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  #1  
Old May 13th, 2011, 09:11 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Default Belmont Nevada: Decaying Buildings, Abandoned Trucks and Remnants of Mining Gear!

This was the last shoot on the last day. This was the time for the diehards who stayed to the very end!

The main street has a gas station and the top of the hill is dominated by a well-stocked bar, a friendly place for motorcyclists and locals as well as scant tourists.

The sites to be photographed are the remnants of stone and wooden buildings, several magnificent trucks driven into the landscape and being consumed by the elements and nature. In addition, there's an array of well-maintained mining machinery, ready to attract snapshots. The challenge is to photograph them without the park benches that seem to be requisite for all tourist spots. I'd rather they had a water fountain!

My first interest was to scout, as I usually do, taking freehand pictures with my digital camera, to return and then choose my subjects for 8x10 film. My first shot was a collapsed wooden building.



Asher Kelman: Hut Reclaimed by Wildgrass

Canon 5DII 24mm TSE B&W blend with color

This establishes the direction of things. There is no attempt to preserve the buildings or several cars driven into a field and bushes respectively and abandoned!




Asher Kelman: Car Rusting in a Field

Canon 5DII 24mm TSE B&W

With this brief background, the film pictures and perhaps more digital images will follow.

Asher
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Last edited by Asher Kelman; May 30th, 2011 at 02:12 AM.
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  #2  
Old May 14th, 2011, 05:18 AM
Sandrine Bascouert Sandrine Bascouert is offline
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I really like the car with this strange depth of field, also this sparkling white spots all around that shape the metal form. The point of view for the first one looks weird, it puzzles me, even the tone puzzles me. It's not that I don't like it, I don't "understand" it. Maybe it's more like an abstract shape for me.
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  #3  
Old May 14th, 2011, 07:23 AM
Eddie Gunks Eddie Gunks is offline
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This one of the same truck using a P&S series I. this is a soft focus lens. jim galli is famous for using these lenses. he has created a market for these lenses. they are highly sought after and are very expensive lenses.

you either like them or you hate them. they take practice to get them to perform well.

i shot this wide open (15 inch lens at about f5). stopped down would remove some of the softness.

8x10 B&W film.



Eddie Gunks: Jim's Famous Truck at Belmont!

Eddie

Last edited by Asher Kelman; May 14th, 2011 at 09:50 AM.
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  #4  
Old May 14th, 2011, 07:24 AM
Eddie Gunks Eddie Gunks is offline
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Here is one of Jim Galli (or maybe Tom Selleck?). same lens.




Eddie Gunks: Jim Galli


Eddie

Last edited by Asher Kelman; May 14th, 2011 at 09:52 AM.
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  #5  
Old May 14th, 2011, 07:51 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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This is a nice picture. The message that the hut is reclaimed by nature is clear from the composition, probably increased by the use of a wide angle and low point of view. I also like the fact that the horizon is curved, it reinforces the message that the hut is overgrown.
I like the increased contrast and blocked shadows in the grass, it makes for more drama.
I am not so sure about the selective color. I see the problem that you are trying to solve: the sky would not detach from the horizon if it were black, but I find the process tacky. I think I would prefer a full color picture, maybe with changed colors to give us the impression of slide film or even cross processing.

Then, of course, real film users will find this post process tricks giving an air of "film look" a crime against good taste, so your mileage may vary, etc...




I like the B&W conversion and the light here. I am not so sure about the strange depth of field, the grass at the front, the empty zone on the top right and the tilted horizon. I am not so sure about the message either. I think that this image would be o.k. as a part of a series, but cannot be judged in isolation.
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  #6  
Old May 14th, 2011, 10:07 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post

This is a nice picture. The message that the hut is reclaimed by nature is clear from the composition, probably increased by the use of a wide angle and low point of view. I also like the fact that the horizon is curved, it reinforces the message that the hut is overgrown.
I like the increased contrast and blocked shadows in the grass, it
makes for more drama.
I am not so sure about the selective color. I see the problem that you are trying to solve: the sky would not detach from the horizon if it were black, but I find the process tacky. I think I would prefer a full color picture, maybe with changed colors to give us the impression of slide film or even cross processing.

Then, of course, real film users will find this post process tricks giving an air of "film look" a crime against good taste, so your mileage may vary, etc...

Jerome,

The major challenge for me is that I am at home with beautiful portraits of people and majestic architecture. Still life has totally new demands and esthetics. I sought to then carve out a style befitting to the nature of the project.


There is no selective in color. No part has been bleached. Rather this is a taming of everything that's not important using a red filter in the B&W conversion and blending it back with the color. I designed this to materialize a drama of the earth consuming the building. Yes, a series would confirm whether this is a good way to go.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
I like the B&W conversion and the light here. I am not so sure about the strange depth of field, the grass at the front, the empty zone on the top right and the tilted horizon. I am not so sure about the message either. I think that this image would be o.k. as a part of a series, but cannot be judged in isolation.

As you will see from Eddie's work with the soft focus Pinkham & Smith barrel lens of 100 years fame, this is the esthetic I was seeking. My soft focus lenses, I hope will be sharper and soft too. Each lens has it's own character. This was a development after lenses became so clinical and sharp that folk wanted a more romantic ethereal look.

This abandoned truck is again being taken back by nature, but it seemed to be doing it willingly, unlike the case of the dismembered hut being devoured by the long grasses like primordial beasts. This truck became a favorite of Jim's and his work inspired me to explore the value of limited focus.

There is no horizon shown, BTW, that's path and I'll correct it. Thanks for pointing that out. The 8x10 film I took has still to be processed. I did that with a sharp lens and plan to blur the b.g.!

Asher
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  #7  
Old May 14th, 2011, 10:17 AM
Doug Kerr Doug Kerr is offline
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Hi, Asher,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post



Asher Kelman: Hut Reclaimed by Wildgrass

Canon 5DII 24mm TSE B&W blend with color
This is just stunning - and more than a bit scary.

The B&W/color blend works wonderfully here.

Perhaps the message (not that we need one) is that time's decay does not necessarily vitiate "potency".

And potency can in fact be "scary".

I also somehow have the feeling that this hut might have been at one time on fowl's legs. (Cue the Moussorgsky, please, itself a blend of B&W and color.)

Best regards,

Doug
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  #8  
Old May 14th, 2011, 10:20 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandrine Bascouert View Post
I really like the car with this strange depth of field, also this sparkling white spots all around that shape the metal form. The point of view for the first one looks weird, it puzzles me, even the tone puzzles me. It's not that I don't like it, I don't "understand" it. Maybe it's more like an abstract shape for me.
Sandrine,

The strange DOF was made out of deference to what I owe to Jim in bringing to us the esthetics of soft focus lenses that were used with movie stars of the early 20th century. These were the best optics at the time and removed subjects from meticulous even "documentation" to artistic loving representations. Unfortunately, most digital work lauds even illumination and biting sharpness, which, here is being studiously avoided. My B&W picture of the car, which Jim has photographed years ago, were built and stitched with the goal of referencing his work while stepping out, myself and doing this in my own way.

Asher
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  #9  
Old May 14th, 2011, 02:53 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post

There is no selective in color. No part has been bleached. Rather this is a taming of everything that's not important using a red filter in the B&W conversion and blending it back with the color. I designed this to materialize a drama of the earth consuming the building.
The way you came to the result is not really important, as long at it looks like selective color, does it?


Quote:
As you will see from Eddie's work with the soft focus Pinkham & Smith barrel lens of 100 years fame, this is the esthetic I was seeking. My soft focus lenses, I hope will be sharper and soft too. Each lens has it's own character. This was a development after lenses became so clinical and sharp that folk wanted a more romantic ethereal look.
I am sorry, but those soft focus lenses of 100 years fame give a completely different unsharpness to the picture. As you noted, each lens has its own character.

If you want to emulate the look of those old lenses, try the following in PS: duplicate a sharp image in a layer and blur that layer. Depending on the amount and type of blur and the percentage of transparency, you should get interesting effects.
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  #10  
Old May 14th, 2011, 05:17 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
The way you came to the result is not really important, as long at it looks like selective color, does it?
Jerome,

Not in the slightest. The grass and wood have little color naturally.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
I am sorry, but those soft focus lenses of 100 years fame give a completely different unsharpness to the picture. As you noted, each lens has its own character.
When I made that remark, it has a special meaning. The character of the P&S lenses are pretty well one family. Making one from a simpler construction, one might get different effects. I own a number of brilliant lenses of these formulations. You will see the work down the road.

Asher
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  #11  
Old May 14th, 2011, 06:17 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Gunks View Post
This one of the same truck using a P&S series I. this is a soft focus lens. jim galli is famous for using these lenses. he has created a market for these lenses. they are highly sought after and are very expensive lenses.

you either like them or you hate them. they take practice to get them to perform well.

i shot this wide open (15 inch lens at about f5). stopped down would remove some of the softness.

8x10 B&W film.


Eddie Gunks: Jim's Famous Truck at Belmont!


Eddie,

Your angle is better than mine, LOL! You made a better sense of the truck giving itself up! Very different from Jim's work and also just works. I also didn't exploit the reflections on the glass. The result with the Pinkham & Smith glass are paintbrush splashes of angel dust. This can only be achieved with a lens like yours which gives a perfect focus and then from the periphery adds a second layer of OOF highlights. I think this is magic.

Asher
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  #12  
Old May 15th, 2011, 12:08 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
The character of the P&S lenses are pretty well one family. Making one from a simpler construction, one might get different effects. I own a number of brilliant lenses of these formulations. You will see the work down the road.
That will be enjoyable. As I said, the results of those soft-focus "pictorial" lenses on large format is rather unique.

BTW, there is a web site with an history of these lenses, if someone is interested:

http://www.antiquecameras.net/softfocuslenses.html
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  #13  
Old May 15th, 2011, 01:26 AM
fahim mohammed fahim mohammed is offline
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I approached these pictures somehow knowing that we were going after ' yesteryear '.

Asher, the hut is indeed stunnigly done. I do not care, except in the very last micro instant..then too reluctantly maybe, for the horizond or the verticals.

Do I get to feel, experience what the photog was after.

In this instance, the answer, for me, is an unqualified ' yes '.

Let others discuss technical issues. I want to see more ' untechnical ' images from Jim, Eddie and yourself.

Talking about ' soft lenses '. No such thing. There are with me modern clinical lenses, the asphs
from leica. Then I went in search of Mandler lenses. Peter, originally of Zeiss, has his own look lenses. I love them too!

Different look. I love the look of ' soft lenses '.

Regards.
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  #14  
Old May 15th, 2011, 10:34 AM
Ben Rubinstein Ben Rubinstein is offline
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That first pic looks like something out of a horror film Asher!
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  #15  
Old May 15th, 2011, 10:38 AM
Jim Galli Jim Galli is offline
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truck, weeds, verito

This is 7X11 inches film

Click on the link above to get a feel for film
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  #16  
Old May 15th, 2011, 10:40 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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That first pic looks like something out of a horror film Asher!
Exactly! The devouring of human achievements by nature is indeed horrific. That's how I felt, faced with the abandonment and loss of so much, after such great human efforts to exploit the ground's hidden riches. Each building spoke thus!

Asher
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Old May 15th, 2011, 05:49 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Galli View Post

truck, weeds, verito

This is 7X11 inches film

Click on the link above to get a feel for film
Jim,

I'm impressed with the reduction in view from what I had imagined, of course with my 150 mm lens! You have pulled out the essential interaction between the abandoned truck and the bushes it met, many decades ago!

Asher
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Old May 30th, 2011, 01:06 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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This next view caught my attention because I could see at the skyline a brand new Church in this tiny Ghost town! So I took an ultrawide picture where the church becomes another red feature that fits in between the remnants of decay, like a seed.

The front, of course is overgrown as the natural ingrowth of vegetation relentlessly grabs every square inch in it's invasion to what once was a thriving community.


Again this is taken in color with Portra 400 NC using the 150 mm Super Symmar XL, (35 mm equivalent of ~ 20mm) and an aperture of 44.





Asher Kelman: The Last Inner Walls, Complete Image

Belmont Mining Town, Nevada 2011

Portra NC Color Film: scan of Print






Asher Kelman: The Last Inner Walls, Complete Image B&W

Belmont Mining Town, Nevada 2011

Portra NC Color Film: scan of Print, Converted to B&W





One of the great advantages of having a huge sheet of 8x10 film, is that one can have a more opportunities in finding ways to present what one imagines. There's such a lot to see that one needs time to contemplate what to show and how to do this with effect. So here is my crop down to what's most important to me today. In color, it's already more focused in the new version.





Asher Kelman: The Last Inner Walls

Belmont Mining Town, Nevada 2011

Portra NC Color Film: scan of Print




Still, once again, for demonstrating the drama of the events which mean nothing less than the death of a town and it's struggle to find a basis for continuing, tonalities alone serve the images purpose.





Asher Kelman: The Last Inner Walls

Belmont Mining Town, Nevada 2011

Portra NC Color Film: scan of Print B&W Derivative


I must say I'm so pleased with the opportunity to deal with one wide image with no need to stitch anything nor worry about resolution. However, the work now is in processing film and scanning, so there's no free ride. Still, with film, this is a very efficient way of avoiding megapixel envy of modern digital backs, LOL!

I'm having a ball! Thanks to Jim Galli for hosting such an amazing workshop!

Asher
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Old May 30th, 2011, 11:04 AM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asher Kelman View Post
One of the great advantages of having a huge sheet of 8x10 film, is that one can have a more opportunities in finding ways to present what one imagines.

I strongly disagree. Move closer. If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough. - Robert Capa

Frankly, Asher, you have got this wonderful wide-angle lens. Why not take advantage of the increased perspective effects it allows?
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Old May 30th, 2011, 11:46 AM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome Marot View Post
I strongly disagree. Move closer. If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough. - Robert Capa

Frankly, Asher, you have got this wonderful wide-angle lens. Why not take advantage of the increased perspective effects it allows?
Jerome,

I love Capa's work! One of the greatest photographers ever. Sadly he died when he got out of his jeep to get "closer" and stepped on a landmine! I have no problem going "close" as you can see from the hut and the car above in the very first post in this thread and 2 feet from the truck here. In fact, that's how I almost always love to use this wonderful lens! So I need no encouragement to achieve such dramatic perspective that the ultrawide lens offers. Here the angle of coverage was exploited instead. That was the value to me for what I wanted. I do agree, however, that a close picture would add a new drama with that lens, next time.

When I composed the picture I was very happy with my point of view and wanted to get the shadows in the foreground! It was no accident or laziness. I spend considerable time walking around and sometimes sketching pictures with my 5DII, well before I set up the tripod for the film camera. This composition I chose. I'm still pleased with that. Nevertheless, I thought of the new composition, within the original, works too and I like that! What I had wanted and I captured were the strong shadows and then the plants approaching the ruins.





Asher Kelman: The Last Inner Walls, Complete Image B&W

Belmont Mining Town, Nevada 2011

Portra NC Color Film: scan of Print, Converted to B&W



The position I chose also allowed me to get the little church in the position I wanted between the ruins.

There's another point Jerome. Art should be iterative. Coming home and seeing the picture should give rise to new possibilities. The idea for me is not to present what we all see but what we imagine. If it means emphasizing some area by increased contrast or even cropping, I have no hesitation. To me, no commitment made to the scene is sacred, just what I made to my imagination.

Asher
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  #21  
Old May 30th, 2011, 02:07 PM
Jerome Marot Jerome Marot is offline
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There's another point Jerome. Art should be iterative
As a general rule: yes. You are certainly allowed to take wide-angle pictures and select and crop back home, if that is the way you can get what you want. I do that myself, sometimes, so I won't criticize it.

But in that particular case, I really think that moving past the bushes with that wonderful wide-angle of yours will have produced a far more dramatic picture than simply staying on the spot and using a longer focal (or cropping, which will give the same result).
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Old May 30th, 2011, 11:10 PM
Ron Morse Ron Morse is offline
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I am really enjoying these. I hope you guys have more.

I like what you did to the last one Asher. It looks like a clear sky with wispy clouds, full moon night shot. Beautiful to me.
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Old May 30th, 2011, 11:22 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Morse View Post
I am really enjoying these. I hope you guys have more.

I like what you did to the last one Asher. It looks like a clear sky with wispy clouds, full moon night shot. Beautiful to me.
Thanks for your kind words, Ron!

Ruins on a beautiful sunny day seems to lack the despair of the truth of the matter. Looking at the scene, it can just appear benign remnants of another world. however there's a lot more.

So, eliciting the extraordinary meanings from the ordinary matter one observes is the challenge. That's why one wants to work on compositions to bring out feelings rather than a catalog of facts. Having been there once does generate ideas for the next time around.

Asher
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Old April 23rd, 2014, 11:33 PM
Asher Kelman Asher Kelman is online now
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I give my own thread a boost to remind me I need to work more on this set of images.

Asher
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