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Cem_Usakligil

Well-known member
James the first one is quite perfect. The only nit I've to pick is that the subject fills the frame vertically from head down to her cigarette. Whereas the framing is landscape. I wonder how it would look like if it had been vertical instead.

There is lots to look at here for those of us who like paying attention to small details. One can assume the role of Sherlock Holmes and have a field day.

The second one is taken half a second too early imo. I'd love to see her elbow and bag in the frame. The black area along the right edge blocks her stare out into the distance. Her face and the reflections in her glasses are quite nice.
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
James the first one is quite perfect. The only nit I've to pick is that the subject fills the frame vertically from head down to her cigarette. Whereas the framing is landscape. I wonder how it would look like if it had been vertical instead.

There is lots to look at here for those of us who like paying attention to small details. One can assume the role of Sherlock Holmes and have a field day.

The second one is taken half a second too early imo. I'd love to see her elbow and bag in the frame. The black area along the right edge blocks her stare out into the distance. Her face and the reflections in her glasses are quite nice.
Thank you for your comments Cem. I shall try framing more images in the portrait mode.I will look at the second one and maybe crop the right edge, thank you for pointing that out.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief


James,

I do like the thrusting sense of both women going on their "mission". They both seemed to be focused on the next stop they have to reach right now. They are not involved at all in what they're passing through. There might be gold strewn to one side of them and they's miss it!

Having said that, the edges and entries of the people matter most when choosing from amongst all such shots and building a collection. Then, some of the oddities might in fact help with the transitions and ordering one, to another. Also, you may then choose to crop away some edge or other.

I'd not do this now. Trust in what you've done and try to improve. In street photography, despite the limits in time and your choices of position, what you do frame might well represent some unique values you are reaching for. So allow what comes from this to be seen for now.

Cem's points are a great guide, especially as to timing. (One traffic light change and I'd have missed out on meeting my wife! :) In sports, dance, a kiss, sunsets and here in street photography, catching the moment of peak action in the drame can make the picture come alive.

Portrait framing is often the best choice. However, in this picture by Cem, that would have taken away much of the special strength of the couple's romantic abandon!

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
James,

I do like the thrusting sense of both women going on their "mission". They both seemed to be focused on the next stop they have to reach right now. They are not involved at all in what they're passing through. There might be gold strewn to one side of them and they's miss it!

Having said that, the edges and entries of the people matter most when choosing from amongst all such shots and building a collection. Then, some of the oddities might in fact help with the transitions and ordering one, to another. Also, you may then choose to crop away some edge or other.

I'd not do this now. Trust in what you've done and try to improve. In street photography, despite the limits in time and your choices of position, what you do frame might well represent some unique values you are reaching for. So allow what comes from this to be seen for now.

Cem's points are a great guide, especially as to timing. (One traffic light change and I'd have missed out on meeting my wife! :) In sports, dance, a kiss, sunsets and here in street photography, catching the moment of peak action in the drame can make the picture come alive.

Portrait framing is often the best choice. However, in this picture by Cem, that would have taken away much of the special strength of the couple's romantic abandon!

Asher
Thank you Asher ! Yes you and Cem make some very good points. I wonder about the 3.2 aspec ratio compared to a 4.3 I would like to know what others think of this in regards to a portrait frame.

Cropped without the tree.

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Guess what, Jim? Could be that with a series that tree you cropped might help in the transition to the next picture. So I wouldn't bother much about cropping at this stage. That's something I feel is advanced and best left to the final selected best dozen of your series. Then crop in a way that is fitting for your total presentation.

Right now, just keep the juices flowing and get more pictures, from which you contiuously choose your best 12 or so. Right now, this is still early times and if you have that same creative spirit, just go for it!

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Guess what, Jim? Could be that with a series that tree you cropped might help in the transition to the next picture. So I wouldn't bother much about cropping at this stage. That's something I feel is advanced and best left to the final selected best dozen of your series. Then crop in a way that is fitting for your total presentation.

Right now, just keep the juices flowing and get more pictures, from which you contiuously choose your best 12 or so. Right now, this is still early times and if you have that same creative spirit, just go for it!

Asher
Thank you for your input Asher. I will keep building and add some more .
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Boost for excellent seemingly independant women! Bravo James!
Strange I was just thinking about that first picture yesterday. These are obvious hip shots created with the 50mm Summilux but wide open at f/1.4 attached to the Leica Monochrome. I love this type of challenge taking pictures while walking! Although I love the 50mm I am more comfortable with a wider view, I like the sloppiness of a wider view but these are taken on an oblique angle not as dynamic as head on pictures. However head on pictures of this nature require different techniques, Garry Winogrand was a master at the technique with his 28mm.

You can find more independent women that I have taken pictures of below, both in color and b&w !

https://openphotographyforums.com/forums/media/users/james-lemon.11048/
 
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