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Shooting in full manual mode today for the first time ever

Jim Olson

Active member
I saw this little hummingbird in our holly bush and had to get my camera and shoot in Manual mode.
I have been wanting to try Manual mode, but just don't think I was ready until today.

I also wanted to edit the RAW image with a editing program that I have been wanting to use. I use Linux OS and the program is RawTherpee.


IMG_7464 edit crop_resized.jpg
 

Jim Olson

Active member
I have never shot in manual mode before. Always used P & sometimes AV & TV settings. I'm trying to get more control over my shots. You guys keep saying to brighten up my images so I'm trying... But it is hard to do. I'm so used to P (Program Mode).
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I have never shot in manual mode before. Always used P & sometimes AV & TV settings. I'm trying to get more control over my shots. You guys keep saying to brighten up my images so I'm trying... But it is hard to do. I'm so used to P (Program Mode).
Use 1 stop ISO less than you first choose! For clouds use a -1/3 stop to -1 stop so they don’t blow out!

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
I have never shot in manual mode before. Always used P & sometimes AV & TV settings. I'm trying to get more control over my shots. You guys keep saying to brighten up my images so I'm trying... But it is hard to do. I'm so used to P (Program Mode).
Good stuff and the histogram is your best friend...P is for "Professional" mode only !!
 
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That's so weird, I always shoot in Manual and never in the program modes. I have tried a few times as friends told me it was easier, but actually, I never really liked what I got, so prefer having control. Don't know what that says about me, hehe. :-D
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
That's so weird, I always shoot in Manual and never in the program modes. I have tried a few times as friends told me it was easier, but actually, I never really liked what I got, so prefer having control. Don't know what that says about me, hehe. :-D
It depends on the subject matter and the urgency of capturing scenes as they happen.
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Good stuff and the histogram is your best friend...P is for "Professional" mode only !!
I used that term for P mode when I was busy shooting weddings and family portraits and always used P.

It’s fun playing with the different modes, and in reality they are exactly the same. All provide full control. If the exposure is correct, all modes provide the exact same settings. I never use Manual, but have full control over my exposures -whether Aperture priority, Shutter priority, or Program mode —- I am constantly using the Exposure Compensation or Program Shift dials, to nail exposures.

With digital cameras, there is absolutely no excuse for poor exposures, or the need to have a bunch of head knowledge based on experience, as was the case when shooting film and had to wait until the prints came back to know how you did. There is a wonderful screen on the back of every camera. After taking a pic, the screen will tell you if you need to brighten or darken the picture, so you make the exposure adjustment and shoot again. I don’t bother with the Histogram.

The exception where I will use Manual, is if I am doing studio work with flash. For everything else it is too slow for me.
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
I saw this little hummingbird in our holly bush and had to get my camera and shoot in Manual mode.
I have been wanting to try Manual mode, but just don't think I was ready until today.

I also wanted to edit the RAW image with a editing program that I have been wanting to use. I use Linux OS and the program is RawTherpee.


View attachment 6422
I presume you have an LCD screen on the back of your camera Jim? What did this photo look like on it, after you took the pic? If it looked too bright like this, then an adjustment should be made right then.

This looks to me, that the overexposure is more a result of your Flash setting. Cut back Flash (controlled by the aperture fStop) and allow more natural light to come through (controlled by shutter speed). That is how shooting with flash is controlled.
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
I used that term for P mode when I was busy shooting weddings and family portraits and always used P.

It’s fun playing with the different modes, and in reality they are exactly the same. All provide full control. If the exposure is correct, all modes provide the exact same settings. I never use Manual, but have full control over my exposures -whether Aperture priority, Shutter priority, or Program mode —- I am constantly using the Exposure Compensation or Program Shift dials, to nail exposures.

With digital cameras, there is absolutely no excuse for poor exposures, or the need to have a bunch of head knowledge based on experience, as was the case when shooting film and had to wait until the prints came back to know how you did. There is a wonderful screen on the back of every camera. After taking a pic, the screen will tell you if you need to brighten or darken the picture, so you make the exposure adjustment and shoot again. I don’t bother with the Histogram.

The exception where I will use Manual, is if I am doing studio work with flash. For everything else it is too slow for me.
My Nikon give me the ability to shoot in manual with auto ISO and lets me set my minimum shutter speed on the fly. I don't generally look at my pictures until I download them but expose to the right as much as possible .
 

Jim Olson

Active member
I've been so busy, I hadn't had any time to shoot, because we just bought a new house and moved in about a week ago. I hope to get back into taking lots more pictures soon. Lot of little things need to be done here first. Lots of honey-dos.
 
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