Open Photography Forums  
HOME FORUMS NEWS FAQ SEARCH

Go Back   Open Photography Forums > OPF Welcome Hall > Entry Digital Photography

Entry Digital Photography Entry to a digital world can be eased. Try us!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old November 8th, 2013, 09:15 AM
Bob Rogers Bob Rogers is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 169
Default A tree dies

We had this tree in our back yard that had to come down. It was about 115 feet tall (35m).

I'll be making most of it into firewood; probably enough to keep us warm for two years.

In the first image, the man is probably 75 feet in the air. The stuff that looks like noise in the second image is sawdust.





Tree
Bob Rogers



Man
Bob Rogers
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old November 8th, 2013, 01:07 PM
Andrew Stannard Andrew Stannard is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lancashire, UK
Posts: 376
Default

Hi Bob,

How long did it take to take the whole tree down? Curious.

And also, what of the stump that is left - is this also dug up, or left to rot in the ground? Do roots make good firewood if you do dig it up?

35m sounds like a fairly hefty tree to me - I hope you have some photos of it to serve as a reminder!


Regards,
Andrew.
__________________
Webpage
Blog
Twitter
Facebook Page
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old November 8th, 2013, 02:59 PM
Bob Rogers Bob Rogers is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 169
Default

They arrived at 8 AM and were finished at 3 PM. Basically three guys did the work. The man in the tree plus two on the ground to control falling parts as necessary. They tie them to a long line and lower them. You can see two lines in the photo. The other line is a safety line that the man is about to attach to himself.

They are supposed to return and use a stump grinder to remove what is left. It's like a giant circular saw that turns the stump into wood chips.

We had an old stump at our last house that I did dig up in parts and burn. It's wood -- it burns ;-) Unfortunately we have another tree that probably needs to come down that's even bigger. It will be our third. They cost about $2,000 each to remove.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old November 8th, 2013, 08:40 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 33,102
Default

That's not the death of a tree, it's bloody murder! If it's $2,000 a tree, two things, first it must really be necessary and next, you do not have cheap labor from over the border as we do in California! I hate to see trees cut up like that! Sometimes, I guess it's necessary. I'd prefer they are kept healthy by pruning and not over watering.

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old November 9th, 2013, 04:17 AM
Andrew Stannard Andrew Stannard is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lancashire, UK
Posts: 376
Default

Hi Bob,

Thanks for the info - sounds like an interesting process to watch and photo.

I do find it a shame to see old and stately trees cut down, but can understand the circumstances where it is necessary.

ANdrew.
__________________
Webpage
Blog
Twitter
Facebook Page
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old November 11th, 2013, 08:24 AM
Bob Rogers Bob Rogers is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 169
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
That's not the death of a tree, it's bloody murder! If it's $2,000 a tree, two things, first it must really be necessary and next, you do not have cheap labor from over the border as we do in California! I hate to see trees cut up like that! Sometimes, I guess it's necessary. I'd prefer they are kept healthy by pruning and not over watering.

Asher
It was rotting in the middle. The trunk was about 24 inches across, but more than half was rotted. It would have fallen in the next big ice storm.

Big trees are expensive to take down when they are near houses. My boss had one taken down that was the same size for only $300 (by the same company), but then they just to dropped it in the yard and he cleaned it up. Actually I cleaned up most of it to get the wood to burn.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old November 17th, 2013, 12:25 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 33,102
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Rogers View Post
It was rotting in the middle. The trunk was about 24 inches across, but more than half was rotted. It would have fallen in the next big ice storm.

Big trees are expensive to take down when they are near houses. My boss had one taken down that was the same size for only $300 (by the same company), but then they just to dropped it in the yard and he cleaned it up. Actually I cleaned up most of it to get the wood to burn.
Bob,

I had a tree die from Dutch Elm Disease. I arranged for guys with a crane and bucket for the men to cut down the tree safely. I watched from the safety of 10 meters under the canopy of my favorite silver birch tree. Then I got a phone call in the house and carried my son inside, when the giant crane suddenly broke loose and crashed down, splitting the silver birch where I had stood and pushing a Ford Explorer SUV two feet deep into the tarmac driveway!

Asher
__________________
Follow us on Twitter at @opfweb

Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old November 21st, 2013, 09:44 AM
Doug Herr Doug Herr is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 122
Default

I had a cottonwood tree removed from my yard after a large limb dropped & damaged my truck. The tree's trunk was about 6' across and as we found later it was rotting on the inside.




I hated to lose the shade but the tree had been dropping limbs for several years and was too dangerous. For several years a pair of Western Screech Owls had nested in one of the tree's cavities so we made sure the nest was not active before we removed the tree.

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old November 21st, 2013, 11:17 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico, USA
Posts: 8,279
Default

Hi, Doug,

First, welcome to the forum!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug Herr View Post
I had a cottonwood tree removed from my yard after a large limb dropped & damaged my truck. The tree's trunk was about 6' across and as we found later it was rotting on the inside.

Cottonwoods have a very short service life. My former home in East Dallas originally had three in the front yard, but they all declined and had to be euthanized, one-by-one.

And of course we now live in a town named after cottonwoods (Alamogordo, N.M. - "fat cottonwood(s)"). The one you had certainly fit that moniker!

Best regards,

Doug
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old November 21st, 2013, 12:09 PM
Cem_Usakligil Cem_Usakligil is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 5,946
Default

Oh my! Doug Herr! How confusing can it get? What next, Doug Lerr?
PS: welcome Doug H.
__________________
Kind Regards, Cem

flickr
website
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old November 21st, 2013, 12:58 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Alamogordo, New Mexico, USA
Posts: 8,279
Default

Hi, Cem,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cem_Usakligil View Post
Oh my! Doug Herr! How confusing can it get? What next, Doug Lerr?
PS: welcome Doug H.
So, Francis Sillymuffin appears before a judge to petition for a change of name. He tells the judge that his name is just too embarrassing.

The judge says, "Well, I can understand that", and asks the fellow what new name he would like to adopt.

"Bob Sillymuffin", he replies.

Best regards,

Doug
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My World: A tree is a Tree is a.... Chris Calohan Landscape - Travel 4 August 5th, 2013 09:25 PM
Daylight Moon through Tree Robert Watcher Photography as Art 4 August 6th, 2012 11:22 AM
Critique Desired: Out today Mike Shimwell Landscape - Travel 14 October 8th, 2009 07:16 PM
The Wishing Tree Andrew Stannard Close-up & Macro 3 October 10th, 2007 10:55 AM
Reflections of a tree in water (Fort Merksem, Antwerp, Belgium) Cem_Usakligil Landscape - Travel 3 May 22nd, 2007 03:48 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:47 AM.


Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion 2006-2017 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!