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Leica Q (Typ 116)

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
The Ricoh GR uses an 16x24mm sensor and its lens is only f/2.8, so you get much less depth of field control than on the Leica with a 24x36mm sensor and a lens open at f/1.8. I would think that the real competitor is the Sony RX-1 (24x36mm sensor, 35mm f/2.0 lens).

What makes the Leica Q unique are the ergonomics. It seems it is modelled after the M series, but with a fixed lens and AF instead of a telemeter. It has a viewfinder in the left corner (electronic) and traditional controls for shutter speed, aperture and focus. That last point is especially important for someone wanting to use manual focus to a pre-set zone, what is impossible to do with the RX-1.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The Ricoh GR uses an 16x24mm sensor and its lens is only f/2.8, so you get much less depth of field control than on the Leica with a 24x36mm sensor and a lens open at f/1.8. I would think that the real competitor is the Sony RX-1 (24x36mm sensor, 35mm f/2.0 lens).

What makes the Leica Q unique are the ergonomics. It seems it is modelled after the M series, but with a fixed lens and AF instead of a telemeter. It has a viewfinder in the left corner (electronic) and traditional controls for shutter speed, aperture and focus. That last point is especially important for someone wanting to use manual focus to a pre-set zone, what is impossible to do with the RX-1.
Jerome,

The Ricoh GR is so mature a camera with professional quality results, that I forgot completely that it was not full framed! So yes, the new Leica Q is more than a fabulous upgrade for a Ricoh GR user.

The Leica Q camera will be superb for street shooters as well as even photography. For sure, I'd forget the few limitations here too, LOL. :)

In fact, 28 mm focal length is so great, one adapts by using one's feet to zoom, and the 24MP sensor will allow for zooming in after the fact, anyway.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
True: 28mm is a very useful focal length.

The Leica Q apparently includes a built-in framing reference for 35mm and 50mm.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
True: 28mm is a very useful focal length.

The Leica Q apparently includes a built-in framing reference for 35mm and 50mm.
Jerome,

These are useful features. But to me it's just the simplicity that adds value!

Just for my needs, the new A7RII, (with over 40MP and ability to take Leica lenses), just edges out the Q .....................but barely and only because a kind and most generous OPFr gave me an almost brand new Leica Summicron 2.8!


I cannot overemphasize the value of shooting with one focal length for a considerable time.
Such devotion to single focal length, pays off with far better success in finding "keepers".​

Perception of value in a scene and finding "significance" is now based on far less options. The result, I'd argue, is one composes in a new unique way, compared to altering focal length at whim, with all one's creativity assigned to the possibilities inherent in that one lens. It has to yield a different kind of photograph!

I use just one focal length for 99% of my work! Only rarely do I carry a second lens.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
The A7RII (which will only be available later this summer) with a Leica Summicron 2.8 is certainly an interesting proposal. The Leica Q adds stabilisation, faster aperture, AF and generally better ergonomics.

Other possibilities for a comparable single focal length 24x36 camera include:

-the Sony RX1r (35mm 2.0), with its optional viewfinder
-a Leica M with a Summicron 2.0 (most similar to the Leica Q, but heavier and not stabilised)
-or even the Sony A7-II with the SEL28f20 lens (same resolution, same focal length and aperture and stabilisation, but a bit heavier).

Luckily for us, we have plenty of choice.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The Sony A7RII, (I originally wrote "A7R", ? Doug), will be available to order on approx June 17th 2015 at B&H and for "delivery in August", according to Adorama! That will give better and hybrid AF than the A7R with an updated CMOS sensor and a claim of lower noise. Of course, 5 axis image stabilization is added too.

As I almost always use manual focus with the Sony, the manual Leica lens is no barrier for my work. Still, for a vacation or casual, (but actually always , hopefully, serious), work, the Sony 35mm or the new Leica Q full frame cameras seem ideal.

It's great to have such choices at really usefully low weight forms. Goodbye back-ache and lugging a backpack of lenses!

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

Lemme get that straight. The Sony A7R will be available to order on approx June 16th 2015. That will give better . . . AF than the A7R.

What am I missing here?

Ah, I'll bet you meant to say:

The Sony A7RII will be available to order on approx June 16th 2015. That will give better . . . AF than the A7R.

Best regards,

Doug
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
It's great to have such choices at really usefully low weight forms. Goodbye back-ache and lugging a backpack of lenses!
Asher, you said above that you intend to concentrate on a single focal length. For this, you don't need a backpack of lenses, just a single camera with a prime. Whatever camera-lens combination you choose, I don't think the weight will be much different if you limit yourself to a single camera and a prime lens.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Asher, you said above that you intend to concentrate on a single focal length. For this, you don't need a backpack of lenses, just a single camera with a prime. Whatever camera-lens combination you choose, I don't think the weight will be much different if you limit yourself to a single camera and a prime lens.
Exactly!

Currently it's a "love affair" with my one and only Leica lens at 50mm! I feel so privileged, LOL!

But, " in years past", lugging around inventories of lenses was too common!


Asher
 

Wolfgang Plattner

Active member
The A7RII (which will only be available later this summer) with a Leica Summicron 2.8 is certainly an interesting proposal. The Leica Q adds stabilisation, faster aperture, AF and generally better ergonomics.

Other possibilities for a comparable single focal length 24x36 camera include:

-the Sony RX1r (35mm 2.0), with its optional viewfinder
-a Leica M with a Summicron 2.0 (most similar to the Leica Q, but heavier and not stabilised)
-or even the Sony A7-II with the SEL28f20 lens (same resolution, same focal length and aperture and stabilisation, but a bit heavier).

Luckily for us, we have plenty of choice.
but not plenty of money ... :))
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
but not plenty of money ... :))
Wolfgang,

I have come to realize that one has to force oneself become ruthless in selling off as much "favorite" gear as one doesn't actually use, so that one can put that to the specific gear that one can get the most value from right now.

Attachments to great cameras leaves significant funds in a drawer. With camera bodies ,the value shrinks every year! Lenses, however, are even more difficult to part with as prices are often pretty stable.

Perhaps we should get into the habit of renting rarely used lenses instead of keeping them as treasures!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
but not plenty of money ... :))
I omitted the price of the cited cameras in this discussion.

You can have 2.5 Leica Q for the price of a M and the 28 f/2.0 lens.
You can have about 2 Sony A7-II with the SEL28f20 lens for the price of a Leica Q.

I think that it will be very difficult to tell apart the pictures taken by any of these 3 camera-lens combinations.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I had the pleasure to try the Leica Q in a shop today. I'll spare you the full review, there are enough of these on the net already. I'll just give you my quick impressions:
  • the camera is about as big as the M with a lens
  • the ergonomics of the controls are indeed tops, with a special mention for the amusing mechanics of the macro mode
  • the electronic viewfinder is the finest (as in fine resolution) I have ever seen. I have very good eyes, I can barely see the pixels (I can on the Sony viewfinders). I could notice some colour tearing when panning, however. I was not able to test the viewfinder in bright sunlight.
 
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