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700 Series Shinkansen

cruising into the station at about 40mph.

Nikon NIKON D7200
Lens- Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary
ISO- 100
Focal Length- 70.0 mm (105.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperture- f/6.3
Exposure Time- 0.004s (1/250)

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
cruising into the station at about 40mph.




NIKON D7200
Lens- Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary
ISO- 100
Focal Length- 70.0 mm (105.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperture- f/6.3
Exposure Time- 0.004s (1/250)​


Steven,

That is a great sight! What has happened to US train manufacturing? One of the fabrication plants I have worked in made the cabins for Siemens high speed trains. Good to think that at least some Americans can get jobs as we get faster ?s!

Asher
 
in Japan the travel infrastructure is primarily rail to move the mass quantities of people around.
they, for the most part have standardized their rail cars with interior variations in class and distance to travel and area localization (color scheme).

this image is of a standard class car on a Shinkansen.

Nikon NIKON D7200
Lens- Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary
ISO- 900
Focal Length- 17.0 mm (25.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperture- f/6.3
Exposure Time- 0.008s (1/125)

 
Japan also does not retire equipment w/o reason. they maintain their livery to a very high standard.





on this image check out the students in the center of the shot and the reflection of their sneakers on the floor.
 
Last edited:

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Steven,

So it seems that your original picture wasn't actually, as I first assumed, a fabulous Japanese bullet train in the USA! But now I realize that the Japanese seem to run their society, at least in their train system, with military efficiency. Re riots start with throwing away all clothes, standards of hygiene, obeying orders, skills to disassemble clean and reassemble their rifle in the dark, until they can be positioned and connected as sonecwell fitting "cog" in a giant society.

Your photographs, (and the words accompanying them, are so helpful in getting beyond the engaging beauty of form that the trains display.

Thanks for sharing!

Asher.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
cruising into the station at about 40mph.

Nikon NIKON D7200
Lens- Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary
ISO- 100
Focal Length- 70.0 mm (105.0 mm in 35mm)
Aperture- f/6.3
Exposure Time- 0.004s (1/250)

Steven,

I had to revisit this glistening train!

I have been thinking a lot about this since I have studied the manufacturecof Siemens trains front cabin in Los Angeles. As modern as the train is, the front is made up of a collection of separate panels.

The Japanese form seems to be molded in one piece. I guess it’s carbon fiber or fiberglass. The curved screen is sovperfectly fabulous too. I wonder whether there are structural compromises or perhaps they have a structural crumple zone to help protect the engineer driving the train?

I am so in love with the beautiful and perfectly fabricated shape!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Steven,

I did some research. This design was inspired from nature: the Kingfisher’s bill slices into water almost without a sound!

“ Whenever a train sped into a tunnel, it generated atmospheric pressure waves that reached the tunnel exit at the speed of sound. Like a piston in a cylinder, the train was forcing the fluid air out of the other end of the tunnel. The air exited in low-frequency waves (under 20Hz) that produced a large boom and aerodynamic vibrations.

This problem was particularly troublesome because it was tied to both the geometry of the tunnel and the speed of the train. The micro pressure of the wave was in proportion to the ratio of the cross-section of the trainset to that of the tunnel. Moreover, every unit increase in speed was producing an increase in pressure to the power of three.

The design team would have to find a way to redesign the shape of the train to go faster without creating the boom. The key was in preventing the pressure wave buildup by reducing the cross-sectional area of the train and redesigning its nose.

A discussion with a junior engineer prompted Nakatsu to once again search for the answer in nature. The young engineer observed that the test train seemed to “shrink” when it was traveling through the tunnel. Nakatsu reasoned that it must be due to a sudden change in air resistance, from open sky to closed tunnel, and wondered if there was an organism that was adapted to such conditions.

From his birdwatching experiences, Makatsu remembered the kingfisher, a bird that dives at high speed from one fluid (air) to another that is 800 times denser (water) with barely a splash. He surmised the shape of its bill was what allowed the bird to cut so cleanly into the water.”

Read the entire story here

Now isn’t that amazing!

Asher
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
This beautiful image of a train seems to exemplify the outstanding technological and cultural advances of that society while at the same time reminding one of the form of a whale, a fellow species that society chooses to destroy.
 
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