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2022 Powwow Pikogan, Quebec, Canada

Oddly enough, this is not at all my genre of photography because anyone that knows me knows I do a lot of still life images, many floral.

But, I went to a POWWOW on Saturday with a friend of mine in Pikogan, Quebec. I thought since not everyone has the chance to see these type of festivals, especially if you are not in Canada or the United States, that it might be fun to post some.

If I see people enjoy them, I'll post a few more in the days to come.

powwow1.jpg



powwow2.jpg



powwow3.jpg



powwow4.jpg



powwow5.jpg


 
Sorry, I wanted to make them bigger, but there was not the usual choice to post larger: with the latest software update the word “insert” on the top of each tiny picture must be clicked on to get the choice of whole picture or just the icon!

So I did that for you! ❤️
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Maggie,

Nothing is trivial here or merely lovely!

This will be one of my highlight moments in OPF. I am so happy to see such a welcome and happy celebration of culture that is precious to us.

Your pictures make me feel uplifted. Look at the devotion of the children as they prepare to shoulder their responsibility for continuing the traditions.

So this series is not mere beauty of objects, but representation of eons of families striving with the elements of nature to sustain themselves and be balanced with the earth.

Your real life photography is amongst the most delicate and loving I have seen and is noble.

Kudos,

Asher
 
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Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Thank you! Indeed I have never seen such a festival. Neither had I thought it would also involve young children (but that is normal, of course). How often do these happen?
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Congratulations on this sensational series of photographs, Maggie. Beautiful and thoughtful compositions that truly capture and celebrate the spirit of the festival.

Best
Tony
 
Maggie,

Nothing is trivial here or merely lovely!

This will be one of my highlight moments in OPF. I am so happy to see such a welcome and happy celebration of culture that is precious to us.

Your pictures make me feel uplifted. Look at the devotion of the children as they prepare to shoulder their responsibility for continuing the traditions.

So this series is not mere beauty of objects, but representation of eons of families striving with the elements of nature to sustain themselves and be balanced with the earth.

Your real life photography is amongst the most delicate and loving I have seen and is noble.

Kudos,

Asher
Thank you so much Asher. I know that I'm not great at this type of photography, but the ceremonies and the festivities were so wonderful, I was so pleased to be able to take pictures when protocol allowed. There were moments where we were asked not to, and of course, respected that but wish I could have shown you these important things. It was heartwarming, joyful and a beautiful mix of people from many nationalities, tribal and non-tribal to celebrate their richness. I will be posting more photos in a bit!
 
Thank you! Indeed I have never seen such a festival. Neither had I thought it would also involve young children (but that is normal, of course). How often do these happen?
Thank you Jerome. Yes, there were many children and this year, the theme for the festival actually was "Chaque Enfant Compte" "Every Child Counts". This has to do with honoring the children that had been forcibly sent to
boarding schools, the children that went missing and the children that murdered. All tragic events but this was not a tragic event, it was full of joy and normally when it starts, the elder come into the space first, but this year, it was the children. The best behaved children
I've seen a quite a while. Not that they were constrained but instead full of joy and no complaining and really proud of their heritage.
Apparently, Powwows have been going on for hundreds of years, but there were periods where they did not happen because the government was trying to turn this people into something they are not. Trying to force them into molds that would make them
the same as us. In those years, many indigenous people did not powwow for fear of being reprimanded.
In our region, powwows started about 15 years ago. On and off. A few times in the town I live, and a few times at Lac Simon, a First Nations Reserve. The one in Pikogan is on its 8th edition but there was none for 2 years because of the pandemic.
Pikogan is about 1 hour by car on the highway from where I live.
There is usually one a year in different parts of the province and in different provinces. I'm sure that is the same in the U.S. Around here they only happen during the summer months as our winters are cold.
The festival that happens here, is with bands from around here, from Ontario and some from the United States, mostly around the Great Lakes area.
The people are Anishinaabe which include Algonquin, Cree, Ojibway for the most part. Although different tribes, they are apparently related tribes.
Sorry if I'm rambling, but to give you an idea of the sounds, there are drummers that drum in big circles that represent the beating of the heart of Mother Earth. They also do what they call throat singing which is deep reverberations that you can actually feel
the vibration in your body if you are nearby.
I'm glad you found this interesting :) Maggie
 
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