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  #151  
Old January 24th, 2018, 04:06 PM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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No Asher. These are all outside lockers.

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  #152  
Old January 27th, 2018, 08:42 AM
Jarmo Juntunen Jarmo Juntunen is offline
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Viljakkala, a gloomy, dying Finnish village.



Village Restaurant. For Sale.


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  #153  
Old January 27th, 2018, 10:58 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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  #154  
Old January 27th, 2018, 11:37 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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Entrance of Château Haut-Bailly close to Pessac Léognan

Part of my series for the exhibition "Bateaux Chateaux Gâteaux"
Shot with a Pentax 645Z of course!
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  #155  
Old January 27th, 2018, 12:55 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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  #156  
Old January 27th, 2018, 01:15 PM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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The two doors in the courtyard of Georgia O'Keeffe's home in Abiquiu, New Mexico, that were the subject of several of her iconic paintings.



Douglas A. Kerr: Doors in the courtyard of Georgia O'Keeffe's home, 2017

Canon Powershot G16 ISO 400 f/4.0 1/2000 s

Best regards,

Doug
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  #157  
Old January 27th, 2018, 06:16 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
😂 💦


Jerome, I just laughed my head off! I suspect they don't want any more visitors, but it does seem a tad extreme!

Asher
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  #158  
Old January 27th, 2018, 06:18 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post

Entrance of Château Haut-Bailly close to Pessac Léognan

Part of my series for the exhibition "Bateaux Chateaux Gâteaux"
Shot with a Pentax 645Z of course!
Elegant and inviting! I know I would not starve there!

Just need an invitation!

Asher
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  #159  
Old January 28th, 2018, 12:53 AM
Wolfgang Plattner Wolfgang Plattner is offline
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Vienna, Cafe Alt Wien: One door, two windows ...


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  #160  
Old January 28th, 2018, 02:00 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang Plattner View Post
Vienna, Cafe Alt Wien: One door, two windows ...
I love this one !

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  #161  
Old January 28th, 2018, 05:41 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Elegant and inviting! I know I would not starve there!

Just need an invitation!

Asher
You wouldn't get thirsty either!
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  #162  
Old January 28th, 2018, 09:00 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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  #163  
Old February 4th, 2018, 11:56 AM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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A door that lost its initial importance.





Best regards
Michael
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  #164  
Old February 4th, 2018, 12:39 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
A door that lost its initial importance.





Michael,

You say it's lost its importance. Must be!

I tried in vain to use Yahoo and Google search what was its fame about, but got nothing at all!

So why was it significant? Was this some passport office, and who was that "Karl Sturm"?

If a picture "must speak for itself", then what censors its speech? But, likely as not, a picture, "Speaking for itself" means something different than "explaining".

Certainlyvthe doorway seems important and significant but what was its part in life at the time when it was most active?

Asher
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  #165  
Old February 4th, 2018, 01:51 PM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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  #166  
Old February 4th, 2018, 03:05 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Michael,

You say it's lost its importance. Must be!

I tried in vain to use Yahoo and Google search what was its fame about, but got nothing at all!

So why was it significant? Was this some passport office, and who was that "Karl Sturm"?

If a picture "must speak for itself", then what censors its speech? But, likely as not, a picture, "Speaking for itself" means something different than "explaining".

Certainlyvthe doorway seems important and significant but what was its part in life at the time when it was most active?

Asher
Asher,

A door with a well-ornamented doorframe that sports a broken doorsill and obvious signs of neglect has certainly no longer the importance in had before as an access to building or like here to a garden. Otherwise someone would have cared to repair and maintain the door better.
Why does it have to be something specifically significant for you? When did you lose the ability to look for the simple, obvious things first?

Does it need that much of an explanation for you?

Michael
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  #167  
Old February 4th, 2018, 09:46 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Asher,

A door with a well-ornamented doorframe that sports a broken doorsill and obvious signs of neglect has certainly no longer the importance in had before as an access to building or like here to a garden. Otherwise someone would have cared to repair and maintain the door better.
Why does it have to be something specifically significant for you? When did you lose the ability to look for the simple, obvious things first?

Does it need that much of an explanation for you?

Michael,

These are good points you make, yes, of course I could examine "what is". And yes, you are correct that we should be satisfied with what is given.










There! That is one fine facade. So what made the folk put in this effort?


I think that, likely as not, you happen to know enough of what justified such an investment in materials and effort. This is not trivial information but also culturally significant. This is, after all, something usual with it's own stories.

What it "is", in ordinary things, (when. it's merely the type of "paint on a canvas", concrete in a hydroelectric dam or wire in a transformer,) is not expected to be described. For these, we have prior konwledge.

Here, however, we have something unique that was once "alive, so to speak. It was a part of an especially designed and motivated structure. It, no doubt, played a role in the society at the time.

Imagine, approaching a war memorial, statue of Winston Churlil or the Gravestones in Gallipoli and only study on the lightin and patina of the granite? Doing so would ignore the humanity integral to these structures.

The camera can serve not merely to document the door, but also to serve as a lanturn to illuminiate our culture.

So yes, for this photograph invites interest just by itself. Thati s granted and much appreciated.

Still, in such circumstances, the experience it evokes can be increased exponentially by knowing of its planning and changing role during its active life.

After all, Michael, does one one describe a dead person? We do not focus on the texture of his skin, lifeless as it is, but we do relate to the place he served in his community. Why does the your interesting but dead door, deserve less?

I just happen to value any generosity and kindness in sharing the extra and so fundamental information.

Thanks,

Asher
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  #168  
Old February 4th, 2018, 10:15 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Michael,

These are good points you make, yes, of course I could examine "what is". And yes, you are correct that we should be satisfied with what is given.

{picture removed for readability}

There! That is one fine facade. So what made the folk put in this effort?


I think that, likely as not, you happen to know enough of what justified such an investment in materials and effort. This is not trivial information but also culturally significant. This is, after all, something usual with it's own stories.

What it "is", in ordinary things, (when. it's merely the type of "paint on a canvas", concrete in a hydroelectric dam or wire in a transformer,) is not expected to be described. For these, we have prior konwledge.

Here, however, we have something unique that was once "alive, so to speak. It was a part of an especially designed and motivated structure. It, no doubt, played a role in the society at the time.

Imagine, approaching a war memorial, statue of Winston Churlil or the Gravestones in Gallipoli and only study on the lightin and patina of the granite? Doing so would ignore the humanity integral to these structures.

The camera can serve not merely to document the door, but also to serve as a lanturn to illuminiate our culture.

So yes, for this photograph invites interest just by itself. Thati s granted and much appreciated.

Still, in such circumstances, the experience it evokes can be increased exponentially by knowing of its planning and changing role during its active life.

After all, Michael, does one one describe a dead person? We do not focus on the texture of his skin, lifeless as it is, but we do relate to the place he served in his community. Why does the your interesting but dead door, deserve less?

I just happen to value any generosity and kindness in sharing the extra and so fundamental information.

Thanks,

Asher

So basically four you a picture cannot serve as a metaphor, even less when signs writings are involved in the picture.

What would Winston Churchill have to to with a door somewhere in Bavaria?

My point is that explanations can be nice but do not necessarily increase the impact of the picture.

Best regards
Michael
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If you need many words to describe what your picture means, it doesn't speak enough for itself.
my photos on flickr - here is the portion posted in OPF.
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  #169  
Old February 4th, 2018, 10:24 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
So basically four you a picture cannot serve as a metaphor, even less when signs writings are involved in the picture.

What would Winston Churchill have to to with a door somewhere in Bavaria?

My point is that explanations can be nice but do not necessarily increase the impact of the picture.

Best regards
Michael
Michael,

Of course anything can serve as a metaphor, that's how all language is built. Even words like, "to" or "up" are metaphors. From my photography, comments, you must have recognized that looking for metaphors is one of my constants in an appreciative feedback.

I have not diminished in anyway, the impact of what "is" in the picture in my request for what "was" the doorways representing in its glory.

In this case, the door is not ordinary, it's not. mundane, but is part of some local history that must have some significance. You seem to be saying the sum of its worth is is just what we see and we should be satisfied. But you are correct that what you choose to exhibit is the artist's perogative and I have no inherent right to alter that!

Still, I beleive that what we do not see also is part of its value and complements what survives now.

If in spite of my interest your view is fixed, then that is what it is, like me being refused pastries in Munich during lunch time, as they do not serve pastries during lunchtime and that is what they do and dont do!

I appreciate that at least we see the interesting door. That I already like. I am sorry that the dislosure of more about it, apparently goes against some principal. I shouldn't be pushing the matter. My requests have, perhaps made it seem too important. Remember, I am appreciative of the photograph on its own! After all, if you want to put just one flower in a vase I cannot demand three of them instead.

If I could find it on a search engine, I wouldn't have been so persistent. I guess I am pushy at times.

Asher
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  #170  
Old February 4th, 2018, 10:31 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Michael,

Of course anything can serve as a metaphor, that's how all language is built. Even words like, "to" or "up" are metaphors. From my photography, comments, you must have recognized that looking for metaphors is one of my constants in an appreciative feedback.

I have not diminished in anyway, the impact of what "is" in the picture in my request for what "was" the doorways representing in its glory.

In this case, the door is not ordinary, it''s not. mundane but is part of some local history that is significanty. You seem to be saying the sum of its worth is is waht we see.

I beleive that what we do not see also is part of its value and complements what survives now.

If in spite of my interest your view is fixed, then that is what it is, like me being refused pastries in Munich during lunch time, as they do not serve pastries during lunchtime and that is what they do and dont do!

I appreciate that at least we see the interesting door. That I alreadylike. I am sorry that dislosing more goes against some rule or principal, so never mind.

asher

Asher
There is no rule. It is just that your question(s) you ask me quite often would spawn research work every time to satisfy your need for information when I did not see the necessity to search further. Do you have that little respect for the time of other people? Did you even consider the possibility?

Michael
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  #171  
Old February 4th, 2018, 10:41 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
There is no rule. It is just that your question(s) you ask me quite often would spawn research work every time to satisfy your need for information when I did not see the necessity to search further. Do you have that little respect for the time of other people? Did you even consider the possibility?

Michael

Michael,

You respond faster than I am typing! LOL.l I sometimes revise my post. So look again at my last response.

I do value your time. I was so interested in this picture of yours that I first spent a lot of time, actually close to an hour, trying to discover what it might mean. I see the engraved words used in part to describe restaurants.

I respect your time. I also appreciate and interesting image. When you have taken the time and effort to photograph this portal, I know it miust be significant. So as part of that resepect, I do not flip through your pictures in some flash of satidfactiopn to see anotehr nice post.

Rather I take this as part of your body of work and look to learn more of the world you are showing us.

Take this interest as a compliment. I do not spend that amount of time with 99% of images or I would be paralysed. Still, next time, if I cannot find the information I seek, I will not have you do that task for me.

The picture itself works. You body of work is my reference and gradually I will understand more, just from what you share.

One day, a visitor who is German will explain it to me. I am patient.

Asher
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  #172  
Old February 5th, 2018, 12:51 PM
Michael Nagel Michael Nagel is offline
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To satisfy your curiosity - it was the garden of this brewery, belonging to this monastery until 1879 when it changed into private hands (Karl Sturm) in this small town in Lower Bavaria. The brewery moved.

Town hall door in Freising:




Best regards
Michael
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  #173  
Old February 5th, 2018, 01:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
To satisfy your curiosity - it was the garden of this brewery, belonging to this monastery until 1879 when it changed into private hands (Karl Sturm) in this small town in Lower Bavaria. The brewery moved.

I love to hear about thse gems. It's like going to visit Ephesus in Western Turkey before the wonderful tour guide joined us from the tour bus. We could appreciate the magnificence of the empty streets and towering marble and granite skeltal remains of the buildings former glory, but until she told stories of what it was like, we had not the feelings for the place with its tapestry of real life and historical events that made the visit so memorable.

For us, where no homes have tihs workmanship, seeing the craftsman's work from old Europe, where our forebears originated, is something wonderful. You might take this sight as part of "normal". For us it's a special window to what doesnt exist here at all, history of our modern civilization, the places of Goethe, Mozart and then Bonaparte, Popes, Kings and knights and peasants paying for their winter seed with high interest loans from the rich!

It all worked in a patchwork of moving armies and shifting loyalties and alliances with nobility, artists, musicians, thinkers and writers all competing with power and ideas that made us what we are today.

That is why I personally am grateful for the extra information on the wondefrul buidlings you share.

I am puzzled how it is that the Google and Yahoo search engines in the USA fail to know about this last building, even though it has been there for ages!

If I search Kadashian or Paris Hilton I get no end of references, LOL!

Asher







Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Nagel View Post
Town hall door in Freising:






Michael,

Thanks again for an interesting and unique experience, the nearest thing to actually being there. It has heraldry, skilled carpentry, masonwork and formal design. This. is no casual door but itself also a stabilizing symbol that has to make the citizens more secure.

This door and doorway is so rich and it's workmanship shows how important this facility to the town. By have the investment in stone, as used in mansions, palaces and castles, this shows authority, status and power. All these are important for a community. It says both that you have to listen to our edicts but also that we have the pwer to act on your concerns.

Asher
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  #174  
Old February 16th, 2018, 03:44 PM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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No Asher, these shots are all from the outside...

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  #175  
Old February 16th, 2018, 03:52 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio Correia View Post
No Asher, these shots are all from the outside...

Antonio,

Suchca lot of good finds in a grand city that has undergone repeated transformations.

It's so surprising and frankly amazes me, the hidden secrets revealed behind the innocent walls! How usage changes!

Then look at the two pipe eyes and face to the left of the doorway - precious!

Asher
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  #176  
Old February 17th, 2018, 03:59 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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Setúbal is more and more renovated but still some old decaying buildings persist...

I could - if I wanted - to go inside this very building but I rather not. The roof is decaying and so is the wooden floor...

The two pipe eyes were from the water supply.

Thank you for answering, Asher


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