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  #1  
Old September 5th, 2006, 08:41 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default Rainer Travel Photography Article Now Online!

I would like to draw your attention to our new article on travel photography.

This follows the contribution written by Edmund Ronald from Paris posted several weeks ago.

My article on a unique style of street photography is published today. It features my own reactions to a small sampling of the personal travel photography of one of our Fine Architecture Photographers.

The article, "The Rainer Viertblöck Travel Photography", looks at his unusual and seemingly simple photographic style. I call this glimpse of his personal work, "Exposing for the soul!"
http://www.openphotographyforums.com...Kelman_001.php

If you read the article you may find that what at first glance may seem simple, is not. I hope you like my writing and enjoy the pictures as much as I do.

Then post your own comments here!

Thanks,

Asher
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  #2  
Old September 6th, 2006, 09:47 PM
Mark Schretlen Mark Schretlen is offline
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Thank you for posting this article, Asher.

Iím with you in that Iíve always found that B&W images force the viewerís attention to address the subject and challenges the photographer to de-clutter his image. What I find interesting about Rainerís vacation photographs is that it reminds me of a vague recollection of a place one has visited months ago - a deja-vu kind of feeling. So, perhaps Rainer is recording his future vague recollections of his vacation while he is on vacation. Iíve got to try this out myself sometime.
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  #3  
Old September 6th, 2006, 09:59 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Schretlen
Thank you for posting this article, Asher.

Iím with you in that Iíve always found that B&W images force the viewerís attention to address the subject and challenges the photographer to de-clutter his image. What I find interesting about Rainerís vacation photographs is that it reminds me of a vague recollection of a place one has visited months ago - a deja-vu kind of feeling. So, perhaps Rainer is recording his future vague recollections of his vacation while he is on vacation. Iíve got to try this out myself sometime.
Thanks for your impressions. Yes, it is so different in B&W. Why is it that color, which is what we see, can be so distracting in a picture?

Rainerís vacation photographs is that it reminds me of a vague recollection of a place one has visited months ago - a deja-vu kind of feeling. So, perhaps Rainer is recording his future vague recollections of his vacation while he is on vacation.


That is interesting.

Asher
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Old September 6th, 2006, 10:46 PM
Mark Schretlen Mark Schretlen is offline
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Default Yes, color is distracting

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman
Why is it that color, which is what we see, can be so distracting in a picture?
Color itself can set a mood, evoke an emotion, or even be the subject. I guess itís not too surprising that it can steal the show. A useful trick in composition is to turn an image upside down in order force yourself to look at form and space. An even better trick is to convert your image to monochrome to see if it remains compositionally sound. Yes, color is distracting.
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Old September 7th, 2006, 09:27 AM
David Robertson David Robertson is offline
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[QUOTE=Mark Schretlen]. . . A useful trick in composition is to turn an image upside down in order force yourself to look at form and space. . .QUOTE]

Yes, I found the same with the back-to-front image in the waist-level finder of my Mamiya RB system. It really breaks a scene down into its component parts and it is something that I really miss with DSLRs.

Cheers

Dave
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  #6  
Old September 7th, 2006, 09:58 AM
Roger Lambert Roger Lambert is offline
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I know my reply here may make me unpopular, but I'm afraid I do not quite see the high art in the photographs provided in the article.

My files are full of well-composed, but blurry photographs that certainly have a surreal appeal. I enjoy many of them. They have not been deliberately produced, but are usually the product of technical insufficiencies on my part. I saw them a lot more with my old P&S, which was restricted to only having 100 ISO capability.

The scene of the canals at night by boat is an example of the type of photograph I would have produced in unavoidable fashion with my Fuji 2800 under those conditions of low light and a rocking boat.

While I may have had a pet sentamentality for such a picture, I don't think I could get away with proposing it as high art, as I was/am an amateur.

Just because a photographer has a well-deserved pedigree for architechtural work, should not, IMO, render his basically pedestrian works as high-art. I know this sounds dismissive on my part, but I truly can not appreciate any difference between these presented photographs and those produced by (my) poor technique.

This is not to say the presented photographs do not have their charms - I like them! The alleyway shot, especially, to my eyes has en expressionistic quality that is pleasing. I think I might like it even more in color.

What really struck me about the nature of the provided photographs is that they seemed eerily familiar, and not just because they reminded me of many of my own photographs.

I have pretty poor eyesight. Unless I have a brand-new prescription, I don't normally see the world with as much accuracy as most folks.

What the provided photographs reminded me of - when I realized the association - was exactly how I see the world when I have had one too many drinks. My focus is even worse than usual, my glasses are likely to be bouncing around on the bridge of my nose, and my brain is one step behind in its pathetic efforts to process all the (mis) information.

So, I must be honest. What I see is drunken photography. The deliberate interpretation of the world through the eyes of inebriation.

In this sense, for me, the images are powerful and evocative. And fill me with a small fealing of dread. :D

But they do not necessarily present me with a vision of the world that I find technically interesting, or particularly beautiful.
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  #7  
Old September 7th, 2006, 04:02 AM
Mary Bull Mary Bull is offline
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[QUOTE=Asher Kelman]
Quote:
My article on a unique style of street photography is published today. It features my own reactions to a small sampling of the personal travel photography of one of our Fine Architecture Photographers.
Asher, I enjoyed reading the article very much. The writing was clear, it pulled me in and held my attention, and the organization made your ideas easy for me to grasp.
Quote:
The article, "The Rainer ViertblŲck Travel Photography", looks at his unusual and seemingly simple photographic style. I call this glimpse of his personal work, "Exposing for the soul!"
http://www.openphotographyforums.com...Kelman_001.php
The images are indeed fine art.
Quote:
If you read the article you may find that what at first glance may seem simple, is not. I hope you like my writing and enjoy the pictures as much as I do.
I liked your writing, and I enjoyed the pictures, Asher. I have a few comments regarding my reaction to the pictures.

1) As to b&w, I like b&w, but I also value well-done color images just as much.

2) As to composition (use of space and line) the examples you provide are masterworks, of course. I like the first one especially, and I think I like it better than the other examples precisely because the relatively sharp vertical lines of the buildings provide some contrast to the more-blurred water.

3) I know that a photograph's *appeal* to me has no connection with the inherent value of the image: whether viewed from the angle of commercial viability or from the standpoint of its excellence as a still image.

4) My taste in pictures has been changing over the past four years and will probably change even more, as I learn to appreciate more different styles, through the many fine images being offered at OPF.

5) At present, I value clarity almost above everything else--clarity, good composition, and that indefinable something which lures me in to inhabit the scene.

6) But, I'm learning. The discussion in the "Vernacular Architecture" thread is beginning to expand my taste a bit--that is, to change what appeals to me on first sight.

7) I guess I'm always going to be a first-sight, like-it-or-not-immediately person. But my taste may broaden.

One last comment: Rainier's pictures of Venice did not pull me into the scene. Perhaps that's because I did not come to them naively but saw them after first reading this entire thread--I was one step back, with my "instant appeal" mechanism disabled for the moment.

I'll look some more and try to gain an appreciation for the mysterious sense of darkness, the story, which may be waiting for me in the scenes.

Mary
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  #8  
Old September 7th, 2006, 09:22 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Mary,

Photography does not always have to be about what we see. Of course it's all about the light. We try to paint with it, but there's darkness to use as well.

This is much more obvious here, in Rainer's pictures, where it is already dark and a slow shutter speed is intentionally used.

With B&W, we're conditioned by the great masters to expect much more technically challenging graduations of tone with subjects of stunning beauty and interest.

Here, however, the apparently ordinary is photographed. One has to add one's own detail and that requires exploration.

Asher
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  #9  
Old September 7th, 2006, 11:23 AM
Mary Bull Mary Bull is offline
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And imagination, I should imagine. <friendly smile>
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Posting images or text grants license to OPF, yet © of such remain with its creator. Still, all assembled discussion © 2006-2017 Asher Kelman (all rights reserved) Posts with new theme or unusual image might be moved/copied to a new thread!