• Please use real names.

    Greetings to all who have registered to OPF and those guests taking a look around. Please use real names. Registrations with fictitious names will not be processed. REAL NAMES ONLY will be processed

    Firstname Lastname

    Register

    We are a courteous and supportive community. No need to hide behind an alia. If you have a genuine need for privacy/secrecy then let me know!
  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

19 inch versus 24 inch monitors?

Peter Mendelson

New member
I currently use a Planar PX191 19 inch monitor, along with a Viewsonic 17 inch monitor set up as a second monitor. The Planar is a nice monitor, although not particularly known for photo editing. I was reading about 24 inch monitors (Dell, Apple, Eizo CE), and was wondering how much bigger using a 24 inch screen feels over a 19 inch. I saw the Apple in the store (actually I think the Apple is a 23 inch), and it was hard to really get a good sense of whether I would notice a huge difference in monitor space when working in Photoshop.

Anyone?

Thanks,

Peter
 
Peter,
in two words: it does.
If I had funds for it, I would not hesitate getting one.
OTOH, I would probably opt for saving a bit longer and getting one of them 30" :)
Cheers!
 

Cem_Usakligil

Active member
Peter,

A 24" LCD monitor is definitely recommended. I use 2x DELL 20" ones on my desktop which gives me 2x1680x1050 pixels in total. This is a wonderful way of getting more pixels out of a tight budget. Unfortunately, many software packages do not work properly with dual monitors. If I had the choice today, I'd probably choose for a single 24-30" setup which gives 1920x1200 (i.e. it can handle real HD-TV resolutions up to 1080i/p).

Points of attention (YMMV):
1) Good dead pixel guarantee by the seller/manufacturer
2) Backlight leakage (must be as little as possible)
3) Monitor must come with separate controls for RGB in order to calibrate more easily
4) Color rendition and gamut: better/more expensive brands such as Eizo are known for delivering consistently good results.

BTW, please note that DELL and Apple source their high end LCD screens from the same manufacturer (LG, IIRC). The execution of DELL is functionally richer while Apple makes beautiful monitors to look at ;-).

Regards,

Cem
 

ChrisDauer

New member
Cem Usakligil said:
Peter,

A 24" LCD monitor is definitely recommended. I use 2x DELL 20" ones on my desktop which gives me 2x1680x1050 pixels in total. This is a wonderful way of getting more pixels out of a tight budget. Unfortunately, many software packages do not work properly with dual monitors. If I had the choice today, I'd probably choose for a single 24-30" setup which gives 1920x1200 (i.e. it can handle real HD-TV resolutions up to 1080i/p).
Cem
I use 2 Dell 20"s at home too, but each can pull 1600x1200. So combined it's 3200x1200. I haven't tried opening across both because heaven knows I've probably got the help files plus an internet search up on how to do the darn thing I'm trying to do, on the right side.

From a personal perspective, I really like this set up. Not as big a fan of the 24" or 30" models, but that's just me.
 

Nill Toulme

New member
As you're moving into LCDs from CRTs, the first thing to be aware of is "native resolution." LCDs have one, CRTs don't. That means you want to run your LCD at the resolution it's designed for, not something else. And most 19" LCDs are designed for 1280x1024, while most 20" and 21" LCDs are designed for 1600x1200. So, if you want 1600x1200 (and it's nice), then chances are you're going to have to spring at least for a 20" LCD.

Then there's widescreen vs. the more traditional 3:4 ratio. 24" monitors are mostly, if not exclusively, widescreen. In and of itself that's not necessarily good or bad, it's just a matter of preference. But, and this is an important but, many widescreen LCDs, including most if not all moderately priced 24" screens, have some problems with maintaining consistency in brightness across their entire width, because you have a different viewing angle way over there on the side than you do the part right in front of you. This means the colors or brightness of a given point on the screen may change somewhat as you move your head.

It's all a tradeoff... bigger, better, more expensive. You want good, big, cheap? Pick two (maybe).

FWIW, NEC has two new widescreen models coming out this month that should be very good, and at reasonable price points (i.e., under $2k) — the 2490wuxi and 2690wuxi. The latter is spec'd to cover 92% of the Adobe RGB color space. Most other monitors cover something down around 75%.

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
 

Nill Toulme

New member
Here's the first review of the 2690wuxi. It looks extremely promising, especially as it's apparently coming at a price point well under US$2k.

The 2490 is spec'd like the rest of the xx90 line (which are no slouches by a long shot).

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
 
Thanks for that link, Nil. I'm just coming to the conclusion I need to replace my CRT monitor. The luminance is fading and the delta-Es of profiling are fading from excellent to adequate. I looked around and the 2690 was what caught my attention.

Here is another article that compares an NEC 2190 with a Samsung (!) XL20. It has what for me was useful detail on how to differentiate between upper-range LCD monitors. It may be that Samsung has introdiced an element of price competition that helped bring about the price level of the NEC 2690.

Regards,
Murray
 

KrisCarnmarker

New member
Lifespan

I'm unfortunately in the same situation as Murray. Although my 3 year old Lacie elecronblue still profiles very well (avg dE of 0.6), it has started to flicker and distort. I had not expected that from Lacie. My previous monitor (an LG) did the same after 2 years, but the monitor before that (a Trinitron from Gateway) is still running today, 8 years old. Obviously the image is not so nice anymore, but it doesn't flicker and distort.

Anyway, for me at least, the question of lifespan of these monitors is a consideration. I'm happy paying the ca. $1600 for the Samsung, but only if it lasts a reasonable amount of time. To pay some 1.5k every couple of years is not gonna happen! So what is the typical lifespan of these LCSs. And are LED backed different in this respect than CCFL backed?

The Samsung actually looks like a real good buy, except that its 20" sizee is a tad too small, I think. While the NEC 2690 also seems great, 26" is just too large; I just don't have that kind of space. I use the monitor for other things as well, and the angle to my near field monitors would just be too great. The Samsung with in 21" or 22" would be perfect :) Of course, NEC has other sized models but not with the same technology (read gamut, response time, etc.).
 

Cem_Usakligil

Active member
... Anyway, for me at least, the question of lifespan of these monitors is a consideration. I'm happy paying the ca. $1600 for the Samsung, but only if it lasts a reasonable amount of time. To pay some 1.5k every couple of years is not gonna happen! So what is the typical lifespan of these LCSs. And are LED backed different in this respect than CCFL backed?...
Very valid questions Kris.

I bought a couple of Dell 2005FWP monitors two years ago. They were first class monitors for photo work, very expensive at that time too. These 20" 1680x1050 screens (used to) profile very well, not so anymore.

Also, they suffer from what they call a pixel persistency, and it is getting worse recently. Pixel persistency is similar to the etching on CRT monitors, but theoretically reversible. One has to use a screen saver, change positions of application windows often, switch off the monitor when not in use, etc. I have been doing just that and the pixels are then reset. But in those areas of the screen where this issue is most visible, the persistency reappears very soon. I am not happy.

So I am back to square 1, got rid of my Trinitron CRTs but my LCDs are not much better on the long term it seems. I am a bit skeptical to be honest and would like to hear about other people's experiences as well.

Cheers,
 
Top