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Asher Kelman's Public and Private Art Yes I photograph for many reasons. Much of my work has been with public charities to pay back for the opportunities given to me all my life. This year I'm going public with Photography shows and sculptures submitted for folk to enjoy in city gardens and parks. So let me share with you what I do!

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  #1  
Old April 14th, 2015, 08:18 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Default Public Art submissions: Sculpture for Traffic Islands in a new city development

This journey started with rescuing from the scrap in in the steel fabricating plant doing work for me. I thought that the 1/8" steel rods used to weave a material in a decorative fence, could be repurposed as central lines for making curves in a sculpture. So I ignored the waves and just worked with an imaginary smooth central curved axis.

I fixed one end in a plank of wood by epoxy-gluing it into a drilled hole I made. Then with pliers and the radius of various cans, jars, buckets and the like, I curved the steel to follow a sketch I had made using 3 strands, each 5t long. At the end of the process, when things were balanced, I epoxied the free ends of the 3 steel rods into the plank and I had a maquette, with the working name, "Partners"

For the first sculpture, I enlarged the work 2:1 measuring by hand the dimensions and using the strength and endurance of several skilled iron workers to reproduce my maquette in solid 1" steel. I was scared of using steel tubing, for fear that sharp bends might cause the walls to collapse. See the process, here. Now I studied the forms and what resonated with me was the interaction of the two forms facing one another. They were in conversation, so that, necessitated my change of name and that new name belongs!




Asher Kelman: "The Conversation"

58" long x18" wide X 27" high 1/10

1" Steel rod 2014 and Acrylic Red


Then I decided to enlarge the work 6 to 8 times using 6" or 8" steel tubing and tons of steel. That required reverse engineering. So I purchased a Structure Scanner attachment for an iPad Air II and then scanned the sculpture sending it wirelessly to a software program, Skannect in my Macbook Pro.
Then I sent the form I generated as a .STS file to a company that could extract the central line of the complex curves and generate the exact curves from which to rebuild the exactly 1" steel tubing as so generating a machine file to be scaled up for job estimating by a large industrial fabricator to work in 6" or 8" steel.




Asher Kelman: "The Conversation"

58" long x18" wide X 27" high 1/10

Reverse Engineered Computer Rendering of Scanned and processed file

Scanning with Structure Sensor Scanner on an ipad Air II


So now the work is out to bid and the project will be submitted to a competition.......with the following renderings in massive versions.....














If made 8x current size, it will span 40ft and be 12 ft wide and 21ft high, using some 240 ft of stainless steel pipe! Has to withstand heat and cold and rain as well as really strong winds!! This is fun!

Asher
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  #2  
Old April 15th, 2015, 12:29 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Now the next thing is to light it from the inside!

Asher
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  #3  
Old April 15th, 2015, 07:50 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is online now
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
This journey started with rescuing from the scrap in in the steel fabricating plant doing work for me. I thought that the 1/8" steel rods used to weave a material in a decorative fence, could be repurposed as central lines for making curves in a sculpture. So I ignored the waves and just worked with an imaginary smooth central curved axis.

I fixed one end in a plank of wood by epoxy-gluing it into a drilled hole I made. Then with pliers and the radius of various cans, jars, buckets and the like, I curved the steel to follow a sketch I had made using 3 strands, each 5t long. At the end of the process, when things were balanced, I epoxied the free ends of the 3 steel rods into the plank and I had a maquette, with the working name, "Partners"

For the first sculpture, I enlarged the work 2:1 measuring by hand the dimensions and using the strength and endurance of several skilled iron workers to reproduce my maquette in solid 1" steel. I was scared of using steel tubing, for fear that sharp bends might cause the walls to collapse. See the process, here. Now I studied the forms and what resonated with me was the interaction of the two forms facing one another. They were in conversation, so that, necessitated my change of name and that new name belongs!




Asher Kelman: "The Conversation"

58" long x18" wide X 27" high 1/10

1" Steel rod 2014 and Acrylic Red


Then I decided to enlarge the work 6 to 8 times using 6" or 8" steel tubing and tons of steel. That required reverse engineering. So I purchased a Structure Scanner attachment for an iPad Air II and then scanned the sculpture sending it wirelessly to a software program, Skannect in my Macbook Pro.
Then I sent the form I generated as a .STS file to a company that could extract the central line of the complex curves and generate the exact curves from which to rebuild the exactly 1" steel tubing as so generating a machine file to be scaled up for job estimating by a large industrial fabricator to work in 6" or 8" steel.




Asher Kelman: "The Conversation"

58" long x18" wide X 27" high 1/10

Reverse Engineered Computer Rendering of Scanned and processed file

Scanning with Structure Sensor Scanner on an ipad Air II


So now the work is out to bid and the project will be submitted to a competition.......with the following renderings in massive versions.....
<snip>
Quote:






If made 8x current size, it will span 40ft and be 12 ft wide and 21ft high, using some 240 ft of stainless steel pipe! Has to withstand heat and cold and rain as well as really strong winds!! This is fun!
It is wondrous how you have become able to use today's marvelous tools in pursuit of the realization of this work.

In the last image (above), the (in this view) black "socks" somehow create for me a vision of a large creature, perhaps an insect, but really most evocative of a a spider (albeit with only six legs).

A wondrous work, and a wondrous process. Thanks for sharing both with us.

Best regards,

Doug
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  #4  
Old April 15th, 2015, 09:06 AM
Antonio Correia Antonio Correia is offline
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It is indeed a great work.
I like it and I am almost sure that you will get a good position.
The sculpture is very modern and appellative standing very well on the green grass even if this one may be artificial as the water restrictions in CA are serious.

Does your proposal work includes the grass ?
I think it does include the light system as it assumes a great importance.

Do you have any safety concerns regarding the traffic ? I mean, the light can temporarily blind the drivers if too direct or falling on the driver's eyes...
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Old April 15th, 2015, 10:29 AM
Maggie Terlecki Maggie Terlecki is offline
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Very cool. I'm amazed by the advances in technology that allowed you to scan this and upload it to your computer to allow you to reproduce it at a much larger size.

More amazed at the vision and confidence on your part to see it as a huge public piece. I could use a dose of that. :-)

All the best with this project,
Maggie
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Old April 16th, 2015, 12:09 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio Correia View Post
It is indeed a great work.
I like it and I am almost sure that you will get a good position.
The sculpture is very modern and appellative standing very well on the green grass even if this one may be artificial as the water restrictions in CA are serious.

There's a local grass used in Kansas that can withstand dry periods. I'm happy even with yellow dry grass!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio Correia
Does your proposal work includes the grass ?
I think it does include the light system as it assumes a great importance.
Lanscaping is part of the development, not the sculpture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio Correia
Do you have any safety concerns regarding the traffic ? I mean, the light can temporarily blind the drivers if too direct or falling on the driver's eyes...
The lights are designed and directed to only light the sculpture and will not be seen by the traffic. That is an important feature of the layout and is a standard consideration in any public works project!

Asher
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  #7  
Old April 16th, 2015, 01:04 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Now there's a second traffic island, 76 ft in diameter. For this I designed a model at 1/6 scale with 20ft of steel in a continuous closed loop of complex curves. The full scale sculpture would have 120 ft of steel curled in the same form, but, larger and supported on 3 concrete pads.








Asher Kelman: "The Journey"

CAD reverse engineered from scan of 1/8" steel rod model


No matter where one is there are other folk one would be passing at a different stage in their own lives. So the idea is to think in terms of the cycle of life and be supportive of everyone along the way.

I did not render this with grass and passing cars, since we already have that idea from it's larger sibling.


Asher
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  #8  
Old April 16th, 2015, 01:19 AM
Nicolas Claris Nicolas Claris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post






Asher Kelman: "The Journey"

CAD reverse engineered from scan of 1/8" steel rod model

Asher
I like this!
I don't need any explanation to make my own journey looking at it.
Should be fun and joy to turn around with perspective and light playing on curves.

Simply great!
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Old April 16th, 2015, 01:29 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicolas Claris View Post
I like this!
I don't need any explanation to make my own journey looking at it.
Should be fun and joy to turn around with perspective and light playing on curves.

Simply great!

Thanks for the visit. I like this too!

How it works as a sculpture: The curves work in a special way that's totally different from appreciating a photograph or a sculpture of a war hero or great leader. With solid works of art, the composition is inherent in the object itself.

With this open tubular steel, however, the landscape, trees and sky all get broken to sections as parts occupy a temporary and constantly changing "window" through the parts that are currently forming a frame for what is behind it. Also, objects at further distances away move at correspondingly greater speed. So everything in the scene now contributes to the dimensional "reach" of the sculpture, far beyond it's physical size. In fact, the further away, the more the sculpture will appear to effect the surrounding structures!

The unique feature of this form or work is that it is very sensitive to the observer's position and so it gets to have a changing personality as we rotate around it. The challenge now is to wait to be selected. One's work has to be chosen by folk! Hopefully, these two offerings, "The Conversation" and "The journey" will meet and surpass the planners' dreams and expectations. Building and assembly is just organization, work and great attention to detail and safety!

Asher
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Our purpose is getting to an impressive photograph. So we encourage browsing and then feedback. Consider a link to your galleries annotated, C&C welcomed. Images posted within OPF are assumed to be for Comment & Critique, unless otherwise designated.
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  #10  
Old April 17th, 2015, 10:06 AM
James Lemon James Lemon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
Thanks for the visit. I like this too!

How it works as a sculpture: The curves work in a special way that's totally different from appreciating a photograph or a sculpture of a war hero or great leader. With solid works of art, the composition is inherent in the object itself.

With this open tubular steel, however, the landscape, trees and sky all get broken to sections as parts occupy a temporary and constantly changing "window" through the parts that are currently forming a frame for what is behind it. Also, objects at further distances away move at correspondingly greater speed. So everything in the scene now contributes to the dimensional "reach" of the sculpture, far beyond it's physical size. In fact, the further away, the more the sculpture will appear to effect the surrounding structures!

The unique feature of this form or work is that it is very sensitive to the observer's position and so it gets to have a changing personality as we rotate around it. The challenge now is to wait to be selected. One's work has to be chosen by folk! Hopefully, these two offerings, "The Conversation" and "The journey" will meet and surpass the planners' dreams and expectations. Building and assembly is just organization, work and great attention to detail and safety!

Asher
Hello Asher

These are both intriguing! Would be nice to view them at such a grand scale ! What I don't understand is how one could expect to have these selected without a detailed proposal. I can't image city planers selecting anything based on a couple of images? What am I missing or does the city have an unlimited spending amount for art? How does the process work? I already have a detailed plan on how to steal it and a budget with a 20% contingency for unseen circumstances, if the project was completed. LOL

Best, regards
James
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  #11  
Old April 22nd, 2015, 11:08 AM
Rachel McLain Rachel McLain is offline
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Lovely Asher! I really have enjoyed seeing all your sculptures.

I've been contemplating how to make photography into public art lately, so this is timely for me to see what you're doing. Thanks for sharing!

Rach
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