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New Sony

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Actually this may be one of the best digital cameras ever made in terms of the ease of use, full time, pretty well zero delay live view and tracking of a boat load of AF points it "assigns" to what moves!

Unless one has a need for the bokeh of longer lenses, this camera can do most of what the serious photographer needs short of detail rich scenes in the absence of stitching.

With the new high resolution lenses released today with this camera, it's a system that's hard to beat.

Asher
 

Robert Watcher

Active member
With the new high resolution lenses released today with this camera, it's a system that's hard to beat.

Asher
I'm not a Sony fan so am not overly read up about their products - - - - but with your mention of the 3 new lenses released at the same time as the Sony A6300 - - - I don't think they will benefit this new body much. They are all Full Frame lenses from what I am reading. It seems like the Sony efforts for introducing quality lenses are with the large FE lenses and not for those desiring properly designed APS-C lenses for the likes of this new body. It's too bad.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I'm not a Sony fan so am not overly read up about their products - - - - but with your mention of the 3 new lenses released at the same time as the Sony A6300 - - - I don't think they will benefit this new body much. They are all Full Frame lenses from what I am reading. It seems like the Sony efforts for introducing quality lenses are with the large FE lenses and not for those desiring properly designed APS-C lenses for the likes of this new body. It's too bad.
These APS C cameras are indeed fabulous and small, perfect for that second camera if you have a full frame Sony too or any camera as it will take most lenses with some adapter. I use Pentax screw mount lenses of great vintage, Canon FD, vintage German glass, Leica Etc.

But what they are offering to me is extra reach, putting those pixels on a bird or lion far away for little extra money on my part and ultra fast tracking.

But of course, except for wildlife and sports, we can do almost anything with any camera. I happen to like the Sony build of the image with the A7R, original version. It fares pretty well with the 80 MP Phase One in 30"x50" prints. There is just a tad more observable resolution in hair, but the Sony punches higher than its bantam weight!

Right now, I have dropped back to a Canon 6D as one of my sons "needed" the A7R, LOL! It was like trying to convince a Republican that "Global Warming" is, in significant part, the consequence of our production of greenhouse gases! In the end I just let him have it! I actually felt that a 5D mark I would be perfectly adequate but that was dismissed. In the end, I decided just to make him happy!

It's hard to convince folk out of their current bubble of delusion!

Thank goodness, my son has not joined some sect or worse!

It's just a camera!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
BTW, these 3 new lenses, at 50 lp/mm puts Sony lenses in a position to actually fully use the most advanced Sony sensors!

It is only relevant for those who need to make large detail-rich prints, but that is my interest. With this, the A7Rll should match the Sony Phase One 80 MP for my largest prints.

But I suspect that these lenses are actually built for an 80 or 100 MP full frame camera

Asher
 
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I've been a Sony fanboy for a few years now, since switching from Canon SLRs to an NEX-7 some years ago. Like many I went this route for the weight savings since I take most of my pictures on ski tours and hikes. That camera is showing it's age - the mount is loose, and the focus is slow, esp. with my new Tamron 150-600mm that I just got and am trying my hand at birding with. This little gem looks like just the ticket for that and like Asher said as a perfect back-up to my A7rII.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I believe that Canon could outclass everyone but it's model of commerce is so very disciplined, only slowly releasing advances needed to match or slide past Nikon once more. It holds a lot in reserve.

Sony OTOH, is not trying to protect an artificially bloated line up of cameras. Rather it seems to bring the best to market immediately! To me, the Sony A7R II and the 3 new GM 60 loss/mm lenses allow a photographer to tread safely and with aplomb in MF waters, but without the cost in weight and treasure!

I would say the just one lens, the 24-75 f2.8 GM lens could do whatever one wants and with the 28mm f2.0, (and its 16mm and 21mm adapters) work for architecture and travel too!

The new APS C camera could be used first for those being a tad short of cash and the quality would still be fabulous.

However, for compactness, it doesn't compete with the Olympus and Panasonic 4/3 which are so fine, fully optioned and mature. It's all a matter of how large a detail rich print one desires and the response to large financial range.

For the competent and savvy photographer, the best camera is the one one know instinctively.

Asher

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

I believe that Canon could outclass everyone but it's model of commerce is so very disciplined, only slowly releasing advances needed to match or slide past Nikon once more. It holds a lot in reserve.

Sony OTOH, is not trying to protect an artificially bloated line up of cameras. Rather it seems to bring the best to market immediately! To me, the Sony A7R II and the 3 new GM 60 loss/mm lenses allow a photographer to tread safely and with aplomb in MF waters, but without the cost in weight and treasure!

I would say the just one lens, the 24-75 f2.8 GM lens could do whatever one wants and with the 28mm f2.0, (and its 16mm and 21mm adapters) work for architecture and travel too!

The new APS C camera could be used first for those being a tad short of cash and the quality would still be fabulous.

However, for compactness, it doesn't compete with the Olympus and Panasonic 4/3 which are so fine, fully optioned and mature. It's all a matter of how large a detail rich print one desires and the response to large dynamic range of available lighting.

For the competent and savvy photographer, the best camera is the one one know instinctively.

Asher
All well said. Thanks.

As you know, for some while I have (not based on any experience at all!) felt very favorable to the MFT system.

I have de-emphasized the use of my Canon EF-mount system, largely owing to matters of weight and bulk. Still, I can't bear to offload any of it!

And for what passes for my "serious" work today I have gravitated to a Panasonic FZ1000, a very nice fixed lens superzoom machine (25-400mm ff35 equivalent) with a "1 inch" sensor and a quite nice integrated EVF.

But it is actually fairly bulky!

And on the "pocket camera" front, we are having very good results from our Canon PowerShot G16.

I think my next step may be to a MFT machine, quite possibly a Panasonic (hopefully with an integrated EVF). I visualize a small lens arsenal.

But first I need to start doing "more serious" work with the FZ1000.

Best regards,

Doug
 
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