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How to match Picture Style "Fine Detail" My on EOS 7DII

Will Thompson

Well-known member
My Canon EOS 5DS and 1DXII both have a Picture Style "Fine Detail" how do I create a similar Style on My EOS 7DII or at least match the "Out Of Camera" Jpeg sharpness?
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
My Canon EOS 5DS and 1DXII both have a Picture Style "Fine Detail" how do I create a similar Style on My EOS 7DII or at least match the "Out Of Camera" Jpeg sharpness?
Will,

Congrats on getting one of the most sophisticate focus catchers ever made. I hope you are seduced into pushing the boundaries of your photography, especially action pictures in the street, made in a moment of inspiration. Here all you need to do is frame well and your picture should be spot on every time!

As to reproducing a look you like on an earlier camera, I think it's going to be "trial and error"! That is the way one would do it even if Canon told us some particular settings would look the same. Who knows what was upgraded in the translations up the data chain from sensors of even a pair of such closely related bodies!

Also with the 7D II, you are using a different part of the lens which further separates them under some circumstances.

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

Also with the 7D II, you are using a different part of the lens which further separates them under some circumstances.
How does that happen? Would we run the lens at at different aperture on a 7D II than on a 5DS?

Perhaps you are thinking of using a different part of the lens' image circle. (That is certainly important, but is a different thing than "using a different part of the lens".)

Best regards,

Doug
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Hi, Asher,



How does that happen? Would we run the lens at at different aperture on a 7D II than on a 5DS?

Perhaps you are thinking of using a different part of the lens' image circle. (That is certainly important, but is a different thing than "using a different part of the lens".)
Doug,

Both! When the lens is used wide open, the uniquely crafted, (or not so crafted), outer edge of the lens is cropped out of the image and so does not contribute as much to the "the artistic writing" that contributes to the dimensionality, glow or other esthetic sentiments appreciated by those who like such effects which they are able to recognize.

Asher
 

Tom dinning

Registrant*
Doug,

Both! When the lens is used wide open, the uniquely crafted, (or not so crafted), outer edge of the lens is cropped out of the image and so does not contribute as much to the "the artistic writing" that contributes to the dimensionality, glow or other esthetic sentiments appreciated by those who like such effects which they are able to recognize.

Asher
What?

Here's the 'a' you lost, Ash.
As for the rest I'm still rummaging through the thesaurus.
Perhaps I need a glass of chard to help translate.
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,
Both! When the lens is used wide open, the uniquely crafted, (or not so crafted), outer edge of the lens is cropped out of the image and so does not contribute as much to the "the artistic writing" that contributes to the dimensionality, glow or other esthetic sentiments appreciated by those who like such effects which they are able to recognize.
When the "outer portion of the lens" is taken out of play is when we stop down the aperture, not when we choose to catch on our sensor a smaller part of the entire image generated by the lens (as when we mount a certain lens on a body with a smaller sensor).

If we use a smaller sensor (and assuming we have the same aperture), what is taken out of play is more of the the outer portion of the generated image, where typically (but not always) the image performance is not as good as nearer the center of the image circle.

In any case, for a set of objects which are in the field of view of both cameras using the same lens (one with a smaller sensor than the other), those objects will be rendered by the lens on the smaller sensor exactly as on the larger sensor. (The lens does not "know" which portions of its image circle will be captured on a sensor.)

So it is hard to imagine that any objective or subjective properties of those objects' image (even in such terms as the "artistic writing", or dimensionality, or glow, or creaminess, or loveliness) will be different in the image as delivered by one camera from the other, unless of course those differences are contributed by differences in the sensor or the subsequent processing of the image.

Now I'm sure that you are referring to some well-recognized situation but have perhaps done so in language that I find technically not rigorous. Perhaps you can give some more discussion of in what situation does the phenomenon of which you speak occur.

Best regards,

Doug
 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Doug,

Your mind is tack sharp. Kudos!

Let's consider an image projected from said lens on to a full size "35mm" frame. The edges will have certain characteristics, degradations or fabulous magic that is not found in the center of the frame. Other magical effects appreciated by the savant photographer might be in the center. The latter characteristics will be unchanged in a cropped image with the lens wide open. By contrast, any unique and also desirable edge effects will likely be missing in the cropped sensor who's projected image fails to get the edges of the projected field that fall beyond its borders.

So while the central portions will be identical except for sensor differences, the border areas of the full size image will have unique features missing from the it's cropped sibling!

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

Doug,

Your mind is tack sharp. Kudos!
Thank you.

Yes, that's why I parked in the wrong parking lot yesterday when I went to New Mexico State University to, along with over 300 young engineering graduates, receive my engineer's steel ring!

Let's consider an image projected from said lens on to a full size "35mm" frame. The edges will have certain characteristics, degradations or fabulous magic that is not found in the center of the frame. Other magical effects appreciated by the savant photographer might be in the center. The latter characteristics will be unchanged in a cropped image with the lens wide open.
Or at any other aperture consistent between the two frame sizes.

By contrast, any unique and also desirable edge effects will likely be missing in the cropped sensor who's projected image fails to get the edges of the projected field that fall beyond its borders.

So while the central portions will be identical except for sensor differences, the border areas of the full size image will have unique features missing from the it's cropped sibling!
Well said!

Best regards,

Doug
 
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