• Please use real names.

    Greetings to all who have registered to OPF and those guests taking a look around. Please use real names. Registrations with fictitious names will not be processed. REAL NAMES ONLY will be processed

    Firstname Lastname

    Register

    We are a courteous and supportive community. No need to hide behind an alia. If you have a genuine need for privacy/secrecy then let me know!
  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

NEW WORLD ORDER: Putin invades Ukraine

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
it could be pain as you suggest or someone suffering from Parkinsonism, fighting the intention tremor and involuntary movements. But for sure this is highly abnormal!

That pain, you suggest, Jérôme, could be from widespread bone metastases for example from prostate cancer.

Parkinson is a possibility, but would not quite explain the way he retracts his head into his shoulders, would it?
 
Last edited:

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Major international new sources are now making the same comments with Parkinsonism on the list.

The defense minister is reading from notes even though he has almost nothing to say!

It’s like these decaying characters have ordered a zombie army of destruction to continue marching no matter the consequences!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
One can see a bit more here (starts at 0:11):


It is in German, but it is the only source I could find which shows Putin before the interview. One can see him sitting down, adjusting his chair and using his left arm to adjust his jacket and trousers. He looks better on that small segment. But one can still see him pressing his back against the chair.

Maybe he simply has back pain. That is not uncommon at his age.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
No question he has to brace himself with his right hand. That’s the most clearly abnormal pose and pathological evidence of some disorder he’s trying to mask and appear in control of his body.

We just need to see earlier videos of months ago and compare them.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
It is perfectly normal that leaders of various countries visited the head of the Russian state on a semi-regular basis.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It is perfectly normal that leaders of various countries visited the head of the Russian state on a semi-regular basis.
In better times, without the ruling elite, Russia could be a natural fit for NATO! Unfortunately, Soviet dreams and delusion prevent that possibility!

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
An important part of wars are communications. The following article may explain part of the technology Ukraine uses and, in turn, that allows me to understand better some of the recent events in the country:

This type of technology will make cell towers obsolete. I know a number of people using the Starlink service already. I will keep my thoughts on the war to myself.

Best, regards
James
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
… I will keep my thoughts on the war to myself.

Best, regards
James,
You’re joking, James! What leeway do we have to have individual thoughts on unarguable facts?

If someone talks of Vesuvius having destroyed Pompeii, what alternative fact is there for each of us to have our own private thoughts? Obviously morality doesn’t apply, except for a few noble women caught having sex with commoners!

When V2 rockets smashed London, is there any relevant personal choice of judgement?

Yes one could choose different verbs and better adverbs and more fitting adjectives but there’s really no room for unique personal thoughts on actual facts of serious matters.

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Gee Asher

I simply wanted to reply on the subject of communication in regards to the subject of technology. Kind of like when my wife wants to have a conversation in the morning after I have just woken up from a deep delta sleep. Just not interested in commenting on the subject in any form whatsoever.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
This type of technology will make cell towers obsolete.

Starlink is not designed for cell phone access but to replace fixed internet in remote areas. The technology needs antennas which are too large to fit in your pocket and power needs are far higher than what a cellphone battery can store.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Starlink is not designed for cell phone access but to replace fixed internet in remote areas. The technology needs antennas which are too large to fit in your pocket and power needs are far higher than what a cellphone battery can store.
In fact, the Ukrainians need precious gasoline to run generators to power them.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
There are two Starlink kits available. A quick check on the manufacturer's specs shows that the small one uses about 250W and the large one about twice as much. A small generator can handle this. As armies need a generator or some access to power for their needs, this should not add anything noticeable to the overall power needs. Actually, the total consumption can be lower if the army does not need shortwave transmitters, for example.
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
There are two Starlink kits available. A quick check on the manufacturer's specs shows that the small one uses about 250W and the large one about twice as much. A small generator can handle this. As armies need a generator or some access to power for their needs, this should not add anything noticeable to the overall power needs. Actually, the total consumption can be lower if the army does not need shortwave transmitters, for example.
Jerome

I carry a tiny device, smaller than my cell phone that is connected to the satellite system. It enables me to send text messages through my phone in remote areas where cell towers are non existent. A simple charge will last days.
 
Last edited:

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Yes, I know these. As far as I know, 2 systems exist: Garmin InReach (uses Iridium satellites) and Spot X (uses Globalstar satellites).

These work, but for small quantities of data. Starlink allows fast Internet access, but that costs bandwidth and signal to noise ratio, which directly translates to larger antenna systems and much higher energy consumption. That is a hard limit, check the Shannon–Hartley theorem.
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Yes, I know these. As far as I know, 2 systems exist: Garmin InReach (uses Iridium satellites) and Spot X (uses Globalstar satellites).

These work, but for small quantities of data. Starlink allows fast Internet access, but that costs bandwidth and signal to noise ratio, which directly translates to larger antenna systems and much higher energy consumption. That is a hard limit, check the Shannon–Hartley theorem.
Thanks for the link Jerome! The worlds first Android based satellite phone

3102-3144.jpg
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Speed is limited to 60 kbit/s downlink and 15 kbit/s uplink on the Thuraya sat system. Moreover, Thuraya uses geostationary satellites, the lag is noticeable.
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Not good for geolocating and aiming rockets at the Russians!
Speed is limited to 60 kbit/s downlink and 15 kbit/s uplink on the Thuraya sat system. Moreover, Thuraya uses geostationary satellites, the lag is noticeable.
I don't need to aim rockets . I just want to make calls without them dropping off and find out that I have being talking to myself after realizing the other party isn't there?
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
If you only need phone calls, satellite phones have been a reality for the past 20 years. I am not really sure where you live, but in high latitudes, Iridium has an advantage over geosynchronous satellite based systems (Thuraya, Inmarsat...)
 
Top