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A Couple Very Simple Panos

It's been a while since I've posted here. So just as an experiment, I thought I'd post a couple 1:2 aspect ratio panoramas. As a long-time user of Canon tilt-shift lenses, making images with aspect ratios that fit the subject has become an m.o.

Rock River scene one quiet morning:



And a hill top view one morning last summer:



Thanks for looking!
 

charlotte thompson

Well-known member
Lovely captured I love the softness you have here in both photos Gives such a beautiful natural feeling which I do love!
Charlotte
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It's been a while since I've posted here. So just as an experiment, I thought I'd post a couple 1:2 aspect ratio panoramas. As a long-time user of Canon tilt-shift lenses, making images with aspect ratios that fit the subject has become an m.o.

Rock River scene one quiet morning:



And a hill top view one morning last summer:



Thanks for looking!
Tom,

Great to have you in our midst again!

What Canon T/S are you using and do you notice muchbofcaxdifferencecbetween swinging your camera with a standard lens and overlapping that way

I have the 24mm version I use for indoor architecture.

Asher
 
I use the latest version of the 24mm, 50mm (replaced the 45mm), and the 90mm. Pano results from these lenses are wonderful, but it really pays to have a sturdy tripod. It is also important to keep an eye on the degree of movement; go too far and optical aberration (purple/green fringing) begins to appear, even with the new lenses. This is correctable during processing, but preferable to avoid it if possible. I find a 1:2 aspect ratio with horizontal lens movement and with the camera body in landscape orientation is a reliable range.

I've no experience with using a pano head adjusted for nodal point, but suspect results are better than lens movement in a couple respects: greater pano area coverage is possible and optical aberrations will not be a factor.

However, as far as set up time and ease of use are concerned, tilt shift lenses are the only way to go. Very easy to carry around in the field as well.
 
Both beautiful but I can't help just adoring the first one with the morning fog just a bit more. I love fog in landscape images, it brings such mood and mystery. Glad to see you here again! :) Maggie
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Thank you for your thoughtful comments, Maggie! Agree with you about fog; it simplifies a landscape more effectively than just about anything else. Snow has a similar effect as well, now that I think about it.

Say, do you suppose it would be worthwhile to start a post about simplified Zen-ish photographs? Members could post sample images to illustrate approaches to minimize distracting elements.

Just a thought...
That would be a fabulous idea!

Asher
 
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