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Just for Fun No C&C will be given: 2009 in Focus: Best of Times photography

Nigel Allan

New member
I just stumbled upon think link through a Twitter contact. It is hard to pick just one which is my favourite.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2uD6lB/www.latimes.com/news/local/photography/la-2009photos-html,0,5326045.htmlstory/r:t


The most refreshing aspect though for me is that 'pure' photography is still alive and well and that these strong images work for the most part due to strong composition, timing, framing and all the 'traditional' elements that have made photography into the medium it is.

These are chosen and work because they are good images, not because they are well 'processed'. I find the reliance on heavy digital 'Photoshopping' which is the scourge of 'amateur' photography magazines and most photo fora, quite depressing actually and usually want to vomit when I pick up one of these magazines off the shelf only to find them full of images which they hold up as examples of excellent work which look more like digital paintings than photos. Just my opinion - you don't have to agree with it. After all, you're entitled to be wrong :)
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Nigel, thanks for the link. Once again convinces me that the photographs with all humans are generally
those that reflect the joys, trial and tribulations of us all as humans. The emotional content is what drives
a photo.

Regards.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The most refreshing aspect though for me is that 'pure' photography is still alive an

I just stumbled upon think link through a Twitter contact. It is hard to pick just one which is my favourite.

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2uD6lB/www.latimes.com/news/local/photography/la-2009photos-html,0,5326045.htmlstory/r:t


The most refreshing aspect though for me is that 'pure' photography is still alive and well and that these strong images work for the most part due to strong composition, timing, framing and all the 'traditional' elements that have made photography into the medium it is.

These are chosen and work because they are good images, not because they are well 'processed'. I find the reliance on heavy digital 'Photoshopping' which is the scourge of 'amateur' photography magazines and most photo fora, quite depressing actually and usually want to vomit when I pick up one of these magazines off the shelf only to find them full of images which they hold up as examples of excellent work which look more like digital paintings than photos. Just my opinion - you don't have to agree with it. After all, you're entitled to be wrong :)


This one picture shows how right you are! We tend to be over-impressed with fabulous photographs made by a team of 30 talented ad folk with clever lighting and beautiful models. We're impressed by intelligent design and composition of the art photo. Who can't fall for a perfect landscape in wine country or a stone castle against a stormy coastline.

However, we need to look more to real time photography and not just staged or photoshopped work to show our photographic skills. All can be great photography, but images that reflect poignant moments or the special joys and challenges of life, should be the most respected and valued.

Thanks for this very special link.

Asher
 
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