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  • Welcome to the new site. Here's a thread about the update where you can post your feedback, ask questions or spot those nasty bugs!

I thought to share with you jewel

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
It’s a masterpiece of stunning cinematography.

I am amazed by the scenery.

I wish I had not been trained by Pepsi commercials to expect to get through 100 shots in 15 seconds, but it’s slow and with no narrator or poem it’s tough to follow the glacier slow movement , but immensely artistic and beautiful scenes so meticulously and parsimoniously revealed by brilliant camera movements.

I can take this for 15 minutes max. But I have a ruined psyche and can’t ingest, taste, enjoy and consume it fast enough!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
It’s a masterpiece of stunning cinematography.

I am amazed by the scenery.

I wish I had not been trained by Pepsi commercials to expect to get through 100 shots in 15 seconds, but it’s slow and with no narrator or poem it’s tough to follow the glacier slow movement , but immensely artistic and beautiful scenes so meticulously and parsimoniously revealed by brilliant camera movements.

I can take this for 15 minutes max. But I have a ruined psyche and can’t ingest, taste, enjoy and consume it fast enough!
Yann Arthus-Bertrand is primarily a photographer and his movies are like photographs. So why is it that you probably can watch a picture for a long time without being bored but find this movie too slow?

I'll argue that, it is a question of size and context. Photographs (and paintings!) are not experienced in the same manner when printed out large. This is the same for this movie: try experiencing in a theater (even a home theater) and it engulfs you. Looking at in on the small screen of a computer or, even worse, a smartphone is bound to be frustrating.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Yann Arthus-Bertrand is primarily a photographer and his movies are like photographs. So why is it that you probably can watch a picture for a long time without being bored but find this movie too slow?

I'll argue that, it is a question of size and context. Photographs (and paintings!) are not experienced in the same manner when printed out large. This is the same for this movie: try experiencing in a theater (even a home theater) and it engulfs you. Looking at in on the small screen of a computer or, even worse, a smartphone is bound to be frustrating.
Thanks, Jérôme,

I felt dispirited by my almost pagan response to an obviously fine work.

I will watch it again on my largest monitor. Yes it must be an immersive experience to meet the artist in his medium!

Ashef
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
That, and youtube has such a de-facto monopoly on Internet videos that this movie is presented on that platform, while the platform is mainly interested in shorter formats and vloggers showing the unpacking of the latest stuff they bought.
 

Antonio Correia

Well-known member
Myself I have not seen the document from the beginning to the end in only one session. It was seen in parts.

The zoom - or should I say the movement - of the frame while the picture is running is very interesting, even if the picture itself is a "movement"
In a few words: the video is very dynamic !

LR doesn't do that kind of work (travellings and zooms) in pictures at least with that freedom... It is something I would like to try my some of my shots

Cheers ! :)
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Myself I have not seen the document from the beginning to the end in only one session. It was seen in parts.

The zoom - or should I say the movement - of the frame while the picture is running is very interesting, even if the picture itself is a "movement"
In a few words: the video is very dynamic !

LR doesn't do that kind of work (travellings and zooms) in pictures at least with that freedom... It is something I would like to try my some of my shots

Cheers ! :)
Aha, Antonio!

That is actually very simple.

In many editing programs for slide shows, to insert into videos, one simply has high resolution stills.

Mark beginning and end frame and rate of travel from A to B.

The software then automatically creates sufficient frames to cover that time at say 24 frames per second for the time you specified.

You do not even need a video camera

Asher
 

Antonio Correia

Well-known member
I am investigating about the effect and I think (I may be wrong) but can only be done with Adobe Premiere Pro or similar software... I pay LR and CC amd just for this work not buying APP.

And I think it can't be done in LR !
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I believe you use a Mac. The Ken Burns effect is built in iMovie, which one gets for free with a Mac or iPhone/iPad. It is also part of iPhotos, which you may still have although it is discontinued.
 

Robert Watcher

Well-known member
Thank you Jerome ! :)
How could I not remember iMovie ? :oops:
Nothing fancy, complicated or costly needed. I have created Slideshows including the Ken Burns effect, on both my MacBook and IPad. For quick and easy, on my iPad or phone - I just use the stock Photos folder to generate a slideshow, and record the screen with the built-in recorder. If I want more control, free iMovie works great. I use LumaFusion on my iPad for most of my video production - and full keyframing is available to move pics around like Ken Burns —- but it is more manual work than the automation in iMovie.

iMovie on iPad is a cinch and can be exported up to 4K.

I just found this video that explains the same type methods I have used:

 
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