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Trek through some local woodlands

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
I took my camera body and a short macro lens along, looking for any signs of fungi growing around tree trunks. A selection of resulting processed pics


TURKEY TAIL FUNGUS/MUSHROOM (Trametes versicolor)


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Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Beautiful work, Robert and back-breaking I expect too, LOL!

Well worth the effort!

Are you good at identifying edible mushrooms?

Asher
Thank you. Yes backbreaking even more so with being so out of shape from lockdown and lack of exercise over the past 19 months since pandemic.

I have never taken an interest in identifying mushrooms - in fact this is the first time I have ever made an effort to photograph fungi and mushrooms. So I thought I’d see if I could identify these ones tonight, with the help of online research.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It’s surprising what’s edible!

In Europe, village kids, where there’s tradition, are taught to recognize and avoid toxic mushrooms and collect the edible ones.

Growing up in a city, most of us are too frightened to venture into the countryside to search for mushrooms. In a village, folk know where they will be!

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We have oak root fungus and occasionally we see the mushrooms. However, despite being told by the County lab they’re edible when cooked, I have not crossed that line!

Now we’ve cut the watering of our ficus trees, the fungus is still in the roots but the balance is now against formation of those mushrooms, so we missed out!
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
But your mushrooms are wonderful and exotic subjects and your lighting brings that out!

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What a rich planet we have!

if only we understood it better! Your pictures remind us we just need to open our eyes. Thanks so much for sharing.


Asher
 
All of these are wonderful, Robert! Love that line of small mushrooms like little umbrellas partially open. The top ones too, which are the hard ones with fabulous colors. Still a couple of weeks to take these type of photos, I imagine, although here we had our first frost overnight.
:) Maggie
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
All of these are wonderful, Robert! Love that line of small mushrooms like little umbrellas partially open. The top ones too, which are the hard ones with fabulous colors. Still a couple of weeks to take these type of photos, I imagine, although here we had our first frost overnight.
:) Maggie
So, Maggie, you might also have a known mushroom hideout!

That will be splendid. Also then, look out for lichen moss and disguised toads!

Asher
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Anne and I went for a walk along a river path in the 5 degree C coolness, this afternoon. Of course the time I don’t bring a proper camera with me - we come across all kinds of subject matter…

… including this cool fungus off the beaten path. While Anne was talking some pics, I pulled out my phone after seeing this interesting angle that really exaggerated the size of the fungus - but did give some perspective. As can be seen from the pic with Anne’s hand included, it was quite the size. We’re hoping to get back there some day to exploit some of the things we saw, with a little more serious a gear.



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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Imagine if you could say for sure these magnificent funds were edible!


Village kids and their school teachers from Europe might know!

We have lost that training!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
It’s surprising what’s edible!

In Europe, village kids, where there’s tradition, are taught to recognize and avoid toxic mushrooms and collect the edible ones.

Growing up in a city, most of us are too frightened to venture into the countryside to search for mushrooms. In a village, folk know where they will be!

We have oak root fungus and occasionally we see the mushrooms. However, despite being told by the County lab they’re edible when cooked, I have not crossed that line!

Now we’ve cut the watering of our ficus trees, the fungus is still in the roots but the balance is now against formation of those mushrooms, so we missed out!
Armillaria mellea is traditionally considered edible and I have eaten these mushrooms without adverse effects. But the situation is complex: there are apparently up to 7 sub-species which look identical, which may explain various reports as to the edibility of the mushrooms. Care should be taken to insure only young mushrooms are eaten, that the mushrooms are well cooked and people should be aware of the possibility of allergic reactions, possibly building up with time.

Armillaria mellea can grow in immense members, so it is tempting to use that ressource. The taste, however, is relatively coarse.
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Trying something new to get myself in a better position for shooting such things as this type of subject in the woodlands.

After trying to squat down or bend way down to get pictures in wooded areas last week - and realizing I just can’t do it anymore —- I decided to look for a small portable camping stool to take with me. There was a good selection of traditional fold up cloth and metal frame ones, but why they were quite portable, all were a fixed low height and most had a maximum weight capacity of 180 pounds (I’m 265 lbs).

I was confused when noticing a bunch of plastic tubes listed in with the other chairs, and initially just scrolled past. After realizing how these tubes worked, I got realizing this probably perfect for my needs - adjustable to any height with a twist and click, and even support up to almost 400 pounds. The seat came in yesterday, and works pretty slick.

Now to put it to the test in the great outdoors and see how the plastic locking mechanism holds up.



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Robert Watcher

Well-known member
I finally got to try out my new collapsing tube stool, in the field this evening. It was wonderful - easy to carry - easy to set at a perfect height for shooting near the woodlands floor - easy to sit on and pivot on for different perspectives - held up to my heavy frame.




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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The great asset here is the collapsable stool. It really facilitates exploration.

I had seen them online, now I have the best recommendation.

The mushroom/toadstool knowledge base, went by me studying biology needed for medical school.



It would be great to be able to benefit from nature’s abundance, but I’m sure the store varieties will be softer and as Jérôme warns us, less fibrous.

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But I love these textures!

Asher
 
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