spoke to the FARC on the ground when it landed to collect the hostages. The operation could easily have been a complete disaster with the FARC shooting everyone to smithereens had they suspected a trick but they bought it and the helicopter lifted off with the hostages aboard. A report from The Guardian shortly after the rescue:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/jul/06/colombia
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  #12  
Old October 6th, 2018, 01:49 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Today I stopped at a traffic light where a number of Venezuelan migrants were asking for assistance. One of them went down the line of waiting cars placing bolivar notes on peoples' windshields hoping the driver would give him a few pesos to keep the note as a souvenir. I made a donation and kept three. I think they are quite attractive with representations on the front of Venezuelan historical figures Primer Negro, Luisa Caseres Arismendi and Francisco De Miranda, the latter quite interesting. On the back are a dolphin species,Hawksbill sea turtle and Giant Armadillow.

In August President Nicolas Maduro carried out yet another devaluation of the Venezuelan Bolivar considered one of the greatest monetary devaluations inhibitory. The official exchange rate went from 285,000 bolivars to the US dollar to 6 million.



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Old October 7th, 2018, 12:14 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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I would love some of that interesting and sad money.

Can I send you $$ to get some for me too?

Asher
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  #14  
Old October 7th, 2018, 04:51 AM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Asher as it happens I am going to the US tomorrow and will be happy to send you the bills (sending anything from here is costly). Just give me your mailing address and I will post them to you this week. No charge.
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Old October 7th, 2018, 08:46 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Wow!

That’s so generous of you! I hope we might even meet!

Asher
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  #16  
Old October 7th, 2018, 09:10 AM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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Asher I'm having internet problems and can't seem to reply to your message. Anyway will send on Tuesday, staying in Missouri returning on Saturday. I give them something from time to time, don't worry.
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  #17  
Old October 7th, 2018, 11:10 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Thanks!

Your message came through fine!

Asher
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  #18  
Old October 7th, 2018, 12:51 PM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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Peter, a very very sad situational report.

But it must be reported.

Thank you.
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  #19  
Old October 8th, 2018, 09:18 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
Today I stopped at a traffic light where a number of Venezuelan migrants were asking for assistance. One of them went down the line of waiting cars placing bolivar notes on peoples' windshields hoping the driver would give him a few pesos to keep the note as a souvenir. I made a donation and kept three. I think they are quite attractive with representations on the front of Venezuelan historical figures Primer Negro, Luisa Caseres Arismendi and Francisco De Miranda, the latter quite interesting. On the back are a dolphin species,Hawksbill sea turtle and Giant Armadillow.

In August President Nicolas Maduro carried out yet another devaluation of the Venezuelan Bolivar considered one of the greatest monetary devaluations inhibitory. The official exchange rate went from 285,000 bolivars to the US dollar to 6 million.




Just as it is not easy to work out how to change the weather or make Mars habitable, it is mind-boggling to make a failing economy turn around and flourish.

Dictatorships have at least a chance of distributing resources: assigning forces labor and giving out food.

Is Venezuela testament to “the poverty of Socialism”, or just misfortune &/corruption?

Asher
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