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Diagonal

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
There are never enough pictures of bridges and the Golden Gate Bay Bridge in San Francisco is a favorite, and we arrive there on the 101 N. from Los Angeles!





Jake Klein: S.F.Golden Gate Bridge in Mist



Tons of power breaking through the mist, over the San Francisco Bay, Pacific Ocean beyond!


Asher
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Well, here's something! I came across the redo of the Dior "Flagship" store in Beverly Hills. It has just undergone a $15,000,000 expansion. The window glass from Germany came in long flatbed trucks, long enough to carry a locomotive each, LOL! There were 3 of them at least and the glass was lowered into the store from above with giant cranes.




Asher Kelman: Dior Window Install

In the scheme of things, Dior probably has a bargain and lots of folk in Germany were employed in the bargain!

Asher
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
Asher,

thanks for adding both as these represent two distinct ways of using the diagonal.

For the first 'Being seen' I have the impression that the camera was slightly tilted to get closer to the diagonal using it more as a dramatic angle, be it intended or not.

I used the same technique on the following one, but I do not see it as the ideal way, more as fun from time to time:



The next 'Near St Moritz' uses the diagonal mainly as compositional element. This is the one I prefer of both.

Here is an old one (1989!) that uses the diagonal the same way:



Best regards,
Michael
 

Michael Nagel

Active member
I like the two recent additions.

James, the 'crumbling diagonal' is a good play with the shadow. Some would have waited to have the diagonal of the shadow to be the diagonal of the rear wall. Deviating from this ideal geometrical aspect is a gain here.

Chris, I like the simple way you use the vegetation here.

Best regards,
Michael
 

Chris Calohan

Active member
I liked this one for the countering effect of the single point of light moving uphill against an overwhelming downhill slant of trail, limbs and light.



A Find Along the Trail: Chris Calohan​
 
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