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Glamour Shoot & BHS

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Dan,

A sample for this day. best, dan
"No, dear, my antenna is longer than André's."

PhotoTip: When shooting at the pool, always use your neck strap. It can prevent the camera from going into the water. Well, maybe.

Best regards,

Doug
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
A sample for this day. best, dan




DanHostettler: #1



Dan,

I really enjoy the simplicity of the shot. It's easily appreciated as glamorous, upbeat, allowing us to fill in the rest of the possibilities of the girl, her sense of outgoing fun and provocative beauty. What was the lighting, the sky I expect. In any case, it looks natural and that's how it is best designed. Good job.



DanHostettler: #1
[/CENTER]


This second picture allow us to visit with you and such a backstory shot of the making of "#1" is delightful. It helps to show your model as a fun girl who one might actually meet, not an unreachable plastic beauty, re-sculptured for Vogue.

Such combinations allow us to see glamor in a more down to earth and human way. It's, after all, about our desire to connect and find the beauty of our dreams.

Asher
 

Nicolas Claris

Administrator/Moderator
Hi
interesting and nice to see the "backstage" but I would warn people to be very very cautious with electrical power so close to the water…
 

DanHostettler

pro member
Absolutely correct! You always need stagehands very close to all power supplies & lights. And you have to hammer into the model to be calm and not to dabble.
Thanks for your hint!!!
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Be Safe and Successful Please!

Content deleted as inappropriate.

Douglas A. Kerr, P.E. (Ret.)
 
Last edited:

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Do not rely on specific recommendations here for your safety. Although the physics of electricity is assumed to be constant around the globe, voltage, regulations and safety standards depend on local jurisdictions.

It's the responsibility of the photographer and entire production crew to look after the safety of everyone by following all the laws, regulations and precautions required and advised for the location. OPF, while encouraging safety does not advocate any particular protocol.

However, the kind of safety steps that Doug has suggested is meant to be a step in the right direction, but not your actual solution, as your needs will depend on the specifics of the location and shoot. I can't imagine it can ever be safe without a ground flow interrupt circuit on all power lines.

Always double your protection near water. Remember that ladders, booms, tripod can fall and drag cables into the water.

Be safe!

Asher
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Asher,

I can't imagine it can ever be safe without a ground flow interrupt circuit on all power lines.
By that do you mean a Residual Current Device (GFCI in the US) or something else, and if so what is that?

Thanks.

Best regards,

Doug
 

charlie chipman

New member
Great shot, I quite enjoy your light placement here, the simplicity makes it. The lens seems to be quite resilient to flare.

Technically speaking... and I don't want to hijack your thread into a monitor profiling discussion... but about one third of the way from the right hand edge I can see an abrupt change in the brightness of the white area. Photoshop tells me it is a difference from RGB 252 on the left to RGB 255 on the right. I do not bring this to attention to criticize but to see if perhaps there is a problem with my monitor calibration. I can see the line between the two clearly on my profiled NEC but not on my uncalibrated 2nd monitor.

Can anyone else see this?
 

Cem_Usakligil

Active member
Great shot, I quite enjoy your light placement here, the simplicity makes it. The lens seems to be quite resilient to flare.

Technically speaking... and I don't want to hijack your thread into a monitor profiling discussion... but about one third of the way from the right hand edge I can see an abrupt change in the brightness of the white area. Photoshop tells me it is a difference from RGB 252 on the left to RGB 255 on the right. I do not bring this to attention to criticize but to see if perhaps there is a problem with my monitor calibration. I can see the line between the two clearly on my profiled NEC but not on my uncalibrated 2nd monitor.

Can anyone else see this?
Yes I can see it too on my profiled Dell 3008 WFP monitor. I guess that Dan has extended the canvas in photoshop thinking that the difference between RGB 252 and 255 would be invisible but unfortunately it is. If I'd extend the canvas in such a situation, I'd always use the color picker to extend it with the same color as the immediate next one to the extension.

PS: I'd normally move this technical discussion to another thread but since it is directly about this picture itself, I cannot do so. My apologies to Dan.

Cheers,
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Charlie,

Great shot, I quite enjoy your light placement here, the simplicity makes it. The lens seems to be quite resilient to flare.

Technically speaking... and I don't want to hijack your thread into a monitor profiling discussion... but about one third of the way from the right hand edge I can see an abrupt change in the brightness of the white area. Photoshop tells me it is a difference from RGB 252 on the left to RGB 255 on the right. I do not bring this to attention to criticize but to see if perhaps there is a problem with my monitor calibration. I can see the line between the two clearly on my profiled NEC but not on my uncalibrated 2nd monitor.

Can anyone else see this?
Yes, I see it here. But I wouldn't have noticed it except after being alerted to it.

The rightmost band is uniformly 255, 254, 255 here.

Then there is a band to the left at 252,252,252.

Then left of that the color becomes variable, although not over a very big range for a substantial distance. That transition is also visible (once I start really looking)

The difference between the 255, 254, 255 and the 252,252,252 is mostly perceptible as hue difference (the latter, not surprisingly, looking just a little green by comparison).

The measurements are made by importing the image into my editor.

The visual perception seems to be about the same on my editor and right on my browser (Firefox).

The monitor (in both cases) is a ViewSonic VX2035WM.

Best regards,

Doug
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
Frankly,

I must admit, Dan that my eyes did not reach that far to the right! I'm still occupied with the left 1/3! I do like the composition using bright light to reveal, in part, just one captivating figure.

Asher
 
I get the impression that I can see the difference still, even on the updated picture. Or am I "seeing" what is not there? For my personal taste, it would not be necessary to add the empty space.

Christoph
 

Asher Kelman

OPF Owner/Editor-in-Chief
I get the impression that I can see the difference still, even on the updated picture. Or am I "seeing" what is not there? For my personal taste, it would not be necessary to add the empty space.

Christoph
You are not imagining the transition line. It looks definite to me. I had not bothered about it before, but now it's bothersome. It's easily fixed if you are going to buy a print, LOL!

Asher :)
 
I looked at Dan's website, where the same picture is vertical, probably not a crop, but the "unextended" version, and I have to say that i liked it much better. The making-of pictures are nice too, it seems not everybody has to suffer for the sake of his art.

Christoph
 

Doug Kerr

Well-known member
Hi, Christof,

In about 1970, at the downstage right entrance at Albuquerque Little Theater (Albuquerque, New Mexico), there was a placard reading:

"I know that to create art, one must suffer, but this is ridiculous".

It was thought to have been posted by the Director of Sound Production, whose "office" was immediately adjacent - a young smartass with a Scots name.

Best regards,

Doug
 
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