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NSFW Bamboo!

Tom dinning

Registrant*
I can see the pixels from here (among other things).

I listened to a woman from Darwin talking on her photographs which were quite evocative in the sense they demanded a great deal of ethical interpretation.
She said she took and processed photos by a rather instinctive process. She composed and processed in an impromptu manner and reacted to how she feels about the image in front of her.
She knew she was on the right track when she felt good about what pat she was doing.
I related to this very much.
My question is: did you feel the same way when taking and processing this shot?
The reason I ask is not because of the pixels or the subject matter but the content and context relationships, the manner of the model, the rather mundane approach to compositional elements, the absence of mood, the limits of framing and the rather scared look on her face.

otherwise, it’s a fine image?
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
The reason I ask is not because of the pixels or the subject matter but the content and context relationships, the manner of the model, the rather mundane approach to compositional elements, the absence of mood, the limits of framing and the rather scared look on her face.
I was hesitant to ask a similar question.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I know Kate ver
I was hesitant to ask a similar question.
Well, Jerome,

You are just well mannered and kind! Likely cultural.

Kate is s very special and adorable person who is always happy and well posed. Here she wasn’t at all ready and just getting to a position she planned for the camera. So I took an extra picture.

It means a lot to me, but now I guess it’s merely personal as my memento not meaning as much to others to make up for its shortcomings.

I once asked what was underneath her usual sparkling face and then she broke down sobbing. That story, she then told, has haunted me. So perhaps it’s that awkwardness I cling to here.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
None of what Tom and I wrote was intended to criticise Kate in any way.

If she is a special and adorable person, if she broke down sobbing when asked a personal question, then it is your responsibility as a photographer to bring that out in your pictures. You know the story, it haunts you. For you to tell that story will mean to go beyond the feelings that haunts you.

I said it here already: a picture is a story told without words. But the story still needs to be told.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
None of what Tom and I wrote was intended to criticise Kate in any way.

If she is a special and adorable person, if she broke down sobbing when asked a personal question, then it is your responsibility as a photographer to bring that out in your pictures. You know the story, it haunts you. For you to tell that story will mean to go beyond the feelings that haunts you.

I said it here already: a picture is a story told without words. But the story still needs to be told.
I would agree entirely, Jerome!

I don’t expect anyone else to have my feelings evoked. I had no such intent.

I still didn’t imagine it would otherwise fail to interest you.

I accept that!

Asher
 
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