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A story told in pictures

Derick Miller

New member
Thank you for the kind welcome into your community.

My photographic journey started with roll film at a very young age, since my parents were pretty into photography. For personal work, I used mostly B&W so I could develop the film at home.

I started in digital with the compact Canon G1 in 2000. I got it to use for pictures of family and was soon persuaded digital had advantages. Eventually, I got a Nikon and started using it in place of roll film.

These days I use Fuji cameras. I decided to stop producing online content of personal work and, instead, have gone back to producing work in print. This has been a good move for my growth as a photographer.

My work is primarily in the realms of editorial, portrait, event and reportage.

I don’t have much recent work posted online. Due to Covid, I made a video of some prints as a compromise :).


Derick Miller
 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Derick,

I am simply delighted to be able to flip through pages in your photo book.

Who printed it?

Are these printed by a company or you did each on a printer or in the darkroom?

Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Costumes are superb! What society/group sets up the show/event?

A great investment in design and sewing!

How did you light the costumed poses?

Asher
 

Derick Miller

New member
Derick,

I am simply delighted to be able to flip through pages in your photo book.

Who printed it?

Are these printed by a company or you did each on a printer or in the darkroom?

Asher
Thank you!

I printed all but one. I was under time pressure to finish the book, so I had the double-page spread printed by a printer who had appropriate roll paper size to get it done and I cut it to size. If I had had the right sheet size on hand, I could have done it, but it would have looked wrong if the size was just off or if the register was just off.

I printed bigger than needed and cut the image to final size, then sliced it in half for the perfect fit


Costumes are superb! What society/group sets up the show/event?

A great investment in design and sewing!

How did you light the costumed poses?

Asher
The group is international, so can be found in many places. It is called the Society for Creative Anachronism.

As always with such things, show up first without a camera and get to know people and build relationship before bringing a camera. :).

I keep my lighting pretty simple. Main light, active or passive fill, natural light incorporated if out in the sun.

I generally aim for the look of natural light paintings, so I tend to leave out background and separation/hair lights unless they are obviously motivated.

It is not hard to find people into costumes if you are motivated to find them. :). There are many other groups.

Derick Miller
 
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Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Thank you!

I printed all but one. I was under time pressure to finish the book, so I had the double-page spread printed by a printer who had appropriate roll paper size to get it done and I cut it to size. If I had had the right sheet size on hand, I could have done it, but it would have looked wrong if the size was just off or if the register was just off.

I printed bigger than needed and cut the image to final size, then sliced it in half for the perfect fit




The group is international, so can be found in many places. It is called the Society for Creative Anachronism.

As always with such things, show up first without a camera and get to know people and build relationship before bringing a camera. :).

I keep my lighting pretty simple. Main light, active or passive fill, natural light incorporated if out in the sun.

I generally aim for the look of natural light paintings, so I tend to leave out background and separation/hair lights unless they are obviously motivated.

It is not hard to find people into costumes if you are motivated to find them. :). There are many other groups.
Huge amount of intense devotion in dressmaking. Beautiful materials, lace, buttons, button holes etc!

Then how on earth do they find the shoes!
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
So this is 5 years ago. What are you photographing now that a ring light seems attractive?

Asher
 

Derick Miller

New member
The work in this book is more than a year old but less than five years old.

I photograph almost only people. Plus pets on occasion. When I photograph things, it supports the story relating directly to the people who are using or making the things in question.

So, with covid, at the moment, pretty much nothing. :)

I have been using a ring light. I want this ring light because it will do HSS and TTL. And because it will weigh less. These will all be upgrades from what I have now. And I already have a 200.

The smaller lens diameter supported and lower power will be disadvantages (there is no free lunch), but it will provide several useful options compared to my current setup. I can pick which ring to use based on my priorities for a given day.

Derick Miller
 
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jhone smith

New member
Tips to telling story in photos:

Stories are an integral part of human culture and storytelling is timeless. In photographic practice, visual narration is often referred to as a "photo essay" or "photo story."

Considering storytelling as art must be completely contagious, as Leo Tolstoy said. There, viewers are infected with the emotions in which they have lived, and others are in turn infected with their experiences. The phrase "photos are worth a thousand words" justifies the art of visual storytelling, but that does not mean that all photos tell a story.
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The work in this book is more than a year old but less than five years old.

I photograph almost only people. Plus pets on occasion. When I photograph things, it supports the story relating directly to the people who are using or making the things in question.

So, with covid, at the moment, pretty much nothing. :)

I have been using a ring light. I want this ring light because it will do HSS and TTL. And because it will weigh less. These will all be upgrades from what I have now. And I already have a 200.

The smaller lens diameter supported and lower power will be disadvantages (there is no free lunch), but it will provide several useful options compared to my current setup. I can pick which ring to use based on my priorities for a given day.

Derick Miller
Derrick,

The TTL 290 WS GODOX modification of the CL-30 vintage Canon Ring light, (designed and built by Will Thompson, here in OPF), gives to all the light you need.

But the 200 WS power brick can bevon your belt, over your shoulder or on the ground as there is a coiled cable connecting the two!

I highly recommend this setup for both macro and street portraits!

Asher
 

Derick Miller

New member
Tips to telling story in photos:

Stories are an integral part of human culture and storytelling is timeless. In photographic practice, visual narration is often referred to as a "photo essay" or "photo story."

Considering storytelling as art must be completely contagious, as Leo Tolstoy said. There, viewers are infected with the emotions in which they have lived, and others are in turn infected with their experiences. The phrase "photos are worth a thousand words" justifies the art of visual storytelling, but that does not mean that all photos tell a story.
Do you have any specific feedback or suggestions for improvements?
 
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