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  #121  
Old March 16th, 2011, 03:54 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Originally Posted by Jim Galli View Post
Tough to argue with brute force.


soft prickly

6.5X8.5" full plate with antique Darlot Achromatic Meniscus lens.

"Ain't nothing like the real thing!"

Asher
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  #122  
Old March 19th, 2011, 04:58 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
"Ain't nothing like the real thing!"

Asher
Jim,

I have seen this before, and seeing it again is fresh water.

cheers
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  #123  
Old June 5th, 2011, 11:09 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Is this thread still alive? Who's out shooting B&W film? A couple of recent prints of mine:

Hopelessness of the trash scourer

(Kodak TMY2-400, Olympus OM-3Ti, Zuiko 135/3.5 @ 3.5)

Inner smile in the rain

(Kodak TMY2-400, Olympus OM-3Ti, Zuiko 50/1.4 @ 2.0)

Fern Valley Detail #2

(Kodak TMY2-400, Olympus OM-3Ti, Zuiko 21/2.0 @ 2.0)

Distorted Self-portrait

(Ilford HP5+, Mamiya RB67, Sekor 127/3.8 @ 3.8)

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  #124  
Old June 5th, 2011, 11:46 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawid Loubser View Post
Is this thread still alive? Who's out shooting B&W film?
Dawid,

I'm shooting digital still but ramping up on B&W and color film too. Will post more! Look in the 5 threads from Nevada visiting ghost mining towns!

but to your pictures, one at a time!




Dawid Loubser: Hopelessness of the trash scourer

(Kodak TMY2-400, Olympus OM-3Ti, Zuiko 135/3.5 @ 3.5)

The plight of another person is an important topic for lighting our attention to what we pass by everyday without much thought. Here, the man in his thoughts is imaged well. You have not allowed his identity to be revealed. Was that intentional? I have a question about use of such a limited focal plane. I seems to be that the cobblestones/pavement markings sweeping towards him would bring in the metaphor of man's journeys, where this man has somehow been left aside.

I'd love to see more if you have the possibility and interest in returning.

However, you might have an idea for which this narrow focal plane is essential or perhaps the light was too low for the film. But this film can be pushed to 1600 ISO and still look superb!

Asher
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  #125  
Old June 5th, 2011, 11:54 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Dawid Loubser: Streaking Skyward

(Olympus OM-1, 90mm Macro at f/4.0, Fomapan 100 at ISO64, 8x10in analogue print)



Dawid,

The juxtaposition of such a massive plane on the ground with a nimble fast jet sweeping the sky high above is dramatic. This would make a wonderful large print. It has a lot of clean power. BTW, I really would consider a large white matt when you print this as the black, IMHO closes the image and we need to experience openness.

Asher
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  #126  
Old June 5th, 2011, 02:12 PM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Here, the man in his thoughts is imaged well. You have not allowed his identity to be revealed. Was that intentional? I have a question about use of such a limited focal plane. I seems to be that the cobblestones/pavement markings sweeping towards him would bring in the metaphor of man's journeys, where this man has somehow been left aside.

I'd love to see more if you have the possibility and interest in returning.
Hi Asher,

I literally only had about three seconds to compose this photograph, as I was busy driving at the time, and had only stopped at the stop sign next to which this man was sitting. I often perform the rather dangerous/irresponsible act of drive-by-photography while driving :-)

Shallow depth of field is an underlying aspect of my style, so I would have had my exposure set for that (remember, it's a mechanical camera). Even if I wanted to, however, I did not have the time to meter or adjust exposure. I am happy with the end result, however, and am continually pleased by the spectacular ability of this $60 lens.

The metaphor of the pavement and the road, depicting the man's "journey", however, was not intended in this photograph, though I can see how it could appear that way. The man is the subject, pure and simple, with no deeper message, and no commentary. I am also pleased that he remains anonymous... Otherwise it would have been a very different - more emotionally charged - image, which is a rather contentious subject that I usually try to avoid.
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  #127  
Old June 5th, 2011, 02:43 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawid Loubser View Post
The metaphor of the pavement and the road, depicting the man's "journey", however, was not intended in this photograph, though I can see how it could appear that way.
Dawid,

I expected that you like the open lens results. I do too. I was just offering an idea for what might also be considered. I'm always moved by such sights. Pity for the poverty and loss of hope and embarrassment at my final indifference for walking on. In the end, unless one is going to adopt the person, one has to just leave them to their fate.

Asher
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  #128  
Old June 6th, 2011, 12:12 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Dawid,

I expected that you like the open lens results. I do too. I was just offering an idea for what might also be considered. I'm always moved by such sights. Pity for the poverty and loss of hope and embarrassment at my final indifference for walking on. In the end, unless one is going to adopt the person, one has to just leave them to their fate.

Asher
I feel the same as you, Asher - and in South Africa, our society is so extremely polarised, and the gap between poverty and ludicrous wealth is so large, that one cannot do anything but be numbed by it all. And, of course, exercise our political power by voting for a party that will not continue to run the country into the ground as the ANC has up to now. Only though mass political will - I believe - can some balance be re-introduced. But that's a non-photographic topic of conversation :-)
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  #129  
Old June 6th, 2011, 11:40 AM
Clayton Lofgren Clayton Lofgren is offline
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I like that Skyward shot. Part of it may be my old love affair with the OM-1. Both of mine were stolen, but not forgotten.
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  #130  
Old August 9th, 2011, 01:44 PM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Hello dear B&W enthusiasts - some recent large-format work:


(Ilford HP5+ 4x5in, Nikkor T*ED 500mm f/11, Linhof Technika V)


(Ilford HP5+ 4x5in, Nikkor T*ED 360mm f/8, Linhof Technika)

And (posted elsewhere, but keeping this thread alive) some medium-format work:


(Ilford FP4+ 6x7cm, Mamiya RB67, Sekor-C 50mm f/4.5)


(Ilford FP4+ 6x7cm, Mamiya RB67, Sekor-C 140mm f/4.5 Macro)


All processed myself in Diluted D-76 developer (having major issues with uneven 4x5 development, have since switched to tray-processing). Up to moderate print sizes, my hand-held RB67 shots appear just as good (technically) as the painstaking large-format work. The LF process is fun though! And the LF lenses are *much* smaller/lighter than the RB67 lenses.
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  #131  
Old August 9th, 2011, 02:09 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Just quick notes about my thoughts when seeing your 4 pictures:


(Ilford HP5+ 4x5in, Nikkor T*ED 500mm f/11, Linhof Technika V)

Simple but effective composition.


(Ilford HP5+ 4x5in, Nikkor T*ED 360mm f/8, Linhof Technika)

Here I would definitely like to see more of the plants at the bottom. I need something to close the frame at the bottom


(Ilford FP4+ 6x7cm, Mamiya RB67, Sekor-C 50mm f/4.5)

That is simply very nice. The shape of the trees is just perfect for the composition.


(Ilford FP4+ 6x7cm, Mamiya RB67, Sekor-C 140mm f/4.5 Macro)

I like this one less. Sure, the shape of the rock points at the man, but the two persons behind the rock distract me and the horizon is tilted (that last point can be easily corrected, though).

Quote:
And the LF lenses are *much* smaller/lighter than the RB67 lenses.
The RB67 lenses are really huge indeed.
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  #132  
Old August 9th, 2011, 11:08 PM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Thanks for your feedback, Jerome! On the second image, I was limited by lens, position, and quickly-failing afternoon light. I made the best of the possibilities at that time, but I agree, I would have liked a 300mm lens (instead of a 360) standing on that ridge.
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  #133  
Old August 12th, 2011, 03:53 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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(Ilford FP4+ 6x7cm, Mamiya RB67, Sekor-C 50mm f/4.5)


Well, this is a dynamic shot. Was there a hill or is this a sloped shot? The RB67 is no lightweight for handheld! You need a lightweight folding camera, LOL! Have you seen this one here?

Asher
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  #134  
Old August 12th, 2011, 07:47 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Well, this is a dynamic shot. Was there a hill or is this a sloped shot? The RB67 is no lightweight for handheld! You need a lightweight folding camera, LOL! Have you seen this one here?

Asher
Hi Asher - I love hand-holding my RB67 + waist-level viewfinder, slung around my neck with it's big, comfortable leather strap. It's a very stable and comfortable setup, in my opinion. I've used it successfully down to about 1/8s exposure time with quite good results.

For the image, I was indeed on a sloping dune next to the sea, but I also tilted the camera to end up with this composition (at a whim). I must agree with the appeal of a folding MF cameras (the new Voigtländers look great) but I am a Mamiya man, I'd rather do a Mamiya 7II. The only reason I have not sold some of my other gear to fund a MF rangefinder, is that I really think I will be limited in style by the inaccurate framing, and 1 meter close-focus limit. When I shoot MF, I am immediately in a "waist-level viewfinder, amazing close-focus-ability" mindset (as made possible by the RB67).
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  #135  
Old August 12th, 2011, 10:54 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawid Loubser View Post
The only reason I have not sold some of my other gear to fund a MF rangefinder, is that I really think I will be limited in style by the inaccurate framing, and 1 meter close-focus limit. When I shoot MF, I am immediately in a "waist-level viewfinder, amazing close-focus-ability" mindset (as made possible by the RB67).
The new camera is overpriced at $2999 but s sad to be as sharp as the Mamiya and the viewfinder s the most advanced ever made and adjust for parallax and has an electronic overlay too.

Asher
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  #136  
Old August 12th, 2011, 02:19 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Have you seen this one here?
Your link ends up on a page requesting a password for me. What is there to be seen?
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  #137  
Old August 13th, 2011, 10:13 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
Your link ends up on a page requesting a password for me. What is there to be seen?
Voigtländer Bessa III 667 W (wide angle) : Pics here

One of the nicer new film cameras around :)
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  #138  
Old August 13th, 2011, 02:55 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Originally Posted by Dawid Loubser View Post
Voigtländer Bessa III 667 W (wide angle) : Pics here

One of the nicer new film cameras around :)
It is nice, but one can get a used Mamiya RB67 and 50mm lens for a fifth of the price nowadays. Sure, it is probably 5 times the weight, but that is a lot of money.
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  #139  
Old August 14th, 2011, 02:12 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
It is nice, but one can get a used Mamiya RB67 and 50mm lens for a fifth of the price nowadays. Sure, it is probably 5 times the weight, but that is a lot of money.
Indeed, Jerome, that is why I am shooting an RB67, and am a very vocal proponent of the RB system. However, for traveling light, as well as probably superior non-retrofocus wide-angle lens performance, a lot of people will be prepared to pay a premium.

An RB67 is a solid brick of a workhorse camera though, and will for sure outlast the more fragile Mamiya 7 rangefinder or Voigtländer Bessa III rangefinder bodies, which are clad in plastic, and rely on electronics.

A member here on OPF, documenting the Inuit in Alaska in the 1980s, told of how he once dropped his RB7 in the ice water, and later on ended up completely being encased in ice. When he next needed to use it, he simply chipped off the ice and continued to work :-) You can't kill an RB67. Mine was my first film camera, and will probably be my last, despite acquiring much "fancier" film cameras along the way...
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  #140  
Old August 14th, 2011, 03:53 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Maybe you can't kill a RB67, but you can turn all the little foamy light seals to gunk after time... I know, I have fixed 4 magazines all by myself.
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  #141  
Old August 14th, 2011, 11:33 AM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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Hello Dawid, I don't shoot except 35mm. I have not even seen in person a LF camera!!

But I can surely appreciate the results you derive from your system. The last 4 images being a case in point.

#1, simple, effective, makes one to look at it again..lovely.
#3, another effective image with the dynamics being supplied by the stunted ( ? ) trees.

#4. I like it. I have grappled with tilted horizons. Are they effective? Always or sometimes? Where, when?
I think a tilted horizon brings dynamics to a static image. But, for me, the question remains when is a tilted horizon most effective and when not?

I do not know the answer but I think it is quite effective in your fourth image.

Regards.
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  #142  
Old August 15th, 2011, 02:24 AM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fahim mohammed View Post
Hello Dawid, I don't shoot except 35mm. I have not even seen in person a LF camera!!
Hi Fahim,

I shoot 35mm, MF and LF film as and when appropriate (and often when not appropriate!). Each format certainly has its merits. If a medium-format RB67 wasn't so darn bulky, though, i'd chuck the others and just shoot it :-) The LF camera is, on the other hand, a total submission to ridiculous size/weight, and being tripod-bound - may as well go all the way, for the images it makes possible.

In the darkroom, I often still chuckle to myself when I see the huge negatives - it's another world.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fahim mohammed View Post
#4. I like it. I have grappled with tilted horizons. Are they effective? Always or sometimes? Where, when?
I think a tilted horizon brings dynamics to a static image. But, for me, the question remains when is a tilted horizon most effective and when not?

I do not know the answer but I think it is quite effective in your fourth image.
I very rarely tilt horizons, and when I do so, I like to think it's always purposeful. My only other example I have is from 2007 (sorry, in colour, hijacking a B&W thread!):

Divisions of faith

(APS-H digital, Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L)

(This was an experiment to try and create harmony when doing everything "wrong": out-of-focus foreground (f/2.8, 200mm), tilted horizon, shot straight into the sun, etc.)

http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs22/f/20...atographer.jpg
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  #143  
Old August 16th, 2011, 12:19 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawid Loubser View Post
Hi Fahim,

I shoot 35mm, MF and LF film as and when appropriate (and often when not appropriate!). Each format certainly has its merits. If a medium-format RB67 wasn't so darn bulky, though, i'd chuck the others and just shoot it :-) The LF camera is, on the other hand, a total submission to ridiculous size/weight, and being tripod-bound - may as well go all the way, for the images it makes possible.

In the darkroom, I often still chuckle to myself when I see the huge negatives - it's another world.



I very rarely tilt horizons, and when I do so, I like to think it's always purposeful. My only other example I have is from 2007 (sorry, in colour, hijacking a B&W thread!):

Divisions of faith

(APS-H digital, Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L)

(This was an experiment to try and create harmony when doing everything "wrong": out-of-focus foreground (f/2.8, 200mm), tilted horizon, shot straight into the sun, etc.)

http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs22/f/20...atographer.jpg


I'm fine with this, Dawid! This shows rules can be broken but how do we deal with the result. Yes, it's interesting and more so than a pretty sunset. We'd need more of this ilk to see how it works out. As a one off, one has a harder time of placing it in some evaluative scale, but if were a true scholar and genius, I could do better.

Asher
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  #144  
Old August 16th, 2011, 06:14 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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"Breaking the rules" is now a new thread here!
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  #145  
Old August 29th, 2011, 06:28 PM
Mike Shimwell Mike Shimwell is offline
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Default back on the (mono) track:)

An oldie...

Mike

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  #146  
Old August 31st, 2011, 06:00 PM
Mike Shimwell Mike Shimwell is offline
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Tree series - 1
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  #147  
Old September 1st, 2011, 05:35 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Shimwell View Post
An oldie...

Mike


Mike,

This has a great mood and esthetic finesse: the mist contrasts with the fine wires.

What amazes me is that, once the brain figures out that we're in a railway carriage, we seem to be moving fast, even though there's no blur to nearby objects outside!

Asher
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  #148  
Old September 1st, 2011, 04:33 PM
Mark Hampton Mark Hampton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Shimwell View Post
An oldie...

Mike

Mike,
its got the same light feel as the Scottish beach image - it give me feeling of looking out of a window - with the world moving past - isolated from the wind ... real imaganed lived space ..

the focus allows me to make or not details ....

cheers
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  #149  
Old December 22nd, 2011, 01:19 PM
Dawid Loubser Dawid Loubser is offline
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What, is this thread dying down? :-) Here are a couple of recent prints of mine:

Snowbells A

(Ilford HP5 4x5in, Schneider APO-Symmar 150mm at f/5.6, Linhof Technika)

Water through the shroud

(Kodak TMY-2 400 35mm, Nikkor-H.C 50mm at f/2.0, Nikon F)

Screen printing workshop

(Kodak TMY-2 400 35mm, OM Zuiko 21mm at f/4.0, Olympus OM-3Ti)

The B&W flame is burning bright over here - It's been almost 2 years since I produced any colour photographs whatsoever!
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  #150  
Old February 1st, 2012, 05:12 PM
Mike Shimwell Mike Shimwell is offline
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Dawid

Three splendid pictures. I particularly like the screen printing workshop - great light and clarity.

Here are a couple from the last few months (sell summer really!) to maintain some momentum in the thread:)

Mike


Trying on a medieval armour helmet




Untitled



Evening flight
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