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Format of Certificate of Authenticity & Receipt

Arun Gaur

New member
I would be highly obliged if someone provides these bits of information:

If a person has a photograph and sells it to a client:

1. What would possibly be the format of Certificate of Authenticity? I mean to say: what should be the essential and important information that needs to be provided?

2. In order to sell a photo, is it necessary to get a bill-book printed or can a seller simply print out a single receipt on his printer and hand that receipt over to the client?

3. Should the sales tax also be included in the price and mentioned separately?

4. Is the receipt also called an invoice? If not what is the difference between the two?

5. Can the Certificate of Authenticity and receipt be printed on the same page?

Thanks

Arun Gaur
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Certificates of Authenticity!

I would be highly obliged if someone provides these bits of information:

If a person has a photograph and sells it to a client:

1. What would possibly be the format of Certificate of Authenticity? I mean to say: what should be the essential and important information that needs to be provided?
My understanding is that a Certificate of Authenticity, or an equivalent document attesting to authenticity that the signed work is indeed made by the said artist and is applied to the following most important situations amongst:

1. Art Gallery and private collections acquisitions where provenance, the history of the work, is needed to buttress claims as to the identity of the work. Here the artist is likely already known, the price is hight and the potential losses if the work is a fake, are huge.

2. Sale by authorized dealers of works of famous artists or galleries or estates that have the rights to make and sell prints.

3. A marketing gimmick by unknown artists or hteir agents to make their work seem important.

It's easy to tell the difference. If someone is selling a work, ask what was the last art gallery auction price of a similar work by that artist or photographer.

Since for sure you are looking to use the certificate to bolster sales, as hardly anyone is at this time forging our works and signing them in our respective names , You are likely making certificates only under the category #3. That means then that your certificate should have a decorative border and formatted like a certificate for graduation from high school or the like.

It's sole purpose is to increase the apparent worth of your picture, not prove anything. "So what!", if the photograph was signed by Gurdip Singh from Goa, Bangaladesh, Madagascar, Calcutta or London. Each of them are unknown and it makes no difference what name is used. Only after you are lionized and a great photographer might it be important for authenticity reasons.

I'd say go for it! There are likely free templates on line for certificates. Just print it carefully and get a rubber stamp that has a sequential number on it and wind it up to 002176 and then stamp each certificate with a number. Sign it with a nice black ink roller tip pen!

Asher
 

James Cook

New member
1. What would possibly be the format of Certificate of Authenticity? I mean to say: what should be the essential and important information that needs to be provided?
The format can be whatever you prefer it to be. It's more a matter of providing the proper information than it is the arrangement or presentation.

The purpose is that it's a written guarantee that the print is what you claim it to be which may include the archival information. In some places, due to abuse of the term "Limited Edition", it may be required by law if you're selling limited edition prints, since you're claiming that only so many copies will be made.

In my home state of Michigan in the USA, it is required by state law, although many ignore that or are ignorant of the requirement. I have found that without a doubt, it enhances the appeal and price of my work. My most expensive limited edition prints have actually sold more frequently than less expensive open editions. And I have yet to be lionized. ;-)

2. In order to sell a photo, is it necessary to get a bill-book printed or can a seller simply print out a single receipt on his printer and hand that receipt over to the client?
I can't imagine that something from your printer would not be acceptable. I print mine, but I do have a nicely designed piece in order to keep everything about my work looking professional and top notch. Selling art prints is largely a matter of impressions.

3. Should the sales tax also be included in the price and mentioned separately?
Why would your photos be different than anything sold elsewhere? I've never seen a store with their price tags already including tax. It's a good habit to offer the info somewhere, but I think that depends a bit on how you're presenting your work to begin with: web site, gallery,....

4. Is the receipt also called an invoice? If not what is the difference between the two?
They're synonyms in my book.

5. Can the Certificate of Authenticity and receipt be printed on the same page?
I know of no reason they can't be. Unless there's some obscure law, it's a matter of personal choice. My choice is to use the certificate to enhance the overall package. I prefer to have the receipt separate so the money vanishes from being a daily part of the enjoyment, but the certificate reminds them of the quality of what they purchased.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
T
In my home state of Michigan in the USA, it is required by state law, although many ignore that or are ignorant of the requirement. I have found that without a doubt, it enhances the appeal and price of my work. My most expensive limited edition prints have actually sold more frequently than less expensive open editions. And I have yet to be lionized. ;-)
Then, James, we need to add to my list above

#4 Statement on number in series, provenance of image, type of ink and expected longevity under indoor light and any specifications or warranties, as required by applicable State, U.S., EU or other applicable National authorities.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Certificate of Authenticity, Disclosure and Warranty

I would be highly obliged if someone provides these bits of information:

If a person has a photograph and sells it to a client:

1. What would possibly be the format of Certificate of Authenticity? I mean to say: what should be the essential and important information that needs to be provided?
So Arun,

Here's my updating offering:
My understanding is that a Certificate of Authenticity, or an equivalent document attesting to authenticity that the signed work is indeed made by the said artist and is applied to the following most important situations amongst:

1. Art Gallery and private collections acquisitions where provenance, the history of the work, is needed to buttress claims as to the identity of the work. Here the artist is likely already known, the price is hight and the potential losses if the work is a fake, are huge.

2. Sale by authorized dealers of works of famous artists or galleries or estates that have the rights to make and sell prints.

3. A marketing tool by less known/unknown artists or their agents to add prestige their work.

4. A legally binding disclosure statement, if the same is required by prevailing local, regional or state laws to cover, for example,


  • Number in series out of total, if a limited series
  • Provenance of image
  • Type of ink or photographic process
  • Expected longevity under indoor light
  • Specifications or warranties
  • Satisfaction warranty and time frame and condition for exchange, return or refund


Asher
 

Arun Gaur

New member
I have also read somewhere (though I am not sure about the accuracy of facts):

1. COA is not legally required if it is an Open End Edition.
Or in other words we can say if it is a Limited Edition, then the COA is legally required.

2. If the selling price is more than 100 dollars, then the COA is required whether it is an Open edition or a Limited edition.

Arun
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I have also read somewhere (though I am not sure about the accuracy of facts):

1. COA is not legally required if it is an Open End Edition.
Or in other words we can say if it is a Limited Edition, then the COA is legally required.

2. If the selling price is more than 100 dollars, then the COA is required whether it is an Open edition or a Limited edition.

Arun
Arun,

Just in case a gallery might represent you, keep in mind that what you offer cannot be against the interest of a gallery. So if that's a consideration, don't have them competing with your private sales by some accident. Think it out and plan.

Asher
 
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