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  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

What the Xti means for a 1D series photographer.

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
There is good news for the flagship cameras.

It can be seen in the enhancements of the new Eos Rebel XTi.

A. Expect soon: The dust reduction system will most likely find its way to the next 1Ds Mark X

B. Immediate Benefits to us: For one's travels or a spare, this little XTi seems to be a dream!


You have your 1D cameras but need back up. Consider this, for the XTi, with lenses f2.8 and wider, central focus point is now very accurate. Autofocus 9 point system (of the 30D) is fast! Nothing extra for a 1D owner, but it means that with a 70-200 2.8 IS, 35 1.4L or a 50 1.4, one can have a 10MP rapidly focusing extra camera with integral flash, for a wedding reception or social event for just $799! We've already own the lenses, so this is a no brainer.

So I may get an XTi in the bag and "Bob's your uncle!".

Asher
 
Last edited:
Asher,
I agree, this little baby will make a nice spare :)
However, there are also few things to consider:
* it takes different batteries
* it takes different grip
So $799 will quickly turn into $999...
Oh, a beautiful world of dSLRs :)))
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Forget the grip! Get it out of your head! No grip. Say that 100 times. :)

Now the battery?The NB2LH batteries are small and inexpensive and 2 extras and you can shoot as much as you want all day.

The idea of this is to have an extra rapidly focussing 10MP camera that is only 500gm!

Asher
 
OK, got me convinced!

Asher Kelman said:
Forget the grip! Get it out of your head! No grip. Say that 100 times. :)

Now the battery?The NB2LH batteries are small and inexpensive and 2 extras and you can shoot as much as you want all day.

The idea of this is to have an extra rapidly focussing 10MP camera that is only 500gm!

Asher
I think know now what I want for Xmas:)
 

Sid Jervis

pro member
Unless Canon announce something very special in the 30D arena (before the XTi ships), buying an XTi is just so easy to justify, err, I mean, purchase.

A backup camera = yes.
50+mb image files, the stock libraries will be filling up faster than you can say "cheese".

$799 US, that converts £423 in the UK (NOT), my guess is £699 UKP.

But what do I know.
 

Sid Jervis

pro member
Asher Kelman said:
Are you saying 700 pounds sterling, without VAT?

Maybe I should send some over for resale!

asher
That is my estimate but including VAT (£600 without), but pricing is likely to hit the dealers today.
I would say that in the past it used to be $1 = £1.
Canon seem to have that under control.

Of course the prices will drop.

At present the 350D (Rebel XT) is £429 discounted street price http://www.warehouseexpress.com/
I think retail list is about 30% above that (I can't find a value here)
 

dhphoto

New member
Asher Kelman said:
Forget the grip! Get it out of your head! No grip. Say that 100 times. :)

Now the battery?The NB2LH batteries are small and inexpensive and 2 extras and you can shoot as much as you want all day.

The idea of this is to have an extra rapidly focussing 10MP camera that is only 500gm!

Asher
What's wrong with the grip?

I have the Opteka on my 350D all the time - makes it a nice small package that is the same weight as the 20D alone

David
 

Dave New

Member
Partial to grip -- it anchors the handstrap

I'm partial to the battery grips on the semi-pro and amateur series of Canons. It provides an anchor for the handstrap, which I'm addicted to.

With the handstrap, I have a secure one-handed grip on the camera, and can carry it at the ready, without fear of dropping it, even if I open my hand in surprise.

It's a wonderful item, and I wouldn't carry an SLR without one, for action/street photography. Too bad, though, the grip is so large on some of the cameras (the 20D, in particular, because it accommodates an AA battery tray). I call it 'bigfoot', because it looms like a mushroom on the bottom of the camera.
 

Erik DeBill

New member
Dave New said:
Too bad, though, the grip is so large on some of the cameras (the 20D, in particular, because it accommodates an AA battery tray). I call it 'bigfoot', because it looms like a mushroom on the bottom of the camera.
And here I sometimes wish the standard grip on the 20D was a little larger. It's just small enough that I'll cramp a little holding it for long periods.

I'd assume the add-on grip for the 20D is the same size as the one for the 300D, which was a very nice size for my hands.

Too bad they can't make interchangeable grip-covers like they do for pistols.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
One wouldn't put a huge grip on a digicam. Why make it a rule for the XTi? This camera is convenient because it is so light. With a cap replacing the lens, this could be a great insurance on any professional assignment.

If I want a grip, I'll take a 1DsII or a 1DII.

For myself at least, this is a stand-in camera IMHO, for the 1D series user, (but the most capable one for the money) for going light on a hike, vacation or just relaxing. In each case, who wants the extra weight?

Now if this is your main camera, sure, a grip is great, especially to counterbalance large lenses.

However, with the 24-105mm or 70-200 4.0L IS or not, I think the balance might be just fine.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Andrew Rodney said:
Kind of feel sorry for the guy who just purchased my used Rebel XT. But with the lens, he still got a good deal.

There's a bit of info about the new Rebel here:

http://www.macworld.com/news/2006/08/24/rebel/index.php
If you feel sorry for those who just bought the 30D, how about the people who just bought the dual G5 Mac Towers, only to see the Intel Machines over-Tower them!

Wait, there's more!

How will the new 1DsII or III buyers feel when the new 1DsX comes out with RGB for each pixel, loco-regional iso-adjustment, 14 BIT and a button on the top for mirror lockup for $7,400?

I know I'd feel pretty good! But that's just me. Meanwhile, the XTi seems an amazing bargain which all photographers (with Canon lenses) need to buy for their wife.

Asher
 
Grip

Asher Kelman said:
One wouldn't put a huge grip on a digicam. Why make it a rule for the XTi? This camera is convenient because it is so light. With a cap replacing the lens, this could be a great insurance on any professional assignment.
Well, I would..:)

In fact, I had it on my 20D and I have it on my 30D now. It balances better, and it's a huge help for portrait shots.

I can imagine it could be uncomfortable for a petite female or otherwise a person with a small-sized palm, but for a 6'2" 200lb red-meat-eating red-wine-(and lots of other stuff)-drinking male it is exactly what the good doctor ordered..:)

It took it off once, for a what we thought would be a strenuous hike (Delicate Arch, Arches NP, Moab, UT) - which turned to be just a nice walk - and the camera felt so tiny and flimsy that I put it back the next second we returned and I can hardly think of any reason that would make me ever take it off again.

I'm not even talking about battery life with that thing, it plain seems to last forever...

Asher Kelman said:
... If I want a grip, I'll take a 1DsII or a 1DII....
Earth to Asher!:)

You're kidding, right?

We're talking about $150 add-on, not a $6,700 body upgrade..
Well, maybe in your league it's a lunch money, but in mine it's something I would have to save for a long (I mean long) time...

All IMHO :)
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Nik!!

I was referring to use of the XTi for 1D series users!

I'm assuming that one does indeed have such a camera, or else, the comment does not apply.

Asher
 

Diane Fields

New member
Dave New said:
I'm partial to the battery grips on the semi-pro and amateur series of Canons. It provides an anchor for the handstrap, which I'm addicted to.

With the handstrap, I have a secure one-handed grip on the camera, and can carry it at the ready, without fear of dropping it, even if I open my hand in surprise.

It's a wonderful item, and I wouldn't carry an SLR without one, for action/street photography. Too bad, though, the grip is so large on some of the cameras (the 20D, in particular, because it accommodates an AA battery tray). I call it 'bigfoot', because it looms like a mushroom on the bottom of the camera.
Dave, I used a grip on all my bodies for years. When I bought the 20D I ordered the grip right along with it--but it was one of the ones with problems. It went back and I shot with the 20D without long enough to find I really liked the lesser weight--but no handstrap, which I preferred. I tried one of the ones that screws into the tripod hole, but didn't care for it. Then--since I also use the AS system, I tried a Camdaptor and wrist strap. That's a nice compromise. However, since I like an L bracket too at times, I found myself always carrying an Allen wrench and changing the Camdaptor and L bracket occasionally. This Spring RRS added an L bracket with a lug for the wrist strap (for the 5D--its available for several Nikons too, not sure of other Canon bodies) and that's the perfect answer for me--the L bracket with wrist strap, no grip. I would recommend either the Camdaptor or RRS's brackets if you don't want to use a grip and prefer the wrist strap.

Diane
 

Tim Armes

New member
Diane Fields said:
Dave, I used a grip on all my bodies for years. When I bought the 20D I ordered the grip right along with it--but it was one of the ones with problems. It went back and I shot with the 20D without long enough to find I really liked the lesser weight--but no handstrap, which I preferred. I tried one of the ones that screws into the tripod hole, but didn't care for it. Then--since I also use the AS system, I tried a Camdaptor and wrist strap. That's a nice compromise. However, since I like an L bracket too at times, I found myself always carrying an Allen wrench and changing the Camdaptor and L bracket occasionally. This Spring RRS added an L bracket with a lug for the wrist strap (for the 5D--its available for several Nikons too, not sure of other Canon bodies) and that's the perfect answer for me--the L bracket with wrist strap, no grip. I would recommend either the Camdaptor or RRS's brackets if you don't want to use a grip and prefer the wrist strap.

Diane
Hi,

Many of the Kirk and Markins brackets also have this lug.

Tim
 

Ben Rubinstein

pro member
There is a problem though and I consider it a major issue for 1 series or a 5D shooter in using this camera as backup. The lenses. I shoot weddings/events with a 24-70L lens and it is my most used set of focal lengths, it has WA, normal and mild telephoto all in package. Fine.

Now my 5D has broken down mid wedding and I need to switch to backup. Oh oh. Yes I have a 17-40L on my belt that will do in a pinch. But what about those shots I had put the 17-40L on my belt for in the first place? What about the 24-40mm f2.8 shots in dim light that I do?

So I need a 10-22mm at minimum to go with the camera. The price is starting to rise....

I'm very naughty for it as I prey fervently every job that I won't have to go backup body, but my backup is a....well it's FF....film body. Yes it would kill my profit margin for that job and I would loose huge amounts of control that I'm used to in that I don't own a high tech scanner or have the knowledge to use one at a high level. BUT the lenses I'm using will work exactly the same without any worry.

I do think of getting this body for backup, I would get another 10D (are they giving 2nd hand ones away free yet?), but I loose ETTL II and no longer shoot with the Metz's I used when the 10D was my money camera. So this camera might work for me with the 17-40L at a pinch.
 

Don Lashier

New member
Ben Rubinstein said:
Now my 5D has broken down mid wedding and I need to switch to backup. Oh oh. Yes I have a 17-40L on my belt that will do in a pinch. But what about those shots I had put the 17-40L on my belt for in the first place? What about the 24-40mm f2.8 shots in dim light that I do?
Valid concerns, but frankly, how often has your 5D broken down mid wedding? A 1.6 backup is not ideal but on the rare occasion of a failure at least you can keep shooting and make do.

- DL
 

Dave New

Member
I guess the question is "When is a backup not a backup?"

For some, that answer is "If it makes you markedly change what you are doing, in terms of lens usage, framing, etc., then it's not a backup."

That's why I find it peculiar that folks that shoot with a full-frame 1Ds-style camera would consider anything but a 5D (or other full-frame solution) as a backup.

And, if your main camera is a 5D, I guess you are stuck for a 5D as a backup for the moment (maybe this is how you can justify buying a 1Ds?)

Since my main camera is a 20D, it certainly leaves me with a lot more inexpensive choices for a backup, if I so desire or feel the need. On the other hand, the reason I upgraded to a 20D from a Digital Rebel is because the infantile way Canon hard-wired most everything (and crippled/disabled everything else) on that camera drove me to distraction. I understand that the Digital Rebel Xt and Xti have marginally improved in that area, so maybe an Xti might serve as a suitable backup for another 1.6x crop factor camera.
 

Diane Fields

New member
Dave New said:
I guess the question is "When is a backup not a backup?"

For some, that answer is "If it makes you markedly change what you are doing, in terms of lens usage, framing, etc., then it's not a backup."

That's why I find it peculiar that folks that shoot with a full-frame 1Ds-style camera would consider anything but a 5D (or other full-frame solution) as a backup.

And, if your main camera is a 5D, I guess you are stuck for a 5D as a backup for the moment (maybe this is how you can justify buying a 1Ds?)

.
Well, for me----I shoot with a 5D, but my 1.6x body is a backup only for my parttime commercial work. Its the security I need for that--and will work fine for my never larger than 8.5 x 11 full bleed prints/CDs for reps. I shot the same with a D60 with D30 as backup, 10D with D60 as backup, 20D with 10D as backup LOL. Therefore I know that it will 'suffice'. Now--for my personal work I don't really consider I have a backup, though I will carry the 10D with me as second body (having sold the 20D to have more to apply to the purchase of the 5D--along with selling some redundant lenses, the old D30 and D60 also). I really can't afford 2/5Ds--so if it has problems. then I'll send it off--and photograph with the 10D--for which I do have similar FOV lenses. It won't be the same--but how many of us can truly justify 2 $2800 bodies--certainly not me. Having any camera body that will work with my lenses is better than no camera at all under certain curciumstances. No one said I would have to be happy about it *smile*.

Diane
 

ChrisDauer

New member
Dave New said:
I guess the question is "When is a backup not a backup?"
For some, that answer is "If it makes you markedly change what you are doing, in terms of lens usage, framing, etc., then it's not a backup."
That's why I find it peculiar that folks that shoot with a full-frame 1Ds-style camera would consider anything but a 5D (or other full-frame solution) as a backup.
And, if your main camera is a 5D, I guess you are stuck for a 5D as a backup for the moment (maybe this is how you can justify buying a 1Ds?)
Well, for some folks, their income may be split between Wedding (FF) and Wildlife (1.6x). In this case, the "back-up" is simply the "less-desireable" body; which alternates, given the type of shoot. I know a few photographers in this situation and there back-up is simply any camera that they have on hand to continue working.

After all, that's really all a back-up is. Because now you are "back up" and running. :)
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Guys,

Reality: if one had used digital rebels (i'd want 2) one could finish most jobs. Even a D30! That is a wonderful portrait camera and a great bargain.

Also if one has film, take that with too. One should probably have two backup cameras anyway.

What is more beautiful for a wedding than Portra?

The barrier is not the camera but technique and art. There are brilliant people to do processing for you.

However, if the camera does not work, everything stops. Besides, sometimes one can give one camera to someone responsible to take extra pictures during a reception if you cant get an assistant.

Just a thought.

Asher
 

Nill Toulme

New member
Personally I'm pretty excited about the 400D. I generally shoot with two 1D Mark II's and a plethora of L lenses, but my walkaround/fishing/hiking camera is a 20D with 17-85 IS and 70-300 IS (as distinguished from my "pocket" camera, a Canon S400). But even the 20D/17-85 is pretty bulky, and my major complaint about it is that the 20D's shutter sounds like a firecracker going off in a quiet setting.

I'm sorely tempted to trade that rig in on the smaller, quieter 400D with the new Sigma 18-200 OS (OS is Sigma's version of IS). I had the non-stabilized version of that lens and liked it extremely well as a P&S-type knockaround, and only let it go because of the lack of IS.

I think the 400D with 18-200 OS would probably constitute the current pinnacle of compact, extended-zoom P&S utility and perfomance.

Nill
~~
www.toulme.net
 
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