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Dwarf tulip multispectral

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
Quadriptych of a dwarf tulip in human vision, UV, and simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):



This dwarf tulip has an unusual pattern, its center is not UV bright, the inside petals reflect UV somewhat, but the bottom of the petals only in simulated bee and butterfly vision show an otherwise invisble pattern and all this gets quite nicely visible.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I think in this set, the bee vision might edge out what we see!

This is a great color combo for current fashion!

Asher
 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
First time ever I had the case where the insects see more than we in the visible (not UV) part!!
Klaus,

I feel so good for really having spent time on these pictures and I am so proud of myself for observing something not only pretty but also unique!

Perhaps it comes from my years of examining the colors of bumps, lumps and rashes on skin, where a change in pattern, hue or speckle could mean discovery of a melanoma or skin cancer at a curable stage.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Quadriptych of a dwarf tulip in human vision, UV, and simulated butterfly and bee vision (left to right, top to bottom):



This dwarf tulip has an unusual pattern, its center is not UV bright, the inside petals reflect UV somewhat, but the bottom of the petals only in simulated bee and butterfly vision show an otherwise invisble pattern and all this gets quite nicely visible.
Klaus,

This set of pictures reminds me of school prayers in High School in London. Each day there was a reading from the Bible which ended with the words,

”Here endeth the lesson!”

Your pictures are such a lesson.

But what could it mean today?

I think of two possibilities:

First, for flowers, (excluding those cultivars bees by our culture for their new colors with beauty to the human eye), there should be some survival and natural selection benefit for the kinds of displays that plants make around their organs of reproduction.

Secondly, another idea: When we see the vision of the insects, it can stand as a metaphor for better understanding others. If we could see ourselves from their point of view, what would they observe and feel?
 

Dr Klaus Schmitt

Active member
Klaus,

I feel so good for really having spent time on these pictures and I am so proud of myself for observing something not only pretty but also unique!

Perhaps it comes from my years of examining the colors of bumps, lumps and rashes on skin, where a change in pattern, hue or speckle could mean discovery of a melanoma or skin cancer at a curable stage.

Asher
That's quite some ability, especially in this fast paced time, where hardly anybody has time anymore!! Great that you have preserved that!!
 
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