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generations

james sperry

New member
ok,
i'm having issues here. what should the exposure settings be when the image is intended to be a b&w? dead on .... should i do bracketing? i'm also thinking that a white background is also not a good thing. anywhoooo, i'm trying to do this shot before my son's hands get any bigger. i would greatly appreciate any tips for shooting an image that will be used for b&w.

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Hi James,

The lighting is adequate. Your thumb position you can work on. Try to limit that fold in his skin. The final modeling I'd do with a mask of different strength brushes of white black or gray on a curve layer or else use dodge and burn on a copy of the image layer.

Look at images from Michelangelo to get inspired on how hands can look. Durer did a lot of hands but I don't recall if there were any of children. There are famous pics of an infants hand holding a finger of an adult. Also many stock images for inspiration as a starting point.



Photo, Photosearch.com (why it comes up as OPF I don't know!)

Shoot a lot, whatever you do. Print them on plain paper and use a pencil to draw and change any position of your hand and then shoot more.

Looking forward to many more pictures!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
well, so much for original ideas. always a day late and a dollar short ... lol.
James,

I didn't understand that. Are you saying my response was late or that your idea id not new? Remember very little is new. Rather we need to show what we see. That, James is what no one else sees since we have our own history, experience and personality that filters, constrains and invents a lot of the relevance of what we see.

This subject, the two hands together, is like a kiss, open to endless interpretations. Let's face it, this subject is already laden with feelings of tenderness, vulnerability, responsibility, love and more. So you can challenge yourself without limit to come up with a unique view. It's this which allows new ideas to be tested in the marketplace of ideas. It's a free world for this. You don't have to pay your models but you do need to work at this.

Just pointing the camera and recording this clasping of the adults fingers is rewarding in itself. The picture will always bring smiles to you, the parents and to people you have never met. However, if the design is not clean and well chosen, by chance or not, the lighting appropriate, by chance or not, the depth of fields interesting, by chance or not then it will just be a nice keepsake.

So challenge yourself. I hope you will! There's nothing to stop you choosing composition, lighting, position of the camera, depth of field, lighting, (harsh or soft, single or multiple, shaped or not) so that you exploit everything you know so that when lady luck smiles at you, your picture will go beyond nice to wonderful.

Keep shooting!

The idea is still as fresh as every new rose still wet with dew, that opens to greet the rising sun.

Asher
 
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