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Shadows on the wall; dramatic, pastoral to abstract!

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Some shadows seem to have their own inherent character. In S.F. the coastal air dives away any dust and the light is clean. At midday the shadows are dramatic on the pastel colored homes which is the fashion.



Asher Kelman: S.F. Fire Escapes on Pastel


one can also mine within an original:




Asher Kelman: S.F. Fire Escapes on Pastel sample


For the cropped portion, I blended a blurred layer with the original to soften it.


Have fun chasing the light!

Asher
 

Mark Hampton

New member
Asher,
this image is fun for me - when I read it I am forced down by the lines which is the opposite of the function of the fire escape - and the split from the pole makes reading it take that bit longer... I guess you could crop the right – but then the wires mirror/compliment the shadows.

Some shadows seem to have their own inherent character. In S.F. the coastal air dives away any dust and the light is clean. At midday the shadows are dramatic on the pastel colored homes which is the fashion.



Asher Kelman: S.F. Fire Escapes on Pastel

Have fun chasing the light!

Asher


Here is a shadow picture to add to the collection - the light in my office was not so clear/clean - its an older image from my phone - reworked when I saw the thread..





as I work - Mark Hampton
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Here is a shadow picture to add to the collection - the light in my office was not so clear/clean - its an older image from my phone - reworked when I saw the thread..




as I work - Mark Hampton

Mark,

The phone is getting to be the camera one always has around! I think it's especially suitable for what I call, "sketching", sampling interesting sights, perspectives, textures that one might want to come back with one's better lenses and film/ bigger chip camera.

This image is interesting and I hope you will work more with the shadows on a seres of times during the day! That means coming early or staying late!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
For a change of mood:)
Mike,

Yes it does immediately change the mood, and that's interesting how shadows can have such diverse influences on mood!



(c) Mike Shimwell

I like this picture and seem to have seen it some time ago? Could that be?

Asher
 

Rachel Foster

New member
I love shadows.

I've posted this before, but it's still a favorite.


Jacob Eliana: Lily With Shadow

This is a still life I'm working on but not satisfied with yet.



Jacob Eliana: Buttefly House
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief

Jacob Eliana: Lily With Shadow

I missed this the first time! Great idea. I'd love to see more space for the shadow to have as its territory. It seems to me that it might, perhaps, need that for balance. Is there any thing more to the right or that's how it was shot?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Shadows can contribute a lot to the atmosphere or just be an ornament drawn by light.

I could not walk past this one yesterday.I loved the simplicity here.

Best regards,
Michael

This is a great catch, indeed! I'd wonder if you might be able to process a separate layer to bring out the "waves" of the trowel marks in the cement stucco of the wall. It might be that this would go up another notch in impact!

Asher
 


Vine and Wall

Gelatin-silver photograph on Agfa Classic MCC111 VC FB, image area 21.0cm X 19.3cm, from a Konica IR750 negative exposed in a Mamiya C330 twin lens reflex camera with a 80mm f2.8 lens and #25 red filter.
 

Mike Shimwell

New member
Maris, interesting as usual. The other new additoinas are also ncie to see.

A recent image.

Mike


Self Reflection - Mike Shimwell
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
This is a great catch, indeed! I'd wonder if you might be able to process a separate layer to bring out the "waves" of the trowel marks in the cement stucco of the wall. It might be that this would go up another notch in impact!
Thanks!

I will try and come back with a different version. It might take a while...

Best regards,
Michael
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief


Vine and Wall

Gelatin-silver photograph on Agfa Classic MCC111 VC FB, image area 21.0cm X 19.3cm, from a Konica IR750 negative exposed in a Mamiya C330 twin lens reflex camera with a 80mm f2.8 lens and #25 red filter.
Maris,

The plants invading the cracks in the concrete make for an interesting balance to the rectanagular forms. I love that 80 mm lens on the Mamiya 330. This is one of the finest treasures folks can buy and for a song. The viewfinder is so bright and it's easy to focus except of course live view is upside down! Why did you choose to use the red filter? Can you get the same effect in choosing your paper contrast?

Asher
 
Maris,

The plants invading the cracks in the concrete make for an interesting balance to the rectanagular forms. I love that 80 mm lens on the Mamiya 330. This is one of the finest treasures folks can buy and for a song. The viewfinder is so bright and it's easy to focus except of course live view is upside down! Why did you choose to use the red filter? Can you get the same effect in choosing your paper contrast?

Asher
The viewfinder of the Mamiya C330 is bright but the image is not upside down. Something worse happens; its right to left reversed. A standard view-camera screen shows an image rotated 180 degrees (upside down and left to right reversed in popular speak) but after the first thousand looks I can't remember it as anything but normal. On the other hand the C330 viewfinder still tricks me. Turn left and the picture goes right, signs read backwards, and horizons tilt the opposite way to the camera...con-fus-ing!

A grey-green vine on grey wall may cast nice shadows but there is more to do. By using Konica IR750 film that features some sensitivity in the infrared it is possible to exploit the high IR reflectivity of chlorophyll and make the leaves glow white. The red filter lets through the IR, blocks nearly 90% of the visible, and the effect is obtained.

It is not often that a world full of small scale chaos yields a simple three tone picture; black, white, grey.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
A grey-green vine on grey wall may cast nice shadows but there is more to do. By using Konica IR750 film that features some sensitivity in the infrared it is possible to exploit the high IR reflectivity of chlorophyll and make the leaves glow white. The red filter lets through the IR, blocks nearly 90% of the visible, and the effect is obtained.

It is not often that a world full of small scale chaos yields a simple three tone picture; black, white, grey.
Thanks for the technical explanation! It's so helpful! I plan to try it myself.

Asher
 
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