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Jewelry editorial

Graham Mitchell

New member
I used the 80mm f2 Xenotar with 1.4x Longar this time. I was working tethered with greyscale previews on the Mac, which makes it very easy to shoot a mono job such as this.

 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Graham,

Dynamic composition of her hands around her head. Perfect skin of youth and the straight parallel lines of her hair counterbalances it all. I simply love the clean stark beauty of it! Outstanding!

How is the conversion achieved? It's so fitting.

Asher
 
I used the 80mm f2 Xenotar with 1.4x Longar this time. I was working tethered with greyscale previews on the Mac, which makes it very easy to shoot a mono job such as this.

Hi Graham,

I've seen other work from you, and I know you are a competent photographer. However, I'm not sure about this image. Maybe Ken hit the nail on its head when he asked:

What is your client for this image trying to sell?
I know Ken as a keen observer, and I agree with him (although perhaps for different reasons).

To me, as a guy, the female portrait draws a bit of attention (also for a few wrong reasons, like less than flattering pose, left hand as a fist, eyes different size due to fist). But if the target audience is women, then perhaps it would have been better to just show hands (less sense of competition/judgement). Perhaps some of our female participants could comment on how they experience this? Maybe this wasn't meant to promote jewelry, and there is another story behind it?

Just trying to be helpful, giving critique alone is too easy,
Bart
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
To me, as a guy, the female portrait draws a bit of attention (also for a few wrong reasons, like less than flattering pose, left hand as a fist, eyes different size due to fist).
Bart,

I like it just because it is not what's expected and the face is stretched on the left side. The lip then is opened and pouted by her hand and it says, "Yes, I'm spoiled perhaps, but I'm worth it!" There's even an implied willingness to be engage with her onlooker.

This is a very confident lady who does not need to be perfect and can be at home and just showing her jewelry and having attention placed on her. This is guess might be the "bad girl" look.

Having said that, how it would be used depends on the creativity of the art department. I personally would see this in her book as some path she could be directed on. However, a good designer might be delighted with such a picture.

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
But if the target audience is women, then perhaps it would have been better to just show hands (less sense of competition/judgement). Perhaps some of our female participants could comment on how they experience this? Maybe this wasn't meant to promote jewelry, and there is another story behind it?
Hmmm may I try some binary thinking of my own?
maybe the targeted audience is males (as potential buyers…)
maybe the targeted audience is female (searching for similarity/mirroring…)

Now the real question, already asked, is about the title (editorial)… let's wait a clarification by Graham!
 

Graham Mitchell

New member
Me either. Since Graham's not being at all forthcoming with contextual details to tell the image's story I guess we're left to take the image at its face value or just leave it alone. Shrug.
Well this is an example of an image which I had almost no control over, so I can't really explain the choices. My client was a stylist who chose the model, dressed the model, made up the model, asked for this pose, and showed me mood shots in black and white with this feeling. She was very happy with the result because it was exactly what she asked for. Hope that clears things up :) Some of the works I post here are almost completely controlled by me (creatively speaking) but not this one. As it happens, I like the result!
 
Well this is an example of an image which I had almost no control over, so I can't really explain the choices. My client was a stylist who chose the model, dressed the model, made up the model, asked for this pose, and showed me mood shots in black and white with this feeling. She was very happy with the result because it was exactly what she asked for. Hope that clears things up :) Some of the works I post here are almost completely controlled by me (creatively speaking) but not this one. As it happens, I like the result!
Hi Graham,

Thanks for adding some context. When the customer wants it this way and is happy, I guess all is fine. Please don't take the comments too personal, and keep sharing stuff. One can always learn something from the reactions of this global audience.

Cheers,
Bart
 

Ken Tanaka

pro member
Thank you for the contextual detail Graham. The reason I asked was that this does not look like a typical fashion snap. It actually does look more like a theatrical headshot. But all that finger bling made me wonder if jewelry wasn't the product. But, since the jewelry is not lit specially or is sharply in focus the mystery remained.

Hard to see how a stylist would gain favor from such an image but it sounds like you just brought the camera.
 
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