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Technical Question Super zoom cameras versus APS-C, MFT or what for Wildlife and Nature?

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
All visitors to THIS forum have been impressed by the superbly lit, perfectly exposed and tack sharp stunning pictures of Tony’s birds.

Biggest surprise is that he’s used a class of cameras most pros don’t give a second glance: the one lens super zoom usually based on the “One Inch” sensor.

So who has chosen this path and who has found the same magic with perhaps the superb Olympus and Panasonic MFT, where a 600 mm lens weigh less tyrant many full frame 50mm glass!

What about say the Canon 7D Mark II with full size zooms?


What do you use for nature shots and why?

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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
One question I have for Tony is the apparent lack of noise with a 1” sensor, even when under-exposing at the beginning and end of day when the light is less. More surprising is that you like to use fast speeds!

Do you simply correct for noise, or else, it’s just not discernible on the size of images posted here?

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Light gathering goes by area, so for that metric 4/3 is about 2x better than 1", but diffraction limit for resolution goes by distance and then 4/3 is only about 1.4 times better.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Light gathering goes by area, so for that metric 4/3 is about 2x better than 1", but diffraction limit for resolution goes by distance and then 4/3 is only about 1.4 times better.
Jérôme,

Good points!

But explain “diffraction limit going by distance”.

For birds, especially in trees and photographed near dawn or twilight, light gathering and shutter speed are the biggest concerns.

What’s so clear, is the 1” sensor, in Tony’s experienced hands, delivers amazingly high quality pictures.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I meant, the practical limit of resolution given by diffraction increases with the size of the sensor.

As to light gathering, Tony's pictures of birds appear to have been taken by fair light.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I meant, the practical limit of resolution given by diffraction increases with the size of the sensor.
Agreed!

As to light gathering, Tony's pictures of birds appear to have been taken by fair light.
But Tony repeatedly makes a point of highly angled light, so he always gets gets unilateral illumination!

So that is going to be far less! But of course that is relative.

I guess we need to look at the EXIF details.

Remarkably, one cannot easily fault the delivered results.

Asher
 
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