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UV/IR Thermal or Xray Photography Humans happen to use visible light naturally but now we can go beyond the usual wavelengths we appreciate, to find out more about our world and ourselves.

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  #1  
Old May 7th, 2018, 05:57 AM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Default Another new type Gazaina multispectral

Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):


(studio shot using a modified Xenon flash)
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  #2  
Old May 7th, 2018, 09:50 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Klaus Schmitt View Post
Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):


(studio shot using a modified Xenon flash)
Here, we win easily!

I would wish for a switch to UV if we could do it at will, but we are damned fortunate to have been given human vision!

Asher
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Old May 7th, 2018, 01:44 PM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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I would agree! If I could just ADD UV as another color to what I see, now that I would consider...
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  #4  
Old May 7th, 2018, 01:59 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Klaus Schmitt View Post
I woudl agree! If I could just ADD UV as another color to what I see, now that I would consider...
While we are going for that, why not add a zoom lens! Interesting that hunters don’t seem to have ever managed to evolve zoom optics!

Perhaps if they did, they would become so efficient that they could wipe out their food supply and so the “advantage” would be self limiting for that genetic line!

In this game, prey must escape sufficiently often to be able to over reproduce by some safety margin!

Asher
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  #5  
Old May 7th, 2018, 04:18 PM
Peter Dexter Peter Dexter is offline
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It is fascinating that so many creatures even including birds, dogs and cats can see in the UV range. Too bad that we can't. There is such an astounding variety of eyes amongst living species on our planet.
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  #6  
Old May 8th, 2018, 11:15 AM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Dexter View Post
It is fascinating that so many creatures even including birds, dogs and cats can see in the UV range. Too bad that we can't. There is such an astounding variety of eyes amongst living species on our planet.
Well Peter: Dog and cats CANNOT SEE UV!! Some birds, bees, butterflies, fish, and crustaceans do...
Agreed, a very astounding variety is there, namely a crab that sees 255 (!!!) colors especially.
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Old May 8th, 2018, 11:17 AM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
While we are going for that, why not add a zoom lens! Interesting that hunters don’t seem to have ever managed to evolve zoom optics!

Perhaps if they did, they would become so efficient that they could wipe out their food supply and so the “advantage” would be self limiting for that genetic line!

In this game, prey must escape sufficiently often to be able to over reproduce by some safety margin!

Asher
Some birds have some sort of zoom or better tele-lens built into their eyes, as the density of receptors in a very narrow spot on their fovea is so high, that they have increadibly high resolution there...
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  #8  
Old May 8th, 2018, 12:51 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Klaus Schmitt View Post
Some birds have some sort of zoom or better tele-lens built into their eyes, as the density of receptors in a very narrow spot on their fovea is so high, that they have increadibly high resolution there...
A wonderful advantage. I would like a full size MF sensor with that fovea pixel-dense central high resultion feature. One does not need peripheral information except for aporoaching threads and context.

But as hunting skills improve, the species risks destroying its food supply and extinction by over-success! So hunters MUST lose a majority of the time or else the game is over in a few cycles. I wonder what the safe level of Hunter success is. It has to be based on the relative reproductive rates and survival of hunter and hunted and the reliability of the food supply of the hunted!

Of course. A search reveals a lot of study results of hunter-prey mathematics!

Asher
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  #9  
Old May 8th, 2018, 01:12 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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It could be that some flower platforms are best as disguising the pollinators from their common predators!

Why didn’t I think of that before!!

Well so far I have found no scientific reports on the “safe haven” effect of flower platforms, so perhaps I have had an original thought here! Unlikely but possible!

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Old May 8th, 2018, 01:24 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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To add to the idea that the UV patterns might help pollinators get information on flowers usefull to them, there is some evidence that in addition to attractive colors and scents, the flower also signals electrically to at least some insects, such as the bumble bee. The hairs on the body will bristle as the charge difference between the negative-my charged flower and the positively charged beef is reflected in the bristle movement, as they arecrepelked from each other.

Flowers that have a bee on it or recently taken the nectar have a lower electrical charge and the incoming needs can sense that!

Asher
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  #11  
Old May 8th, 2018, 10:28 PM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
It could be that some flower platforms are best as disguising the pollinators from their common predators!

Why didn’t I think of that before!!

Well so far I have found no scientific reports on the “safe haven” effect of flower platforms, so perhaps I have had an original thought here! Unlikely but possible!

Asher
Far from that! Flowers are being used as hunting grounds by some clever insects for instance which (ab)use the flower's ability to attrract pollinators and feed on them - the famous crab spider for instance!! It is dark in UV light, so enhances even the attraction of the flower to pollinators! I have photographed that and have written about it here: Crab Spider on Tulip
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  #12  
Old May 8th, 2018, 11:17 PM
Roshni Patel Roshni Patel is offline
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Variations are really great!
Thumbs up to the work!
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Old May 8th, 2018, 11:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Klaus Schmitt View Post
Far from that! Flowers are being used as hunting grounds by some clever insects for instance which (ab)use the flower's ability to attrract pollinators and feed on them - the famous crab spider for instance!! It is dark in UV light, so enhances even the attraction of the flower to pollinators! I have photographed that and have written about it here: Crab Spider on Tulip
Fabulous! Did you watch the spider catch prey?

Asher
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  #14  
Old May 9th, 2018, 11:45 AM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Fabulous! Did you watch the spider catch prey?

Asher
On another location, yes!

Crab spider with prey on Tulip

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  #15  
Old May 9th, 2018, 12:04 PM
Dr Klaus Schmitt Dr Klaus Schmitt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roshni Patel View Post
Variations are really great!
Thumbs up to the work!
Thank you!
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