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Man on a Hot Tin Roof

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I like the idea that this fellow is possibly fixing hi parents or his own roof!

He has no knee pads. Sort of looks “too slim and fit” to be a general laborer!

Asher
 

Chris Calohan

Well-known member
This guy, while not a general laborer in the sense of that's his day job, does do all the work on his many properties. Metal roofs (standing seam) are popular here as well as hurricanes rarely affect them.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Great link, Jérôme!



76C36BA4-A98C-4A19-8A1C-C855D2F4B0AC.jpeg

Asher Kelman: Ceiling Steel

We have a metal roof welded to a steel frame and then on top of that a 10” framed wooden covering for insulation bolted to a steel girder at the periphery anf covered with nailed 5/8” plywood and then asphalt shingles. The latter, I guess would fly away in a hurricane, but the roof would be easily repairable

Asher

 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I thought the picture was self-explaining.

As a translation:
  • blue is the wind
  • "toît en tôle" is the metal roof. They chose a round roof to minimize wind forces
  • the actual invention is the dark grey part, made of reinforced concrete. It protects the side of the roof from the wind while letting the water gets through. In that design, that part is reinforced (it must be as it will still receive the wind efforts).

I suppose it could be easier to simply make the end of the roof go downwards for half a meter or so and then connect it to the wall.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I thought the picture was self-explaining.

As a translation:
  • blue is the wind
  • "toît en tôle" is the metal roof. They chose a round roof to minimize wind forces
  • the actual invention is the dark grey part, made of reinforced concrete. It protects the side of the roof from the wind while letting the water gets through. In that design, that part is reinforced (it must be as it will still receive the wind efforts).

Thanks, Jérôme!
Thanks, Jérôme!

I did get that idea, but still a few of the words were new to me and hence my request!

In my design, I made a 10” high laminate of 18 glued layers of 1/8” marine plywood and faced it with stainless steel. It also similarly covers a gutter with a second gutter underneath for leaks built inside. The laminate is connected to 10” high vertical beams over the roof and to a 2x4 bolted to to a steel beam at the edges.

The profile is again sloped as in the diagram you shared, (but not curved), and the edge of our asphalt roof tiles is similarly protected To some extent by the 10” high steel-faced laminated peripheral beam.

Overall, rather similar in concept!

But I designed it only for myself and did no engineering calculations, at that time, 25 years ago!

It looks brand new today!

Asher
 
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