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Favorite Zoo & Wildlife Park photos

Tony Britton

Active member
A few of my favorite zoo and wildlife park photos. I hope you'll enjoy them. Hand-held, no cropping. Canon SX40 & SX50 cameras.

Harris's Hawk


Western Lowland Gorilla


American Flamingo


Meerkat


Himalayan Monal
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tony,

Are these also done with the same Sony camera?

I am simply blown away by the quality.

Where were the animals? Thr London Zoo is under great pressure to cover its £47,000 a month feeding expense. I hear the are starting a huge fundraising effort!

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tony,

Are these also done with the same Sony camera?

I am simply blown away by the quality.

Where were the animals? Thr London Zoo is under great pressure to cover its £47,000 a month feeding expense. I hear the are starting a huge fundraising effort!

Asher
Hi Asher,

Thanks for looking and commenting. These are from my Canon SX40 & SX50 fixed-lens superzoom cameras, both 12 megapixels. The animals are from zoos in San Francisco, Oakland and Sacramento California.

Tony
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Here's a few more. I'll mention which camera was used.

Western Lowland Gorilla Canon SX50


Blue-and-Yellow Macaw Canon SX50


Waldrapp Ibis
Sony DSC-RX10 M3


Western Lowland Gorilla Canon SX40


Great Horned Owl Canon SX40


Bald Eagle Canon
SX40
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tony,

These are so wonderful. What joy to feast on this array of creatures. There was a risk that the London Zoo would have to euthanize 22,000 animals or some crazy number!

Now how would you compare the Sony with the Canon zoom cameras. Any practical differences and what’s the Historical logic for your choices
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tony,

These are so wonderful. What joy to feast on this array of creatures. There was a risk that the London Zoo would have to euthanize 22,000 animals or some crazy number!

Now how would you compare the Sony with the Canon zoom cameras. Any practical differences and what’s the Historical logic for your choices
Hi Asher,

The Sony is by far the superior camera from a technical point of view. Considering lens quality, higher megapixel total, and larger sensor, it really is an excellent bridge camera. At the time of its release it was considered among the very best of the new crop of bridge cameras.

I bought the Sony when my first SX50 failed after many years of service. I subsequently purchased a second SX50 because I missed using it. The Sony has 20.1 megapixels with a 24-600mm (35mm Equivalent) optical zoom. The Canon SX50 has 12.1 megapixels with a 24-1200mm (35mm Equivalent) optical zoom. I use the zoom specifically to “fill the frame” with relatively close subjects, which is why I’m able to capture adequate detail with these smaller sensor, fixed lens cameras. I rarely photograph extremely distant subjects.

Still, even considering the technical superiority of the Sony, I’ve forged such a wonderful working relationship with my Canon SX50 over so many years that it remains my favorite camera. Fortunately, there’s room in my camera bag for both.

Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Each animal on its own are superb characters. I find your collections uplifting and strengthen my respect for diversity.

I question zoos as being cruel but if it helps us be aware of the existential threats to these creatures, it’s worthwhile!

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Each animal on its own are superb characters. I find your collections uplifting and strengthen my respect for diversity.

I question zoos as being cruel but if it helps us be aware of the existential threats to these creatures, it’s worthwhile!

Asher
Thanks for looking and commenting. I agree with your sentiments regarding zoos. The very concept of a zoo remains a very polarizing subject, to be sure.

Best regards,
Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tell me, Tony, what experiencexwith Printing these files. How well do they print very large to be viewed at about 18” in an exhibition?

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
Tell me, Tony, what experiencexwith Printing these files. How well do they print very large to be viewed at about 18” in an exhibition?

Asher
So far, the largest prints I've purchased have been 16" x 20" with my Canon SX50, which is 12 Mp. Here's the image with that camera, which looks quite sharp in print.



I imagine the Sony RX10 M3 would do quite well at even larger print sizes given its 20 Mp resolution.

When I do have prints made they're usually 11" x "14" because I like the look of a group of perhaps three photos on the wall rather than one large print. Originally, way back when, I didn't consider printing my photos when I purchased the long zoom cameras. Mainly to post the images on my website and with the hope of submitting them to magazines for possible publication.

Best regards,

Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
So far, the largest prints I've purchased have been 16" x 20" with my Canon SX50, which is 12 Mp. Here's the image with that camera, which looks quite sharp in print.



I imagine the Sony RX10 M3 would do quite well at even larger print sizes given its 20 Mp resolution.

When I do have prints made they're usually 11" x "14" because I like the look of a group of perhaps three photos on the wall rather than one large print. Originally, way back when, I didn't consider printing my photos when I purchased the long zoom cameras. Mainly to post the images on my website and with the hope of submitting them to magazines for possible publication.

Best regards,

Tony
How did you light that flower and what’s its name? Interesting innards!

Asher
 

Tony Britton

Active member
How did you light that flower and what’s its name? Interesting innards!

Asher
Asher,

Firstly, let me tell you how impressed I am with your Private and Public Art section. Your creative and thoughtful designs and images are superb on every conceivable level. You're extremely talented. Congratulations!

This is a Lotus flower. The light is natural sunlight. This is another example of the beauty of side-light, or similar to "Rembrandt Lighting" you might see in a studio setting.

How I take advantage of this type of lighting is by making any adjustments to the camera settings that results in darkening the image in the field. For example, using negative exposure compensation, high value shutter speeds, aperture values, and the lowest possible ISO value. Essentially, anything to reduce the overall brightness of the image. It's basically playing with the available light in order to create a look or mood I want to convey in the image. In post, I can further darken the image by reducing the "Levels" if desired.


Tony
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I am totally drawn in and mesmerized by your wild life images.

Simply fabulous Delivering an intimate and technically excellent experience!

Asher
 
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