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Black & white? Black & white!

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
OPFers who know me for long do know that color is my world and shooting B&W is not my cup of tea…
I even have refused in the past exhibition because I were asked to produce B&W only images…
Asher, in private message have often told me that I was stubborn (and not only about B&W!).

Well some time ago for a long lasting client, I were asked, after the shooting to prepare for a brochure some B&W portrait of models (male and female)…
Commercially, I could not refuse, I was so "angry" that I was surprising myself replying "OK, but that's gonna me MY B&W", my way to pp them…
He was so happy by the results… !

Here's one
Natural light, no reflectors, just her, sun and I (and the 645Z)

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
OPFers who know me for long do know that color is my world and shooting B&W is not my cup of tea…
I even have refused in the past exhibition because I were asked to produce B&W only images…
Asher, in private message have often told me that I was stubborn (and not only about B&W!).

Well some time ago for a long lasting client, I were asked, after the shooting to prepare for a brochure some B&W portrait of models (male and female)…
Commercially, I could not refuse, I was so "angry" that I was surprising myself replying "OK, but that's gonna me MY B&W", my way to pp them…
He was so happy by the results… !

Here's one
Natural light, no reflectors, just her, sun and I (and the 645Z)


You have three assets thaycwork together here: a superbly beautiful collaborator in the model, she's relaxed and fun, a natural. Then you use one of the very best camera with probably the best dynamic range. Thirdly you have tens of thousands of eyes polishing your judgement as what works I. A save.

Simply put: Bravo!

Just keep practicing re-mapping colors to grey scale ranges that show up your composition the best for you and your mission!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Thanks Asher, I will!

However:
You have three assets thaycwork together here: a superbly beautiful collaborator in the model, she's relaxed and fun, a natural. Then you use one of the very best camera with probably the best dynamic range. Thirdly you have tens of thousands of eyes polishing your judgement as what works I.
My mum gave me only a pair… so I must have missed something… Ah! I wish I could better understand English!
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I hope you will ski on this trail a little more!

If you can find such treasures, make it a regular habit! See how perfect shape and shading does not need color. We are able to imagine a complete living and delightful person without any color as we do this from shapes, shading and an ability to sort just based on our perception of 3 D monochrome form!

Color just adds shorthand clues for ripeness to eat or mate!

Asher
 

Wolfgang Plattner

Active member
Hi

I'm sorry, but for me there is too much brightness, somehow no "humanity" in this portrait.
The overall impression is "metallic", I can get no connection to the person.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Amazing, Wolfgang that we see things so differently. I did not get the same reactions from Nicolas' image. Yes it is very simplified!










Hi

I'm sorry, but for me there is too much brightness, somehow no "humanity" in this portrait.
The overall impression is "metallic", I can get no connection to the person.



That is so interesting. You are used to certain presentations and this doesn't do it

Perhaps I can fill in the blanks from being on the slopes longer!

Asher
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Hello Nicolas.

That the client liked the image is what matters in the commercial world.

On the other hand, I like the simplicity in this image. It has elegance.

But then again, I am a biased viewer. I like to expose far to the right! :)
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Hello Faim!
Good to hear from you!
AFAIK, you've been off for some time…
I hope you're doing well :)

Back to your comment, thanks! but even in commercial shots, I try to give my best, I want and need to be proud of my work…
There are no biased viewers, there are viewers!
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Hi

I'm sorry, but for me there is too much brightness, somehow no "humanity" in this portrait.
The overall impression is "metallic", I can get no connection to the person.
Wolfgang,
In a way, I like that you do not like, not because it's you but because 100% of kudos would be really too much!
It's just not possible that one image pleases everyone.
When it came to me the necessity to create in black and white, I did not want to imitate anyone, not Renoir, nor Ansel Adams, nor Robert Doineau nor Raymond Depardon or any other known photographer. Perhaps because I am not able of it, but more certainly because I wanted the image thus created to be a faithful reflection of my feelings, of the atmosphere that I wanted to convey.
What I wanted, was to go with the opposite of my color images, keeping very few details, contrasty but misty, very very soft. Like if I were dreaming, some ethereal atmosphere.

To please all is not my cup of tea, although I have an obligation to please my customers.

In reality, the fact you don’t like brings a great value to the positive comments.
Sorry you do not like, that’s life!
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
OPFers who know me for long do know that color is my world and shooting B&W is not my cup of tea…
I even have refused in the past exhibition because I were asked to produce B&W only images…
Asher, in private message have often told me that I was stubborn (and not only about B&W!).

Well some time ago for a long lasting client, I were asked, after the shooting to prepare for a brochure some B&W portrait of models (male and female)…
Commercially, I could not refuse, I was so "angry" that I was surprising myself replying "OK, but that's gonna me MY B&W", my way to pp them…
He was so happy by the results… !

Here's one
Natural light, no reflectors, just her, sun and I (and the 645Z)




I stand by my earlier opinion. I'm steadfast in my feeling that this is well done. It is not nearly well composed, it simply is! It is not nearly in focus, it is and it's also important to the success of the picture. The very dark blacks and the brightest whites are perfectly delivered without the greys that are not shown being actually "missing" as they are simply not used in this presentation and style.



The style still allows my brain to build he shape and character as a real person. It would be a sculpture but that would only then be in white marble. It is the opposites of extreme finely drawn that makes a unique statement.



Of course we have just had our appetites whetted.

I am not surprised it doesn't garnish 100% approval, but that is the value of our group here. We are honest.

If we don't like what we see, we have enough standing and credit with each other to smash so!

That, to me is as good an achievement as a statement of excellence!

We must have dissent or we are just in a mutual admiration society!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
It is the opposites of extreme finely drawn that makes a unique statement.

I am not surprised it doesn't garnish 100% approval, but that is the value of our group here. We are honest.

If we don't like what we see, we have enough standing and credit with each other to smash so!

That, to me is as good an achievement as a statement of excellence!

We must have dissent or we are just in a mutual admiration society!

Asher
Thank you Asher, you wrote with better words than mine my feelings here…
In a way, I like that you do not like, not because it's you but because 100% of kudos would be really too much!
It's just not possible that one image pleases everyone.
When it came to me the necessity to create in black and white, I did not want to imitate anyone, not Renoir, nor Ansel Adams, nor Robert Doineau nor Raymond Depardon or any other known photographer. Perhaps because I am not able of it, but more certainly because I wanted the image thus created to be a faithful reflection of my feelings, of the atmosphere that I wanted to convey.
What I wanted, was to go with the opposite of my color images, keeping very few details, contrasty but misty, very very soft. Like if I were dreaming, some ethereal atmosphere.

To please all is not my cup of tea, although I have an obligation to please my customers.

In reality, the fact you don’t like brings a great value to the positive comments.
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Nicolas,

OPFers who know me for long do know that color is my world and shooting B&W is not my cup of tea…
I even have refused in the past exhibition because I were asked to produce B&W only images…
And I support your intuition in that.

That is not at all to say that the B&W images you show in this thread are not very nice.

Still, perhaps a boxer should not of his own volition offer to fight with one hand tied behind his back.

Best regards,

Doug
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
There are at least four reasons to produce monochrome photographs:

• One's photographic chain can only do that. (Happened a lot in the 1920s!)

• The client's medium can only support that. (Many great works in newspapers and magazines, for example, from that consideration.)

• The monochrome image best delivers the artist's vision. (Many wonderful works produced, over the years, and today, for that reason.)

• It's a fad. (Which, thankfully, waxes and wanes.)

Best regards,

Doug
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
There are at least four reasons to produce monochrome photographs:

• One's photographic chain can only do that. (Happened a lot in the 1920s!)

• The client's medium can only support that. (Many great works in newspapers and magazines, for example, from that consideration.)

• The monochrome image best delivers the artist's vision. (Many wonderful works produced, over the years, and today, for that reason.)

• It's a fad. (Which, thankfully, waxes and wanes.)

Doug,

The Thematic spine of your options is that it is only in the exception that photography should be in monochrome!

That is a problem as it seems to define taste!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Hi, Nicolas,



And I support your intuition in that.

That is not at all to say that the B&W images you show in this thread are not very nice.

Still, perhaps a boxer should not of his own volition offer to fight with one hand tied behind his back.

Best regards,

Doug
Thank you Doug for your support :)
But sometimes one has to jump onto the "ring"…
Then one should feel it as a challenge, not as a punishment…
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Hi, Nicolas,



And I support your intuition in that.

That is not at all to say that the B&W images you show in this thread are not very nice.

Still, perhaps a boxer should not of his own volition offer to fight with one hand tied behind his back.

Best regards,

Doug
Thank you Doug for your support :)
But sometimes one has to jump onto the "ring"…
Then one should feel it as a challenge, not as a punishment…
These are unfortunate and mistaken statements with limited vision, insight and a dash of prejudice!

Make the picture as only you wish. There are no rules except it either might evoke the feelings you hope in others or not. All we can do is put it out there and hope.

Do not suggest to anyone to promote or discourage a particular style of expression! This is the opposite of having an artist's creatively open mind! Saying that color is the normally preferred mode is a serious mistake and very limiting. Such statements can disrupt creative instinct in others.

Just believe in your own intuition and create using greyscale and color to the extent relevant to your wishes at that moment in time. It's like suggestions as to whether or not to center a rose, but to place it in the interesection of the "positions of thirds". All such rules are narrow positions and limiting and merely sufficient for making art by committee!

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

These are unfortunate and mistaken statements with limited vision, insight and a dash of prejudice!

Make the picture as only you wish. There are no rules except it either might evoke the feelings you hope in others or not. All we can do is put it out there and hope.

Do not suggest to anyone to promote or discourage a particular style of expression!
I suggested no such thing. This seems to me to be a straw man. Methinks someone is overly sensitive. And please do not presume to tell me what to suggest.

Doug
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
These are unfortunate and mistaken statements with limited vision, insight and a dash of prejudice!

Make the picture as only you wish. There are no rules except it either might evoke the feelings you hope in others or not. All we can do is put it out there and hope.

Do not suggest to anyone to promote or discourage a particular style of expression! This is the opposite of having an artist's creatively open mind! Saying that color is the normally preferred mode is a serious mistake and very limiting. Such statements can disrupt creative instinct in others.

Just believe in your own intuition and create using greyscale and color to the extent relevant to your wishes at that moment in time. It's like suggestions as to whether or not to center a rose, but to place it in the interesection of the "positions of thirds". All such rules are narrow positions and limiting and merely sufficient for making art by committee!

Asher
Asher
Once again my English is not good enough to understand all subtleties, however I don't think that Doug did shout out to everyone to follow HIS statements…
AFAIK Doug did only wrote his own thoughts, that BTW I do agree with.
But this is for our own.

And yes
All such rules are narrow positions and limiting and merely sufficient for making art by committee!
is the best statement overall.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Asher
Once again my English is not good enough to understand all subtleties, however I don't think that Doug did shout out to everyone to follow HIS statements…
AFAIK Doug did only wrote his own thoughts, that BTW I do agree with.
But this is for our own.

And yes is the best statement overall.
Thanks so we can open a new bottle of. Ordeaux!

Salut mea amis.

@ Doug: Let's only declare how art might be done, but not how art should rather not be be done!

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

@ Doug: Let's only declare how art might be done, but not how art should rather not be be done!
Hard to disagree with that.

But I fear you never took in what I originally wrote here, other than perhaps through a prism of your own (unnecessary) worries.

Best regards,

Doug
 
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