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Flowers by the wayside, I show mine, now show yours! Just Monocots e.g. orchids!

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Chris,

These are an excellent find! The colors are so rich. A great addition to out series on monocot flowers!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
We will try to repair any broken links above.

Meanwhile with my iPhone XS Max, these are cousins to the popular and larger purple Iris!


2198


Asher Kelman:”Dietes Grandiflora by tree”


2199


Asher Kelman:”Dietes Grandiflora by fallen leaves”


Asher
 
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When I need to think I go to one of the many gardens in my area. This is from the Cross Estate Garden in Central NJ about 30 minutes from home. A rather heavy thunder storm passed through and damaged many of the flowers and yet if one looked helped create some more beauty
i-LgCXSqK-X2 (1).jpg
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
When I need to think I go to one of the many gardens in my area. This is from the Cross Estate Garden in Central NJ about 30 minutes from home. A rather heavy thunder storm passed through and damaged many of the flowers and yet if one looked helped create some more beauty
Steven,

I like the excessiveness of the packed fecundity of the plant. But I can’t make out what tge yellow parts are? Micro flowers or pollen bearing antlers?



3E35F459-7EEC-4616-B427-77D6E2B45BCC.jpeg



What flower is this?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
the flower is a Peony
Of course!

That explains, (being a dicot), in part, why I had no idea what it was! Actually, I would have not identified it myself!

So pleased it caught your eye.

let me share this on the surprising anatomy we see:

“Stamen transformation in the anemone form has progressed toward petal characteristics to the point where all visible evidence of stamen origin, except for yellow color, has disappeared. These structures are termed petalodes, being the transitional form between staminodes and inner petals. In some kinds these petalodes are very narrow, and yellow, giving contrast comparable to that of the Japanese form flower. On others the petalodes will be larger. As size is further increased, the transformed segments become longer, wider, and take on the texture and color of the guard petals, leading to the Bomb flower form.”

349E82DD-623F-477B-BA93-8916DFA8FDDE.jpeg



So, in your beautiful and generously packed flower, the stamens appear to have been modified to move away from pollen production and serve as an intermediate with transitional form towards becoming an inner petal. I think these are petalodes already well on their way to completing their transformation.


Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
So you said:
-flowers
-by the wayside and
-monocots.

I found the challenge amusing because, even if I am no plant specialist by far, I know that most grasses are monocots. And they grow by the wayside, so there you are:

Dactylis_glomerata.jpg


Dactylis glomerata agg. (Cock’s-foot)

Lolium_multiflorum.jpg


Lolium multiflorum (Italian Rye-grass)
Yes, theses are flowers. The first one is popular amongst butterflies.

I cheated for the identification. There is an app called FloraIncognita (https://floraincognita.com/), you point your smartphone at a vascular plant (i.e. not mosses, lichens, etc...) and it tells you what it is (it uploads your image to their servers). It is free, without adverts. As it was developed from Technische Universität Ilmenau and the Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie, it is designed for European plants but may be of some use in other continents, I don't know.

I am normally suspicious of apps requiring a server connection, but as this one is for scientific research, I think it is fine.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
So you said:
-flowers
-by the wayside and
-monocots.

I found the challenge amusing because, even if I am no plant specialist by far, I know that most grasses are monocots. And they grow by the wayside, so there you are:

View attachment 5077

Dactylis glomerata agg. (Cock’s-foot)

View attachment 5078

Lolium multiflorum (Italian Rye-grass)
Yes, theses are flowers. The first one is popular amongst butterflies.

I cheated for the identification. There is an app called FloraIncognita (https://floraincognita.com/), you point your smartphone at a vascular plant (i.e. not mosses, lichens, etc...) and it tells you what it is (it uploads your image to their servers). It is free, without adverts. As it was developed from Technische Universität Ilmenau and the Max-Planck-Institut für Biogeochemie, it is designed for European plants but may be of some use in other continents, I don't know.

I am normally suspicious of apps requiring a server connection, but as this one is for scientific research, I think it is fine.
I like your attention to grasses, Jérôme, as that is one of the main factors that permitted civilizations to develop with excess grains, (from selected grasses), being stored in granaries.

That brought us the mice and that brought us the cats! The cats in facts helped man evolve by eating the mice in exchange for a permanent safe home!

Again thanks for the great link for identification of plants!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
This is an excellent challenge. I first thought it was a succulent that flowers like this on a long stalk. But the flowers are not like that. This seems more like a flower from a leek!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Thanks for the fascinating picture! It really interesting that their are very beautiful cultivars of onion species that have been bred! I wonder whether they still are worth eating?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Driving home from West Hollywood, the central road divider was packed with yellow and orange lillies.

9A44318C-E4A7-4078-A3D4-64D56531F6C6.jpeg


Asher Kelman: “Curb Lilly“



FF983CD8-6074-4CB7-B2A5-CBD3550CD6AF.jpeg

Asher Kelman: “Lilly Love”

I parked my car and wearing my mask, went about gathering images with puzzled commuters wondering what this crazy old fellow is doing on the central divider in a sea of flowers!

Asher
 
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