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Wildlife Portrait

Joel Slack

New member
Ivan Garcia said:
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Thank you Mike.
The picture is full frame (no crop), you are right, with hind sight, a bit more room on the left would have given the picture better balance.
My hunch is that this shot was a result of center focusing, but it is still a great shot. Possibly a crop on the right side migth even things up a bit, though I'm certainly no expert.
 

Ivan Garcia

New member
Asher Kelman said:
Ivan,

Where are these animals found in their own habitat? Also how are they doing?

Asher
Asher
Rockhoppers are a sub-Antarctic species.
They live and breed at cool southern localities like, the Falklands, Tristan da Cunha, Campbell Island, Macquarie Island, and the Antipodes.
Rockhopper penguin’s were hunted for their oil, populations have declined substantially, so, the species have been upgraded to "protected".
 

Andreas Kanon

New member
My submission

Always like competitions so here is my submission.

Photo by ©Andreas Kanon 2006_01 Wildlife Portrait_01

Northern Hawk Owl in silhouette against full moon

It's not a clear portrait but it's how i think of owls, night creatures with only their prey and the moon as company.
 

Steve Fines

New member
Andreas - this works for me.

I can imagine it took a little bit of time to capture one of these with an unobstructed view and a full moon.

My guess would be that you'd have to scout their position during the evening, as they could be very difficult to find in the dark.


Joel - "Steve Fines character" haha. I'm just a guy with a camera and some time on his hands.
 

Andreas Kanon

New member
Thanks Steve.
That photo took me about 200 hours all in all and the window i got was about 3 seconds when everything came together.
 

Louis Doench

New member
If this threads still open for submissions...

They used to do a wonderful event at the Cincinnati Zoo called Nikon Days. Nikon shows up w/ camera's and big nasty fun lenses and we all spent fathers day weekend pretending we worked for National Geographic.






Taken with my D1x and a 500mm f4 lens (too heavy..ugh)
 
Waiting for Dinner


Winston Mitchell © 2006_08 Wildlife Portrait_01


Camera: K/M Maxxum 7D
Lens: Minolta AF 100-400mm f/4.5-6.7 APO
Exposure: 1/300s @ f/8, ISO 400, RAW
Conversion, crop and slight PP done with Lightroom



The heron was a few feet away separated from me by a twiggy, leafless tree. I found a small "hole" in the tree giving me a clear view of his head. I setup the tripod and camera and made the exposure. The OOF twigs and backgound brush blended together.
 

Anil Mungal

New member
Copper-Rumped Hummingbird



Copper-Rumped Hummingbird
Anil Mungal © 2004

Date: November 21, 2004
Camera: Canon EOS 10D
Lens: 200 f2.8L​
 
The heron was a few feet away separated from me by a twiggy, leafless tree. I found a small "hole" in the tree giving me a clear view of his head. I setup the tripod and camera and made the exposure. The OOF twigs and backgound brush blended together.
I like this shot, Winston - gives a neat 'peak' at this bird, so I think your plans and efforts paid off. The background has a different type of appearance, which is soft and appealing, but relatively unique compared to other similar images.

I might tweak color balance and curves/levels a bit to make it 'pop' a tad more, but I think this is a successful image. Thanks for sharing.
 

John Harper

New member
Amur Leopard Portrait

Hi

Well this particular image started me on the course that led me here.

This was taken the day after I bought my brand new EOS 300D. I wanted to give it a try so i was off to Marwell Zoo, had not been there in more than 20 years.

A few hundred JPGS later ( Didn't know what RAW was back then..... Still not too sure now!!) and i had this one on the card. I have been back many times since and have not seen the leopard sitting on the same branch. He was only there for around 30 secs, just time for 2 shots. When i saw this i was hooked again .... I could now take pictures and not worry about film costs anymore! no more 36 shots back from the processors and put 35 of them in the bin or left in a drawer somewhere.

Little did i realise that a whole new area of expense was looming... software... memory cards.... ink... oh and equipment..... L lenses!!!! the list was endless.

But after all the expense and the errors and the time spent cursing at a computer screen, you just might one day get an image that makes you, smile, cry, laugh, or just reminds you that there is more to life than work or the worlds troubles.

Go out and capture your memories... as you get older they become more important..

(Steps down from soapbox... looking sheepish.. Rant Over)


John

 
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Snubbed

Well I too went to my local zoo one day trying to capture some images of animals that we don't normally get to see. The entire visit turned out a bit depressing actually. I love the fact that we have zoos and that there are a lot of good people trying to take good care of these beautiful creatures. I'm not zoo bashing. But on this particular day, perhaps due to me having a case of the blahs or something, every animal I tried to "capture" just seemed down and out and depressed a bit themselves. They were already "captured" and I could feel their dissatisfaction with that. I'm sure I was projecting but the entire experience that day left me feeling sad and worse than before I even went. It's hard to explain really. I can only compare it to me being stuck in my living room for the rest of my life, only being able to eat once a day and stare out my window. I'm sure this all sounds silly and you probably think I need professional help. Who knows? Maybe I do.

This image pretty much summed up my entire zoo experience for the day. He was the happiest looking animal there.


 
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Marc MOL

New member
Snow Leopard snarl !

Here's my FIRST posting and submission, so be gentle.
Taken with my Nikon D2hs & 300 VR f/2.8.



Marc Mol © 2007_ 01 Wildlife Portrait _ 01​
 
Hi Marc,

I like both of these shots - look sharp, well-exposed.

I assume these are captive animals? It might just be a quirk of the lighting, but the whitish appearance of the pupils in the 2nd shot suggest the presence of cataracts (I'm an Ophthalmologist, so tend to pick up on that sort of thing!).

Thanks for posting.
 

John Harper

New member
Hi Marc,

I like both of these shots - look sharp, well-exposed.

I assume these are captive animals? It might just be a quirk of the lighting, but the whitish appearance of the pupils in the 2nd shot suggest the presence of cataracts (I'm an Ophthalmologist, so tend to pick up on that sort of thing!).

Thanks for posting.
Hi Don - Marc

Just a thought on the pictures above, it looks as though a touch of fill in flash was used. could the whitish appearance not be the feline equivalent of "red eye"

Just a thought and perhaps you could let me know your thoughts.

John
 
John,

Just a thought on the pictures above, it looks as though a touch of fill in flash was used. could the whitish appearance not be the feline equivalent of "red eye"

Just a thought and perhaps you could let me know your thoughts.
You could well be right. Depending on the angle and distance, this could well represent a "red eye" variation. I certainly see odd reflexes in birds, depending on these factors.
 

Marc MOL

New member
Thanks Dan
These 2 shots were taken @ Sydney's Taronga Zoo. There were 4 Snow Leopards (inc two 18mth old cubs)
They were very co-operative and active that day, normally your're lucky to get any shot.
John-
Your right about the use of fill flash.

Cheers
Marc
 

Steve Saunders

New member
Here's one of my humble contributions;



I took this at Dublin Zoo in August 2001. The wild Herons wait in the trees surrounding the Zoo until the seals are being fed and then swoop down and grab some of the fish. I got lucky with this one, seen the shadow on the water and looked up and fired a couple of shots from my D1X and 28-70. The flash fired and provided a bit of fill.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Great beast and position of tiger. Thanks Fuji!

I have questions on whether you might want to remove the fence and work on the animals coat and eyes. I identify with the creature! By this I mean, thanks for the tiger, I'd like a print!

Asher
 

Dhaval Momaya

New member
Hi guys. I've been lurking around here for the past few months. Thought I'd jump in here. Here's my entry.


Spotted Deer at Bandipur NP, Karnataka, India.

© 2006 by Dhaval Momaya.
 
Welcome, Dhaval. Nice shot of the deer. I like the general composition, and the face shows great expression and detail. It looks a little dark overall on my monitor, but not too much.

Thanks!
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Leonardo,

The Ostrich looks like a corrupt politician who has had his head buried under the blankets with some Washington intern and is now exposed, not knowing anything and trying to withstand the publicity!

I would have liked some light reflection and color in the eyes.

All in all, it's an impressive shot and of course would be a great seller.

Dhaval,

That is one beautiful animal. The composition is pleasing and the grace of the deer comes through. The deer is well lit but as Don has noticed, is rather dark. You might be working at night in a dark room!

Thanks for posting!

Asher
 

Dhaval Momaya

New member
I am working in a dark room with a wee bit higher gamma, but didn't think it'd turn out to be that dark. Will fix it on a calibrated monitor. Thank you, Don and Asher.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Dhaval,

We love that deer anyway. It's just a delivery issue, no big deal. Almost all images have to be tuned for printing anyway. That will be printed well will be a perfect present for a child! It represents a lot of kind feelings.

Asher
 

Andreas Kanon

New member
American Tree Sparrow among ice crystals

Michigan had 2 days of frozen rain. When the rain finally stopped and the sun came out it was like walking around in a Walt Disney dreamworld.
The sun reflected everywhere making even the dullest subject beautiful.

I was lucky enough to find a flock of Tree Sparrows feeding in some tall grass. I had stalked them all day and not got the shot I was after, almost but not quite.
So as I was packing up my stuff and had packed away all but my camera and lens I heard the Tree-Sparrow chirping behind the barn so I thought what the heck one last try. So not thinking much of it I just took the camera with the 600 with 1.4 attached and hand held it.

The Sparrow flew up and landed perfectly so I had a hole which I could photograph it through to frame it on all sides and still manage to get a clean bg. As luck would have it a coopers flew over which made the sparrow sit absolutely still allowing me to get about 20 frames of before my arms and shoulders weren't able to cope with the weight.

 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
This Andreas, is so magical!

Ice can do such weird and beautiful things to plants as Rachel discovered here post 7 images 1 and 2 .

I found this about the Cooper's Hawk

Cool Facts

Dashing through vegetation to catch birds is a rather dangerous lifestyle. A recent study found that 23 percent of all Cooper's Hawks examined had healed fractures in the bones of the chest, especially of the furcula or wishbone.
A Cooper's Hawk captures a bird with its feet, and will squeeze it repeatedly to kill it. It does not bite the prey to kill it in the fashion of falcons, but holds it away from its body until it dies. It has been known to drown its prey, holding a bird under water until it stops moving.

Large numbers of Cooper's Hawks can be seen on migration, especially at hawk watches such as Hawk Mountain, Pennsylvania; Cape May, New Jersey, Goshute Mountain Range, Nevada, or Braddock Bay, New York. Autumn movements generally begin in late August and continue through early November. Young Cooper's Hawks tend to migrate about a week earlier than adults, and females tend to go earlier than males by a few days.
Source.

So this little bird must be freezing it's butt off, to scared to shiver and wondering why it came to this spot in the first place!

Yesterday I saw a film of a praying mantis catching a humming bird and another hunting and then eating a mouse! And you think it's hard to get along with people! What a charmed life we live!

Asher
 
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