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Koh Kradan revisited

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Well done, Nigel,

You composed the picture also well. Did you click away as she came up from the water?

You may have two more frames for a vertical triptych!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Well done, Nigel,

You composed the picture also well. Did you click away as she came up from the water?

You may have two more frames for a vertical triptych!

Asher
Sorry Again Asher
This really a beautiful portrait, and at 28mm Nigel was so close t her!, but we don't need the entire story, we are creative enough to imagine before and even after…
Did she embrace the photographer or did she dive again?
Let's the image maker keep his secrets!
That's the power of a single photograph!
We call it an image…
:)
 
Thankyou for your kind words. Slight correction...although shot at 28mm this is 100% crop. I am mid air currently but when i land i will post the whole frame.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Sorry Again Asher
This really a beautiful portrait, and at 28mm Nigel was so close t her!, but we don't need the entire story, we are creative enough to imagine before and even after…
Did she embrace the photographer or did she dive again?
Let's the image maker keep his secrets!
That's the power of a single photograph!
We call it an image…
:)
Nicolas,

The late Leonard Cohen, one of the most important philosophical/prophet poet singers, (another was Bob Dylan) who stamped their ideas on the culture of the post war 20th Century in at least English speaking countries, sang, in ”Bird on the wire”, about two people he met and gave him advice.

“I saw an old man leaning on his wooden crutch, he said, “Man you must not ask for so much!” Then I saw a pretty woman leaning in a darken door and she cried out, “Why not ask for more!”

Well, my friend, I have always ignored the old man and followed that woman in the darkened door. I always push the margins to ask for more, and I try to give more too!

In this case, the sequence add multidimensionality.

After all, you could represent a car with one recognizable headlight, a girl with an upper lip and nostrils and a yacht with just the stern and wake against the sky.

We show more as we want to build a picture that allows even more associations and it becomes a larger virtual space to explore.

Most often, the photographer has indeed taken a sequence and would love to know folk were interested that much! Furthermore, I have noticed in exhibitions that such presentations get more folk lingering at that point in an entire show.

It’s not that a sequence is “necessary”, rather if it is already there, often it’s worth sharing too.

Asher
 
This brings up an interesting subject for debate: Nicolas has a point...there's a lot to be said for letting your imagination create the back story. I see a trend amongst photographers to try and caption every image explaining it instead of letting the image speak for itself. After all isn't it worth a thousand words?
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
This brings up an interesting subject for debate: Nicolas has a point...there's a lot to be said for letting your imagination create the back story. I see a trend amongst photographers to try and caption every image explaining it instead of letting the image speak for itself. After all isn't it worth a thousand words?
Nigel,

I am only arguing my point as your picture struck me as exceptional and the model adorable to the nth!

BTW, I never mentioned any text! There’s, of course no need, although most images can benefit from a title or introduction, but not here!

However, in truth, with modern cameras, unlike the old days of film, we often happen to take multiple neighboring images. Sometimes, it’s worth evaluating, not merely single frames, to seek the most impressive and evocative, but as in this perfect case, a few that are separated by time.

After all, that’s how an artist’s related Street photography, ballet imagery, industrial scenes or portraits all work with each other in a museum. One moves from image to image and, like an aroma from a great food dish, the flavors of each photograph set up the senses for the next image.

Still, I do not advocate showing multiple related images of a sequence, as any preference or rule. However, there if there is no “one peak moment” that renders irrelevant all previous and subsequent shots, the entire shoot can be allowed to speak to the artist. It might sometimes then be, that several pictures work especially well together. It’s that surprise one can be open to!

This is such a case where I would bet on you having other equally rich and impressive images to consider.





I am not saying it should ever be the case that you “need” multiples. However, I commend just the idea for your occasional consideration. Again, here no need for a single word, as this is as natural as a mother nursing her infant or a child running into her father’s arms!

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
This brings up an interesting subject for debate: Nicolas has a point...there's a lot to be said for letting your imagination create the back story. I see a trend amongst photographers to try and caption every image explaining it instead of letting the image speak for itself. After all isn't it worth a thousand words?
So true!
Thanks
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
agree...and i will show more from that sequence
Oh, please don't steal my imaginations and dreams that your image did suggest to me!

Asher, today, most online shops make suggestions for other items when you order some '"Buyers of this item have also bought this and that".
Am I stupid enough to be driven like this?
I want to keep my brain and spirit free!
Let me dream on my own with damn good image like Nigel's one!
I don't need before and after, unless this is the photographer's choice because he/she thinks this is needed and add to "his" story…
The latter IS the point…
 

Peter Dexter

Well-known member
I didn't catch this until now. It's a stunning image though I wish we could see her eyes. Nicolas asks if she embraced the photographer. One hopes she didn't at that moment for the sake of the camera.
 
Triptych

Well done, Nigel,

You composed the picture also well. Did you click away as she came up from the water?

You may have two more frames for a vertical triptych!

Asher


HERE YOU GO, ASHER. THE COLOUR VARIATION IS PROBABLY DUE TO EDITING THESE ON MY LAPTOP WHEREAS THE ORIGINAL WAS DONE ON MY MAC.


1. BEFORE



2. FULL FRAME OF CHOSEN SHOT



3. AFTER




4. AND ANOTHER FROM THIS SET

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Nigel,

I am thrilled that you brought us to the actual shoot with these excerpts from the session. Such a wonderful model to collaborate with.

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
This, Nigel, is a totally unexpected gem. She becomes a new island in the ocean.

I am impressed with your creativity and this is inspirational to me.

I do hope you will work more with her and experiment further in using parts of her form as landscape features against the water and sky.

I have seen work like that on sand dunes and amongst rocks but never before in the water.

Asher
 
This brings up an interesting subject for debate: Nicolas has a point...there's a lot to be said for letting your imagination create the back story. I see a trend amongst photographers to try and caption every image explaining it instead of letting the image speak for itself. After all isn't it worth a thousand words?
Nigel, I love these pictures. Also agree with you about the topic for an interesting debate. I love a debate and appreciate the one started by Asher and Nicholas. You correctly state that an image should 'speak for itself'. But surely the cliche that 'an image is worth a thousant words' only applies to those without talent with words. Asher quoted lyrics by singer/philosopher Leonard Cohen: "<I saw an old man leaning on his wooden crutch, he said, “Man you must not ask for so much!” Then I saw a pretty woman leaning in a darken door and she cried out, “Why not ask for more!”>. To me, those mere 40 words convey deep insights about philosophies for living - as well as indicting ageist and sexist stereotyping against Cohen. I don't see how a photo - by itself - could convey those spoken and unspoken messages nearly as well. Surely, words of wisdom (or subtle derogation) are spoken or written by those good with words. Photos convey surface meaning, and do so well when taken by those good at photography.

Cheers, Mike
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Mike,

The picture, itself doesn’t evoke the poet’s words, just my lust for more of life. I unabashedly stop, even when with others, to devour sights of trees with blossoms, couples hugging, an old water tower or a dragon fly on patrol, plotting its course to intersect an insect on the wing and, without altering its course, start dismembering its prey and feeding, looking for the next victim. I take everything in, from a bird on the telephone wire to a comely girl leaning on one booted foot, waiting to cross the road.

So, when Nigel shows me the peak action, I know there were more from that session. That’s when the cry of the poet’s “woman in the darkened door” echoes in my brain and drives me to also ask for more!

As to the picture speaking for itself, that CAN be true, (that it can adequately explain itself), for sunsets, horses in meadows, sheepdogs herding in the sheep, mothers nursing infants and the like or an old abandoned shack, succumbing to the will of nature to reclaim it. .

Many other images do, indeed, almost always require introduction, prior specific knowledge and/or context to have any chance of the resultant evoked emotions and thoughts being anywhere near congruent with the intention of the artist, beyond the shapes acting as a kind of “Rorschach Inkblot Test”!

Nicolas simply follows the stoicism, good manners and discipline of the poet’s “Old man leaning on his wooden crutch”! He sees one wonderful picture and appreciates it very much, (just as I do). He also knows there must be more, but wouldn’t dream of appearing intrusive or unsatisfied.

Asher
 
Mike,

The picture, itself doesn’t evoke the poet’s words, just my lust for more of life. I unabashedly stop, even when with others, to devour sights of trees with blossoms, couples hugging, an old water tower or a dragon fly on patrol, plotting its course to intersect an insect on the wing and, without altering its course, start dismembering its prey and feeding, looking for the next victim. I take everything in, from a bird on the telephone wire to a comely girl leaning on one booted foot, waiting to cross the road.

So, when Nigel shows me the peak action, I know there were more from that session. That’s when the cry of the poet’s “woman in the darkened door” echoes in my brain and drives me to also ask for more!

As to the picture speaking for itself, that CAN be true, (that it can adequately explain itself), for sunsets, horses in meadows, sheepdogs herding in the sheep, mothers nursing infants and the like or an old abandoned shack, succumbing to the will of nature to reclaim it. .

Many other images do, indeed, almost always require introduction, prior specific knowledge and/or context to have any chance of the resultant evoked emotions and thoughts being anywhere near congruent with the intention of the artist, beyond the shapes acting as a kind of “Rorschach Inkblot Test”!

Nicolas simply follows the stoicism, good manners and discipline of the poet’s “Old man leaning on his wooden crutch”! He sees one wonderful picture and appreciates it very much, (just as I do). He also knows there must be more, but wouldn’t dream of appearing intrusive or unsatisfied.

Asher
Good reply, Asher. Among your many other talents, you're a poet and do know it.

Cheers, Mike
 
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