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The iPhone has wiped out the digital camera market (news)

Just saw this today, though it's been posted in various places over the last few days. I suppose this would apply mainly to non-professional photographers, though there might be some creep into the pro market:

"Whenever people want to make fun of a stodgy old corporation that couldn’t see the future, they love referencing the camera maker Kodak. But Kodak wasn’t the only old dog taken out by the digital camera revolution: All camera companies have now fallen to the iPhone. Last year, only 9m cameras were sold, down from 122m in 2010, per tech journalist (and Gigamon founder) Om Malik.

Meanwhile, Apple moved 200m+ iPhones in 2020
While there are countless other camera-enabled smartphones, the iPhone -- which has sold 1B+ units since launching in 2007 -- clearly leads the pack.

Here’s how Malik thinks digital cameras will shake out moving forward:

·Big players: At <10m units per year, the 4 big digital camera makers (Canon, Nikon, Fuji, Sony) will be fighting over scraps. Sony is best positioned to thrive, but not as a camera maker: It supplies camera sensors to everyone, including Apple.

·Niche players: Super high-end cameras (Leica, Hasselblad, Phase One) will maintain share with pros and super-hobbyists.
As for Kodak, the company was last in the news for potential insider trading when the Trump administration awarded it $765m to make COVID-related pharmaceuticals."
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Those companies selling medical optics and robotics need to supply digital recordings. They still use ordinary 35 mm DSLRs and now Mirrorless camera roll go with their very expensive offerings. However, it’s pretty easy at their whim to phase out cameras, given all the recording modules they already have.

Pentax, Leica and Zeiss are at the top plus companies that use other companies products by adapters.

They don’t need a huge Pro and Enthusiast loyal photographer following to make it worthwhile.

But in the next camera design revolution, the cellphone makers will use software advances that will allow them to migrate and even create markets we never imagined!

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Kodak acquired Ofoto a photo sharing site long before Facebook and Instagram existed. Instead of going the Instagram route they chose to use Ofoto to try and get people to print digital images. One of many blunders of waisted money along the way.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I think we already had a discussion on the subject of smartphones and photography: https://openphotographyforums.com/f...ntrol-the-menu-you-control-the-choices.21749/

Kodak acquired Ofoto a photo sharing site long before Facebook and Instagram existed. Instead of going the Instagram route they chose to use Ofoto to try and get people to print digital images. One of many blunders of wasted money along the way.
This is what all photography sites were trying to do at the time. It made sense, because people did not have portable color screens to show the pictures around. Interestingly, that strategy did not fail because people did not want to print their pictures, it failed because color printer manufacturers were perceived as a better alternative.
 
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James Lemon

Well-known member
I think we already had a discussion on the subject of smartphones and photography: https://openphotographyforums.com/f...ntrol-the-menu-you-control-the-choices.21749/



This is what all photography sites were trying to do at the time. It made sense, because people did not have portable color screens to show the pictures around. Interestingly, that strategy did not fail because people did not want to print their pictures, it failed because color printer manufacturers were perceived as a better alternative.
If they did not have portable color screens then where did they plan on people being able to find their printing services?
 
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