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Another new type Gazaina multispectral

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):


(studio shot using a modified Xenon flash)
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Quadriptych of human vision, UV, simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):


(studio shot using a modified Xenon flash)
Here, we win easily!

I would wish for a switch to UV if we could do it at will, but we are damned fortunate to have been given human vision!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I woudl agree! If I could just ADD UV as another color to what I see, now that I would consider...
While we are going for that, why not add a zoom lens! Interesting that hunters don’t seem to have ever managed to evolve zoom optics!

Perhaps if they did, they would become so efficient that they could wipe out their food supply and so the “advantage” would be self limiting for that genetic line!

In this game, prey must escape sufficiently often to be able to over reproduce by some safety margin!

Asher
 
It is fascinating that so many creatures even including birds, dogs and cats can see in the UV range. Too bad that we can't. There is such an astounding variety of eyes amongst living species on our planet.
 

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
It is fascinating that so many creatures even including birds, dogs and cats can see in the UV range. Too bad that we can't. There is such an astounding variety of eyes amongst living species on our planet.
Well Peter: Dog and cats CANNOT SEE UV!! Some birds, bees, butterflies, fish, and crustaceans do...
Agreed, a very astounding variety is there, namely a crab that sees 255 (!!!) colors especially.
 

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
While we are going for that, why not add a zoom lens! Interesting that hunters don’t seem to have ever managed to evolve zoom optics!

Perhaps if they did, they would become so efficient that they could wipe out their food supply and so the “advantage” would be self limiting for that genetic line!

In this game, prey must escape sufficiently often to be able to over reproduce by some safety margin!

Asher
Some birds have some sort of zoom or better tele-lens built into their eyes, as the density of receptors in a very narrow spot on their fovea is so high, that they have increadibly high resolution there...
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Some birds have some sort of zoom or better tele-lens built into their eyes, as the density of receptors in a very narrow spot on their fovea is so high, that they have increadibly high resolution there...
A wonderful advantage. I would like a full size MF sensor with that fovea pixel-dense central high resultion feature. One does not need peripheral information except for aporoaching threads and context.

But as hunting skills improve, the species risks destroying its food supply and extinction by over-success! So hunters MUST lose a majority of the time or else the game is over in a few cycles. I wonder what the safe level of Hunter success is. It has to be based on the relative reproductive rates and survival of hunter and hunted and the reliability of the food supply of the hunted!

Of course. A search reveals a lot of study results of hunter-prey mathematics!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It could be that some flower platforms are best as disguising the pollinators from their common predators!

Why didn’t I think of that before!!

Well so far I have found no scientific reports on the “safe haven” effect of flower platforms, so perhaps I have had an original thought here! Unlikely but possible!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
To add to the idea that the UV patterns might help pollinators get information on flowers usefull to them, there is some evidence that in addition to attractive colors and scents, the flower also signals electrically to at least some insects, such as the bumble bee. The hairs on the body will bristle as the charge difference between the negative-my charged flower and the positively charged beef is reflected in the bristle movement, as they arecrepelked from each other.

Flowers that have a bee on it or recently taken the nectar have a lower electrical charge and the incoming needs can sense that!

Asher
 

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
It could be that some flower platforms are best as disguising the pollinators from their common predators!

Why didn’t I think of that before!!

Well so far I have found no scientific reports on the “safe haven” effect of flower platforms, so perhaps I have had an original thought here! Unlikely but possible!

Asher
Far from that! Flowers are being used as hunting grounds by some clever insects for instance which (ab)use the flower's ability to attrract pollinators and feed on them - the famous crab spider for instance!! It is dark in UV light, so enhances even the attraction of the flower to pollinators! I have photographed that and have written about it here: Crab Spider on Tulip
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Far from that! Flowers are being used as hunting grounds by some clever insects for instance which (ab)use the flower's ability to attrract pollinators and feed on them - the famous crab spider for instance!! It is dark in UV light, so enhances even the attraction of the flower to pollinators! I have photographed that and have written about it here: Crab Spider on Tulip
Fabulous! Did you watch the spider catch prey?

Asher
 
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