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Fine Black and white.... Wide vista landscapes with sky

janet Smith

pro member



Isle of Skye​

Recently I have had to work my way through loads of my photographs, and in the process of doing so began to wonder about which would work in black and white, I worked in black and white a lot years ago, but recently I find myself thinking in black and white again.....

This is the 4th of 4 pictures I showed in my initial post of 4 different B&W images, here
 
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It's hard to respond to the Isle of Skye picture without knowing what I am looking at. I take it that the picture I see on my monitor screen approximates the pictorial content of a photograph but I would love to imagine the experience of being with the photograph itself. For example:

Of what medium is the photograph; gelatin-silver, platinotype, bromoil, what? Is it glossy or matte?

How big is the photograph? Imagining myself in front of a 6x4 foot museum size picture is a totally different experience compared to contemplating a whole plate contact.

Who made the photograph; the credited author or a workshop technician? What is the credited authors relationship to the final work?

Where can I travel to stand in the presence of this photograph, to bask in its radiance in effect? Is it in a gallery, museum, or private collection?

Can I buy this photograph, can I afford it? Being in possession of an expensive piece of art is in itself a "tingle factor" experience.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It's hard to respond to the Isle of Skye picture without knowing what I am looking at. I take it that the picture I see on my monitor screen approximates the pictorial content of a photograph but I would love to imagine the experience of being with the photograph itself. For example:

Of what medium is the photograph; gelatin-silver, platinotype, bromoil, what? Is it glossy or matte?

How big is the photograph? Imagining myself in front of a 6x4 foot museum size picture is a totally different experience compared to contemplating a whole plate contact.

Who made the photograph; the credited author or a workshop technician? What is the credited authors relationship to the final work?

Where can I travel to stand in the presence of this photograph, to bask in its radiance in effect? Is it in a gallery, museum, or private collection?

Can I buy this photograph, can I afford it? Being in possession of an expensive piece of art is in itself a "tingle factor" experience.
Maris,

Off Topic: When you say credit author, you refer to some existing argument in your mind about who gets credit for technical work. A good question that deals with fairness. Authorship is not in discussion here although it's a good new topic to address. Your points on the nature of the print and the importance of technical and artistic skill are valid and we'll use that in the future, I promise.

I'm sensing you feel it's important as to who's fingerprints are on the paper. I can respect your choice here. I'm more concerned with the value I get from giving the image attention. I frankly don't care if Jan made it alone or with 7 assistants advising her. In this context of OPF, my interest is to see pictures that people are proud of that we can share, enjoy and give helpful comment on. In a gallery or museum, my job is to engage or not with the picture. I must find out whether or not it satisfies me. If the work interests me, to buy it, I'd have to have cash to spare. Likely as not, I'll simply go to a museum where that print is shown.

We don't give credit to the brush maker, the silver smelter or the folk making fine paper. These are commodities as are inks and cameras. There are 3 things we can do: plan and record the potential picture and then interpret the recorded image to make delivered file or print. The machines do the rest or we can do it ourselves in the darkroom, as do a number of talented photographers, here, every day.

So would you ever purchase such a print based on a screen image, aside from the big auction houses? Imagine that this is a 16x20 sliver gelatin print on semigloss paper. Would you buy it? For such a hand made print, would you pay $600 or $1200 from someone who is not collected and traded by renowned dealers?

If you can reply these questions, then we have a good new discussion topic and I'll split it off from this thread. I'd love to know your answers.

To get the tingle factor, I'm sure we can get Jan to print it herself as a platinum print. If you pay $17,000, I have no doubt Jan will personally print for you that picture any size you want!





Isle of Skye​

With its limitations on the screen admitted, it interests you and if so, in what way? For me, I obtained pleasure far more than the cost of the time I spent.

Asher

I'm looking forward to being able to mail around a packages of our prints, with a full provenance, as you requested, to review personally. Maybe you can add your positive ideas here.
 

janet Smith

pro member
I frankly don't care if Jan made it alone or with 7 assistants advising her I'm sure we can get Jan to print it herself as a platinum print...... If you pay $17,000, I have no doubt Jan will personally print for you that picture any size you want!
Yup, made by me (alone otherwise the sheep would have run), in one of my favourite spots on the Isle of Skye and yes you could absolutely have a print any size at all for $17,000 (I wish) LOL!!!!!!

But the best thing is to go there and experience the silence, and smell the sweet grass and enjoy the feel of the place. And yes Asher every time we go to Skye we sing "Over the sea to Skye" no doubt almost everyone does, I used to sing my sons to sleep to the same song....
 
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