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Diagonal

Michael Nagel

Active member
For some strange reason I like the diagonal as composition element. There are various twists to this, is can be the main line used for the perspective a graphical element, a separation between two domains on the image or an implicit element resulting from the lines in the photo. There are many more possibilities to use this element to create a captivating image than I can think of.

Here are four typical uses (for me) of this element. I am eager to see more and different uses of the diagonal and to learn from it.




Best regards,
Michael
 

Ruben Alfu

New member
Hi Michael, nice variations on the theme. The scale of that station in the first photo is impressive, is that another photographer there?

@Jerome: very elegant photo!





Ruben Alfu : CD rack





Ruben Alfu : Red Rocks Amphitheatre



Regards,


Ruben
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Very good images folk.

Diagonals are lines. Lines lead the eye. Diagnols can be use for many purposes including dividing the elements, leading the eye; but for me diagnols as opposed to staright line have the important property of causing/lending instability. Dynamics to a static subject.

Here is a simple use of diagonals ( and other shapes ) where I have used them as frames within frames.


The smaller verticals..the bouy tower and the phone tower in the distance are crucial elements.
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Intersection of diagonal planes as opposed to lines.

This creates the depth required. Notice I am shooting at a diagonal not level to enhance the feeling of height..

 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Notice the crucial diagonal element here. I waited till she reached up to place the offering.


Why? What if I had just snapped with her hand outstretched horizontally?

Or what if I photographed her when she was approaching?
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
The entire series above is spectacular and a great theme! Michael Nagel gets the full measure of credit. This is his vision not mine! I hope others will follow suit and discover unique ideas of their own that we as a community can be stimulated to contribute to.

Imagine this comes from a fellow who's home is in a desert!


The smaller verticals..the bouy tower and the phone tower in the distance are crucial elements.
Impressive! Also nice picture within the picture!

Asher
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Fahim, thanks for your additions. The ship is a true gem. I can sit there for a while looking at it and still discover new aspects.
The offering has not only the diagonal as crucial element, but the the fact that the woman was not only reaching out, but climbing a step added to the impression here.
I like the train station as the lines combined with hard contrast create a very cold environment, which makes the few people the looking a bit lost.
The jeep descending a dune - yes, I can see the motion.
I do not tilt the image often as in your climbing pic, thanks for elaborating on this, I do know more why I do it sometimes (I like this one - was this in Switzerland?).

Mark - thanks for this one.

Asher, thanks. I was a bit afraid to come up with an element for composition here, as the general level is very high here and this simple element could be perceived as trivial here.

Here are two dynamic examples:



This is actually in the same vein like the climbing photo:


Start!

Best regards,
Michael
 

fahim mohammed

Active member
Michael, I really like the ' just right ' diagonals in the paragliding ( ? ) landing.
Yes, me the image I posted was in Switzerland.

Sandrine; a lovely serene post to add to this theme.
The title is apt; also reflects what most of my family feel about me. Except for my departed
grandfather!!

Thank you for sharing.
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Sandrine, I like how the high-key(ish) representation makes the black sheep more visible. For me there is another twist to it: The black sheep is heading uphill.
So being different is no bad thing!

Fahim, thanks, it was actually a take-off. It was possible to determine the precise moment of take-off without looking ;)
Quite a while ago I did a tandem flight with a hang-glider. The take-off was impressive, the flight was fun and the landing was rough.

Best regards,
Michael
 
Thanks michael...
The high-key stuff was one way for me to give space to the image, which is is something that I always tend to do. I remember presenting this image in a French forum and been literally told-off, because leaving some space is useless and space is precious so you have to fill it. It was cutting my legs off! I never thought people would consider the frame as a sustainable resource....
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Sandrine,

Whenever there is a minimalist aspect to a photo, the public who really appreciates this seems to be small. I made the same experience in other forums. There are some aficionados, but that's it.
This is also minimalistic, you might like it.

Here is a minimalist diagonal, most of the space is empty (no cropping or editing involved):


Best regards,
Michael
 

jake klein

New member
Don't worry Jerome. Buildings pop up like hot cakes these days!

I just posted this in the macro section but it seems to fit here as well..

 

Paul Cunningham

New member
Hi everyone, I am a new member here and I am enjoying browsing the forum. I thought I would add this one, some strong diagonals which don't lead the eye anywhere!



Regards
 
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