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Right of passage

Tom dinning

Registrant*
It’s every boys joy when they see their first real fire. Sounds of sirens add to the experience.
We all wait for the first time he lights his own.
32220536-53CE-4AF7-A9E3-BCF54E718845.jpeg
 

Tom dinning

Registrant*
Awesome capture Tom!!
Not me. Sorry I forgot to give credit to Simone Reannon, mother of child who is my grandson (One of). She asked not to be named but I reassured her that she wouldn’t have the police calling and charging her with child abuse.
She’s a raw amateur and send the photos to me for editing. Taken on iPhone. Very low quality. I do what I can.

It’s burn-off time here. 83% of the Northern Territory goes under the torch to reduce ground fuel and hence fire intensity. It all happens between April and August. Not a good time to hang out the washing. The locals have been doing it for 100 000 years to encourage food growth and change the landscape. Worked for them, works for us still.

The process is now tracked and monitored from space. How did they manage 100 000 years ago?
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Not me. Sorry I forgot to give credit to Simone Reannon, mother of child who is my grandson (One of). She asked not to be named but I reassured her that she wouldn’t have the police calling and charging her with child abuse.
She’s a raw amateur and send the photos to me for editing. Taken on iPhone. Very low quality. I do what I can.

It’s burn-off time here. 83% of the Northern Territory goes under the torch to reduce ground fuel and hence fire intensity. It all happens between April and August. Not a good time to hang out the washing. The locals have been doing it for 100 000 years to encourage food growth and change the landscape. Worked for them, works for us still.

The process is now tracked and monitored from space. How did they manage 100 000 years ago?
Your fires are under better control now?
 

Tom dinning

Registrant*
People have such a narrow view of Australia, generally.
Kangaroos, wallabies, koalas and Crocodile Dundee types, rough and uncultured.

This type of burning is atypical of the controlled burning of the indigenous population.
The introduction of weeds such as Gamba grass has increased fuel levels. It grows fast, monopolises ecosystems, burns hot.
The fire you see here is gamba grass eradication.
The controlled burning of native forest is slow, cool fires, encouraging new growth and seed germination. Animals have time to move and trees are not destroyed. Irrespective of new technology the indigenous population have been burning in a controlled and methodical way for a long time. It has been so effective the CSIRO have adopted the methodology for current control methods. It’s one of those cases where old methods work, science now knows why and how.

 
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