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Travelog: A closer look at Machu Picchu..

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
So, my best guess is that there is more

Although there is already a lot of information in the scene.

I have never used supplemental oxygen but I admit I was short of breath in the silver mines in Tonapah, Nevadah, 10 years ago at just 6,000 ft!

At the extra 2,000 ft + height in Macchu Picchu, I would be for sure needing a personal oxygen generator!

Asher
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
That is a lovely and typical image of Machu Pichu but be forwarned. It is not always sunny, providing great photo opportunities. It can be quite socked in with fog as it was the time I visited. My suggestion to visitors is schedule yourself so you can spend extra days if need be in Aguas Calientes at the base of the mountain in case of foggy conditions. If photography is not a high priority then don]t worry about the weather. If you have time to spare walk along the railroad tracks out of Aguas Calientes to see some spectacular native orchids.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Ahah, Peter!

More good information! So how are tourists catered for? Does everyone climb up by foot or are there cable cars or vehicles?

Did you photograph the native orchids?

....and llama perhaps?

...and are there regular farmers working the ancient terraced levels for crops?

Asher
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Asher, Peter, James...thanks for looking in.
Yes, we were lucky with the weather, most days anyway.

It was not only the archeology site that interested us. The people. The markets. The locals. That was as fascinating, maybe more so, than the site itself ( for me at least ).
For Ayesha, the higher the climb, the better. For me, any place to rest..the better.



I will take this moment any time over looking at stones!
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Thanks Robert.

Some climbed a certain distance...some found the best way to ascend; while others took it easy dividing the climbing over a period!!


Now, think of those that built it!! It is nice to reflect sitting alone away from the crowds, of the effort, the cost ( in lives and money ) such a construction would have entailed.
Go back centuries. Close your eyes. Just imagine!
 

Antonio Correia

Well-known member
Asher, Peter, James...thanks for looking in.
Yes, we were lucky with the weather, most days anyway.

It was not only the archeology site that interested us. The people. The markets. The locals. That was as fascinating, maybe more so, than the site itself ( for me at least ).
For Ayesha, the higher the climb, the better. For me, any place to rest..the better.



I will take this moment any time over looking at stones!
Great shot Fahim ! :)
Beautiful place indeed... it looks like it is a bit cold, at least for the inhabitants.
Amazing colours of these tissues and bags.
I am sure you do have more. Will you show us, please ?
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Thanks Robert.

Some climbed a certain distance...some found the best way to ascend; while others took it easy dividing the climbing over a period!!


Now, think of those that built it!! It is nice to reflect sitting alone away from the crowds, of the effort, the cost ( in lives and money ) such a construction would have entailed.
Go back centuries. Close your eyes. Just imagine!
This is magnificent, but just for the Emperor and only used for 80 years!

Amazing what one can do with slaves!

But what replaced them was perhaps far worse.

Apparently, most of what folk now see is rebuilt as a national monument. I would hope I could visit one day!

Asher
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
You did indeed have excellent weather for your photos, beautifull! What is so striking about the Andes mountains is their steepness.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
You did indeed have excellent weather for your photos, beautifull! What is so striking about the Andes mountains is their steepness.
That reply, Peter was on my birthday!

The picture here is the closest I might get to this incredible world pilgrimage sight!


1157


@ Fahim: I wonder how the natural looking stone structure on the right foreground got to be hollowed so?

Asher
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
Well a belated Happy Birthday Asher. I read just today that the whole complex was built as a summer home for the Inca king Pachacuti and his extended family.
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
I don't remember seeng it during my visit. A sad bit of current news: a new international airport is under construction in the valley between the city of Cusco and Machu Picchu. The project will destroy Inca archeological sites in the valley including a canal system as well as causing vast environmental damage but the president is insistent that it go forward.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I don't remember seeng it during my visit. A sad bit of current news: a new international airport is under construction in the valley between the city of Cusco and Machu Picchu. The project will destroy Inca archeological sites in the valley including a canal system as well as causing vast environmental damage but the president is insistent that it go forward.
Peter,

Indigenous people respect the land usually

Looks like Trump has a brother and a kindred spirit!

Asher
 
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