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My World: Sculptures in available light

Michael Nagel

Active member
These were taken on two occasions - during an open day of various artist living in the same part of Munich and during a vernissage at the same place. I just took advantage of the light that was there. I will return and hope that it will be possible to repeat some of these shots in a more controlled environment.

There are two different techniques as can be seen:



Now a more classical style:



The artists homepage is linked on the individual pictures on flickr.

Best regards,
Michael
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
These were taken on two occasions - during an open day of various artist living in the same part of Munich and during a vernissage at the same place. I just took advantage of the light that was there. I will return and hope that it will be possible to repeat some of these shots in a more controlled environment.


Hello Michael,

Taking pictures of sculptures allows one to look at the art in so many novel ways that even its creator never envisaged. Here you've chosen limited DOF or else done some blurring. I haven't looked at the EXIF, but I assume this is digital and not film with some tilt or shift.



Kleid?


Here the sharpest focus seems to be at the waist and then it becomes softer elsewhere.



Zerbrechlich


Here the best definition id in the face, whereas the back of the head is much softer.



Blauer Mann


While in this last case, surprisingly, it seems that the front of the bodice is sharpest and not, as one might expect, the face.


So in each case, michael, you have allowed us to be intimate with the art in a particular way that is unique for each work and unlikely to have been considered by anyone else. So your presentations altogether are not neutral, but rather allow us to see experience the art in a limited way always from one vantage point. That's a special restraint which I had not considered before. I have, coincidentally, recently photographed a Rober Graham Sculpture and felt I needed many pictures to give the viewer a sense of the actual sculpture. The problem is that on each occasion I do not reproduce a sense of that work of art but instead create my own art! I'm trying to see whether or not one can evoke the feeling of a sculpture by individual shots at all or even with a series.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
These were taken on two occasions - during an open day of various artist living in the same part of Munich and during a vernissage at the same place. I just took advantage of the light that was there. I will return and hope that it will be possible to repeat some of these shots in a more controlled environment.


Hello Michael,

Taking pictures of sculptures allows one to look at the art in so many novel ways that even its creator never envisaged. Here you've chosen limited DOF or else done some blurring. I haven't looked at the EXIF, but I assume this is digital and not film with some tilt or shift.



Here the sharpest focus seems to be at the waist and then it becomes softer elsewhere. Perhaps she's just tightened the belt and is pleased at he figure, or else, she's being held there?




Here the best definition is found in the anterior neck and face, whereas the back of the head is much softer. This seems to give much more power to the part of man thats seen and still mentions the existence of the high mystery of what lies beneath the surface of a person's presentation in society.




While in this last case, surprisingly, it seems that the front of the bodice is sharpest and not, as one might expect, the face. I can imagine, Rodin having dug up an ancient Chinese Emperor's courtiers, fashions him a new cloak.

So in each case, Michael, you have allowed us to be intimate with the art in a particular way that is unique, for each work and unlikely to have ever been considered by anyone else!

Your presentations altogether are not neutral, but rather allow us to see experience the art in a limited way always from one vantage point. That's a special and valuable restraint which I had not considered in such a positive fashion before! You have exploited your own skills well and achieved a unique reportage of the work from one particular seat in the amphitheater.

BTW, In the past few days, I have been pondering my own inadequacy of evoking the sense of a sculpture by single photographs. I had, coincidentally, photographed a Robert Graham Sculpture and felt I needed many pictures to give the viewer a "sense" of the actual sculpture. The dilemma is that on each attempt, I do not reproduce a sense of that work of art, but instead create my own new derived-art! I'm trying to see whether or not one can even approach the feelings pertinent to a sculpture by individual shots at all, or even with a series?


Asher
 
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