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Challenge for Pictures in a Series: Motif or Concept Post your home style food photos here , Lasagna yum yum!

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Tonight Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

1945


Asher Kelman: “Mushrooms Ready for Baking”

Recipe include vegetarian sausage, black beans, brown rice, red onions, garlic, Mariana sauce, sautéed for 15 minutes and then added to mushrooms on a pan in more marinara sauce and baked 380 degrees F, 30 minutes!

1946


Asher Kelman: “Mushrooms in Steam Oven”

This is to be served with a fresh fig salad.

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
More "home food" pictures. We have an excess of plums and tomatoes this season. One way to preserve them is to add salt and allow them to ferment.

1991
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Allons au restaurant, pour un bon dessert…


Tarte, pâte sablée, melons et pomme
Nicolas,

What a delight for the eyes!

I wondered about “pâté sablée”!

So I discovered it’s a pastry pie with a crust shell. That explains the reference to sablé, or “sand”!

Watch a French chef, (sometimes using fingers as extra scraping tools), delightfully show how he makes them!

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
1992


Jerome,

How come you add salt? Does that stimulate yeast, inhibit bacteria or what?

Of course this showed up more of my trans-cultural ignorance! I discovered this is also an Eastern European favorite especially with Vodka or as a condiment. Some folk swear by the brine after a night of drinking!

Asher
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
I wondered about “pâté sablée”!

So I discovered it’s a pastry pie with a crust shell. That explains the reference to sablé, or “sand”!
It is: pâte sablée. Pâté is a meat preserve. Pâte sablée is simply a kind of shortbread. It uses a little less butter than what the Scotts use for shorbread biscuits. It is traditionally used for "tartes", which are like pie but without the top layer of pastry.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
How come you add salt? Does that stimulate yeast, inhibit bacteria or what?

Of course this showed up more of my trans-cultural ignorance! I discovered this is also an Eastern European favorite especially with Vodka or as a condiment. Some folk swear by the brine after a night of drinking!
Yes, salt precludes the wrong type of fermentation to occur, as the Russians have found ages ago. Your citation is in error BTW: East Europeans would not have preserved tomatoes in this way for centuries, but other fruits. Tomatoes are native to the Americas and were unknown in large part of Europe as late as the early 20th century.
 

Jerome Marot

Well-known member
Do drinks count as food? I made walnut leaf wine yesterday.

First, you will need walnut leaves. This is a leaf, it is composed of leaflets (I had someone ask me what I meant by "leaf" once, as the quantities would obviously be different). You'll need to do this in summer, as young leaves have not acquired the right taste yet.

2013


For 1,5l you will need about 7 leaves. Chop them in tiny pieces and fill a container. I use a plastic bottle as cleaning the container from the leaves is next to impossible afterwards:

2014



Then add the wine. You can add a mix of 1l dark, strong red wine, 100-150g sugar and 1/4l alcohol (Rhum, Cognac, Vodka, any will do). You can also use Port wine, as I did here:

2015


Leave to rest in a dark place for a month (not more or it becomes bitter). Then strain. I simply fill back the Port wine bottles and discard the plastic bottle with the leaves.

Serve chilled as an apéritif.

There is a similar drink made with peach tree leaves. You may want to use a lighter wine, then and only leave the leafs for a week.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Beyond fabulous. I will try it. Because of Nicolas and your beautiful French name, I thought of my answer to you in French!

Asher
 
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