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I cooked today.

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Tonight: Asperges vertes au gratin et soufflé au fromage:

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A glass of Saumur goes very well with the dishes!
 
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Jerome Marot

Well-known member
La recette du soufflé au fromage:

100g de farine, 100g de beurre, 500ml de lait, sel, poivre: avec ces ingrédients, faire une béchamelle très épaisse.
Laisser refroidir, incorporer 150g de gruyère et les jaunes de 5 œufs. Verser la préparation dans un moule beurré.
Battre les blancs en neige. Incorporer les blancs battus à la préparation au fromage. Attention: l'incorporation est assez délicate. C'est l'air des blancs battus qui va faire monter le soufflé. Il faut donc incorporer les blancs petit à petit en repliant la préparation au fromage autour:

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...toujours retourner la préparation au fromage autour des blancs d'œuf en lissant avec la cuillère.

Lorsque tous les blancs sont incorporés, mettre au four d'abord moyen puis chaud pour 45 à 60 min. Piquer avec un couteau pour vérifier la cuisson.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Tonight: quiche au broccoli et fromage bleu.

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Served with diced tomatoes and chives.

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For wine, a light red is perfect: Chinon, côtes du Rhône ou côtes de Blaye, for example.
 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Jerome,

Thanks for the “invitation” for dinner. I will show my wife your great pictures of the quiche. If you have a link to the recipe we will done well and see if we can match the wine from out cellar!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Quiches are quite easy, they are basically a cheese omelette in pie form. The basic recipe for the filling takes:
-2-3 eggs
-150-200g grated gruyère (or similar hard cheese)
-about 200-300ml cream or cream+milk.

The part with the cream depends on what kind of cream is sold where you live. In France, "crème fraîche" is 40% fat, so you add a part of milk or the filling will be too dense. Sour cream is 10% fat. That works, but tends to water the crust a bit. About 15-25% fat for the mixture is ideal.

Then, you can exercise some creativity. Here, I added broccoli (pre-cook for 3 min) and replaced some of the cheese with blue cheese. You can add fish (tuna and salmon are very nice), bacon cubes (that is the traditional recipe), tomatoes, spinach, etc... Don't go wild with spices (although fish takes a bit of spices very well) and exercise common sense.

When adding vegetables, you need to make sure you don't add too much water or the filling will collapse. When replacing the cheese, you need to keep a minimum of 75-100g of gruyère or a similar cheese that will glue the stuff together when melted.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
With chunky croutons, chipotle, sour cream, guacamole
Guacamole is nice, but you need ripe avocados which are not always easy to find in Munich. As to chipotle, I understand these are smoked chilies. I grow chillies, but cannot easily smoke them. I think I posted some pictures of the chilli plant in another thread about flowers.
 

Andy brown

Active member
Jerome, one of my fuckit list items (I don’t believe in bucket lists) is to make guacamole with avocados I’ve grown.
The tree is only a few months old at the moment.
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
My honey treats me so good. I love love love peameal bacon, and she surprised me with the treat this morning.

For those who don’t know (and for our American friends who claim it’s something else altogether), peameal bacon is wet-cured pork loin from the back of the hog that has been trimmed of fat and rolled in cornmeal, creating a yellow crust. Originally, it was rolled in crushed yellow peas, hence the name peameal. It is much leaner than the pork belly strips that the British call “streaky,” and Canadians and Americans simply call “bacon.”

The brining process makes it nearly impossible to overcook, and it’s both leaner and juicer than regular bacon. A uniquely Canadian product, it’s often confused with Canadian bacon, a smoked back bacon that’s popular in the U.S., and isn’t Canadian at all.

Unlike Canadian bacon, peameal bacon must be cooked. The best way to prepare it is by griddling, although it can also be baked, barbecued or roasted.

As all of our Spanish acquaintances say when passing everyone who is eating or in the process of eating —- “Buen Provecho”


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Robert Watcher

Well-known member
First taste of Swiss Chard from our little garden, with breakfast this morning. Topping off leftovers from last nights supper- roast beef/gravy/horse radish, fried mashed potatoes/gravy, and my favourite egg preparation- huevos rancheros


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Jerome Marot

Well-known member
In another thread about flowers, I presented the harvest of a chili plant which managed to survive winter. But what to do with the chilis? I cooked them last sunday. As usual with French cooking, it starts with garlic:

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Then, the chili are added and fried. DO NOT do that inside, do that outside and watch the direction of the wind. You have heard about tear gas? Same stuff.

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Add vinegar and keep boiling:

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Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Because these chilis are way to hot for my taste, I added tomatoes (from a tin). I added spices as well:

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Cook another 10 minutes or so, then put into a blender. Reheat the sauce to sterilize before putting it in jars:

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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
A great sauce! Thanks, Jérôme!

I have forwarded to my personal chef, banker and breadwinner to replicate it!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Today my dear wife took pesto and romesco to cover the grilled salmon.

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We are so fortunate during this pandemic to be relatively isolated and to be well fed without ever going near a restaurant!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Meticulously clean! Is this in soil or hydroponic? How many meals do you plan or this is just the start?

Asher
 

James Lemon

Well-known member
Meticulously clean! Is this in soil or hydroponic? How many meals do you plan or this is just the start?

Asher
This is hydroponic Asher but next year I will build some self wicking containers with soil. I could start harvesting leaves soon or let them grow to maturity but I am running out of time due to business obligations. Maybe give some away to neighbors and transplant into soil not sure?
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I did not cook this (bought it already cooked), but eating takes so much time that it should count as "self prepared food", shouldn't it?

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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Your rusty pliers look like they are going to get a real workout.

[The use of rusty large family iron cooking pots helped folk with their needed iron intake!]

Bon appetit!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
The pliers belonged to my grandfather. They found a new use with crabs for the past 40 years. No other tool is more efficient and I know that iron oxide is not toxic!
 
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